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Foods of India
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Tue Apr 18, 2006 5:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MJBodell---until the local health nazis started testing all the bowls of candies and whatnot that used to be ubiquitous at the check out station in restaurants here many Indian restaurants had bowls of candied fennel seed mixes for one to spoon into the palm of one's hand and savour as you walked to the car. I always enjoyed it, a bit "seedy" but what the heck. Sadly the authorities found traces of urine and e-coli in many of the bowls and the practise was discontinued!!
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Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Tue Apr 18, 2006 6:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

AAHH! Seriously!....people can be so nasty. Soap and warm water is all it takes! That reminds me, I have some fennel scented hand soap I got from Williams-Sonoma, so yummy.
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MJBodell



Joined: 07 Nov 2005
Posts: 47

PostPosted: Tue Apr 18, 2006 6:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

David -- Luckily in the US we still have them.

There is a spoon in it so people aren't putting their grubby ands in the mix.
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MJBodell



Joined: 07 Nov 2005
Posts: 47

PostPosted: Wed Apr 19, 2006 9:45 pm    Post subject: yummy drink -- and good for you Reply with quote

Turmeric
Turmeric comes from the root of a plant which is grown mainly in India, but it has been used in many countries for thousands of years as a healing food. It is known to be beneficial for the inner organs, the spine, joints and for the general promotion of good health. Its external healing properties are great as well, used (as with cayenne) to stop bleeding, added to hot water for soaking an infected or swollen area of the body, or made into a poultice and applied directly to the affected area to withdraw toxins and promote healing.

Golden Milk Recipe
The oil provides lubrication and energy to the system, while turmeric makes the bones and joints more flexible. It's a great bedtime drink
1/8 tsp turmeric
½ cup water
2 Tbsp almond oil (cold pressed)
8 oz (1 cup) whole dairy milk
Honey to taste
Seeds of 4 cardamom pods (optional: boil with turmeric)
Boil the turmeric in water for 8 minutes, stirring frequently. Meanwhile, combine the milk and almond oil and bring them to a boil. When the milk starts to boil, turn off the heat. Add the turmeric mixture to the milk and serve with honey to taste. The turmeric should completely surrender to the water. The cardamom seeds may be cooked with the turmeric for added flavor, but they are optional. You can also make this drink it frothy by putting it in the blender - use the lowest setting. Drink warm.

-Grace Of God Manual: Yogic Tools for Women based on the Teachings of Yogi Bhajan
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dadegroot



Joined: 25 Feb 2006
Posts: 81
Location: Cedar Creek, Qld, Australia

PostPosted: Wed Apr 19, 2006 10:33 pm    Post subject: Re: yummy drink -- and good for you Reply with quote

MJBodell wrote:
Turmeric
Turmeric comes from the root of a plant which is grown mainly in India, but it has been used in many countries for thousands of years as a healing food.


For the first time ever, I saw actual tumeric root in the supermarket yesterday. I've only ever encountered the powdered product. Is there anything one would usually use the root for, other than drying and powdering ?

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Dave
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MJBodell



Joined: 07 Nov 2005
Posts: 47

PostPosted: Wed Apr 19, 2006 10:36 pm    Post subject: Re: yummy drink -- and good for you Reply with quote

Is there anything one would usually use the root for, other than drying and powdering ?

--
Dave[/quote]

In India the Johnsons and Johnsons band-aids have tumeric on them... It is a very healing food.

I too have only seen it powdered. I use it in most of my food.

I love making a paste w/ it -- add a couple of Tbs and simmer down. I then can add the paste to either milk for a drink or to yogurt.
I love making tumeric jalapeno yogurt.
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Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2006 1:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yesterday I saw the actual tumeric root for sale. I was totally amazed, just not enough to buy it.

MJBodell,
I love that kind of information about herbs and spices and have read several books on the subject. It really is a fascinating subject. Thanks for bringing it into the thread!
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MJBodell



Joined: 07 Nov 2005
Posts: 47

PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2006 4:21 pm    Post subject: Palak Paneer Reply with quote

Palak Paneer (spinach paneer)

Paneer:

Boil a gallon of milk. When it starts to boil add the juice of two large lemons to it. Strain into cheese cloth. Twist cheese cloth to press paneer. Let sit until cool.

Palak:

1 bunch of spinach
1 onion finely chopped
1 can crushed tomatoes or two fresh tomatoes
3 inch piece of ginger
1 jalapeno
5 cloves of garlic
Salt
Cayenne
Red chili flakes

Blanch spinach and coarsely chop (best done in a food processor)
Put ginger and jalapeno into food processor and process.
Heat oil in a pan add ginger and jalapenos.
After they start to brown add coarsely chopped garlic. (cook for ~2 min).
Add onion and cook until brown. Add cayenne to taste.
Add spinach and salt. Stir and cook for a few min.
Fold in paneer.

ENJOY!
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MJBodell



Joined: 07 Nov 2005
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2006 4:25 pm    Post subject: Gobhi Aaloo Mattar (Cauliflower, Potato and Pea Dish) Reply with quote

Ghobi Aaloo (Cauliflower Potato Sabhjee)

Ingredients:
Oil
Cumin
Fenugreek seeds
Red Chili (can be cayenne)
Tumeric
Salt
Ginger
Jalapeno
Cauliflower
Potatoes
Peas

Heat oil in pan. Add food processed ginger and jalapeno (can be mixed together).
Add Cumin and fenugreek and heat until the seeds turn red.
Add tumeric and chili—heat for 1 min.
Add cauliflower and potatoes. Stir and turn head down – cover and add salt.
Add peas when the potatoes are ½ way completed.
Cook until soft.
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MJBodell



Joined: 07 Nov 2005
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2006 4:31 pm    Post subject: Dosa -- rice/ dal thin pancake Reply with quote

Dosa)
1 cup urad dal
3 cups rice (cheap is better b/c it has more starch)

Soak each item seperatley in water overnight.
Blend separately until fine.
Mix together.
Leave un-refrigerated for 24-30 hrs.

Heat frying pan to low heat– cast iron works best-
Place a little ghee (clarified butter) in pan and rub onion (cut in half) around pan (this prevents sticking)
At a low heat
Put 1/3 c of batter into center of pan with large serving spoon. Spread batter circularly until thin.
Raise heat until high put small amount of ghee around sides and some in the middle.
As the sides turn brown use the back of a metal spatula to lift all of the dosa up.
Flip for under 1 min.

Eat Smile

Great plain but also great w/ any vegtable dish.
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Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2006 5:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Last night I made dosas with the right daal, urad. It made a huge difference. I served them with a variety of fillings from spiced kidney beans, potatoes to a red curried chicken, (which was a bit more in the Thai style). Everything turned out great!

MJ, Thank you for the Aloo recipe. You rock!
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nima



Joined: 28 Nov 2005
Posts: 93

PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2006 3:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
One more thing I have found really, really helpful in cooking Indian meat dishes is my crockpot. I do not always have the time for the long, complicated cooking and braising process that really imbues the meat with all the spice and flavor. So, sometimes I go through the quick first few steps of frying the spices, browning the meat in the oil with them, then put everything in the crockpot for 10-12 hours on low. This gives the meat a different texture, but it completely works the spices in.


Hi, Faith. I was wondering if you had tips for converting standard Indian recipes for use in a crockpot. It's something I've thought about for a long time, but everytime I look at crockpot recipes, they always leave me baffled. I once thought about trying to make biryani in a crockpot, partially cooking all the ingredients, and then combining them in a crockpot so that all the flavours meld together, over a long period. Any thoughts?
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Feste



Joined: 03 Apr 2005
Posts: 32
Location: Berkeley, CA

PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2006 4:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This conversation is great! Indian is my favorite cuisine to cook.

If you want to buy another cookbook, I have been astounded by the breadth and depth of recipes from "The Art of Indian Vegetarian Cooking" by Yamuna Devi. It follows Vedic dietary guidelines, but please, don't let that deter you. I bought it because it was the only cookbook I could find with recipes for iddli, and have been amazed at everything I have made. It is a good 800-page volume, with recipes I have never seen at any restaurant.

One of my favorites is Charchari, literally char-flavored vegetables. You fry dal badi in a pan, then add vegetables and liquid and cook without stirring until the bottom layer begins to burn. Then you turn the heat off and put the lid on and let it rest for a few minutes, to soften the burned bits. Then stir it all together. It's delicious!

I've also become enamored of khichari and uppma, both dishes I've never seen at a restaurant, as well as yogurt karhi, which I eat over rice.

Mmm, I know what I'll be making for dinner...
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sumitsen



Joined: 01 Mar 2005
Posts: 10
Location: Mountain View, California

PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2006 5:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Has anyone used the South Indian cookbook "Dakshin" by Chandra Padmanabhan? I've had it for a year and it's one of my favorite cookbooks. I rave about this book to everyone, it's so good. Everything is simple to prepare and very authentic. I especially like the rasam and vegetable curry (poriyal) recipes and the coconut chutney. I use it to help get through my weekly CSA vegetable basket. The spices aren't that unusual (mustard, cumin, asafoetida, fenugreek) and should be easy to find in most places.

--Sumit
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Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2006 5:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Feste,
I haven't seen you around here lately. Welcome back!! The book you recommend sounds great. When I was a veg part of the time I was on a strict vedic diet, I loved it. Thanks!
sumitsen,
Thanks for the recommendation, I love the cuisine of South India. I will look into it.
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