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let's go to the movies
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madameshawshank



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Penrith (where jacarandas remind me of change), New South Wales, Australia

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 3:12 am    Post subject: let's go to the movies Reply with quote

voice sounds
an audience
each of us with anticipation as buddy
memories perhaps
lights out
we are there
in an imagination
in many imaginations
travelling within minds
pretty impressive eh

The Odd Couple
tears often dripping with laughter
A Man for All Seasons
why we do what we do
Belle du Jour
THAT story plus THOSE YSL clothes
a cinema remembered Sydney
seemingly giant palmiers 'n coffee
and ....ACTION!

(anyone into pod casts ~ filmspotting.net ~ two guys in Chicago who adore film and chat about recent releases + ~ it's a most entertaining listen ~ from the website this week:

How do you take the pleasure out of a "guilty pleasure"? Hire Michael Mann to direct. Unflappable and existentially fraught super cops Crockett and Tubbs (Colin Farrell and Jamie Foxx) are back in the big-screen version of Mann's executively-produced hit TV series "Miami Vice," but the kitschy cool of the original show has been replaced by a grim seriousness. Mann still displays a knack for using music, striking visuals and deliberate pacing to establish mood -- but Adam and Sam disagree on just how much that seductive mood makes up for the movie's weak dialogue and contrived plotting.

Also, Filmspotting continues its look at classic screwball comedies with Cary Grant in "The Awful Truth" and "Bringing Up Baby." 'Agonizing' isn't typically a word used to praise a bona fide 'masterpiece' like "Baby" ... and it isn't here, either. If there is a cinematic hell, Adam and Sam have surely just punched their tickets...
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sweetbabyjames



Joined: 05 May 2006
Posts: 357

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 3:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh, Bringing Up Baby. Philadelphia Story: "You'll never be a first-class human being or a first-class woman until you've learned to have some regard for human frailty."

Life is Beautiful, Sabrina, Chocolat, Spiderman 2! Yay, movies!
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 4:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've watched the Cary Grant and Katherine Hepburn movies from that era and really enjoyed them. Really enjoyed them. BUT they seriously had their heads up their keisters in some respects. That "you'll never be a first-class human being or a first-class woman until you've learned to have some regard for human frailty" speech was a defense of enabling alcoholism and womanizing. In Woman of the Year Katherine Hepburn, a successful professional, couldn't be redeemed until she was utterly humiliated and had to beg to be allowed to crawl back to her master. It's breathtaking to see how out front with the WASP male culture they (male writers) were.

Nevertheless, they represented the time and are absolutely fun to watch.

On the other end of the scale, anyone seen Being Juilia? Annette Benning is incandescent and it's so much fun to see how manipulative and screwed she is and how much pleasure it gives her to be the center of the universe. As an older woman nothing could give me more reassurance and genuine pleasure. Wink And there isn't a wasted performance in the entire film.
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sweetbabyjames



Joined: 05 May 2006
Posts: 357

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 4:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rainey, have to disagree with you there. At first I thought she was forcing herself into submission, but then I came to think in fact it's not so far off love. It takes being a bit humble, regardless sex, to love wholly. I thought it actually POST-feminist after that. To disregard airs, regard only what's real, like his love for hers. Class-less, sex-less love. The bit about her "virtue" is certainly dated, but I think that's just a nuance.

For me, there's offensive feminism that's so in-your-face as to come off absurd, and then there's human, non-feminist, non-masculinist dignity, where humans meet face to face. Then again, maybe I'm stretching the film to suit my point of view.
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
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Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 4:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, I acknowledge that her character was entirely democratic and refused to be contained within the restrictions of class and had something to learn about the give and take of a relationship. But there was not the same open equality, I think, about gender.

I'll watch it again with an open mind and see if I'm wrong about the enabling part. But, as a group, those films are quite pointed in slapping down the woman emerging in the post-war era.

Interestingly enough, Katherine Hepburn seems to mirror the same thing. She was a bright, privileged, independent, outspoken woman who utterly and voluntarily let herself be eclipsed to her relationship with Spencer Tracy. Even to the extent of enabling his alcoholism and, I think I've heard, some abuse.
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God writes a lot of comedy... the trouble is, he's stuck with so many bad actors who don't know how to play funny. -- Garrison Keillor
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Barbara



Joined: 13 Nov 2004
Posts: 899
Location: Gold Coast Australia

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 5:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rainey I saw Being Julia just last week. Really enjoyed it.
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Barbara
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 5:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

First of all, so glad to have this thread, thank Shank!

I'm pretty willing to forgive a lot for the sake of romance, intelligent conversation, and charm in a movie. (A LOT, Rainey)

Time mag. (August 2, 2006) has an interesting essay titled "Where Have All the Cary Grants Gone ?" "...the vicisstudes of show biz have done in the witty Spencer Tracy-Katherine Hepburn bickerfests, because they require people to actually pay attention." Much more to the article, but too sleepy tonight to get into this in depth.

I knew Madame S. would be aghast that I didn't see Brokeback yet--I know she's discussed it extensively.

One movie I just did not like--"Lost In Translation"--I'd like some opinions on that, might have to watch it again.
Yes, loved "Being Julia".
Sarape rents and watches old movies--he'll come talk to us, I'm sure.

Sentimental favorites--"Umbrellas of Cherbourg" "Day for Night" "Small Change". More recent films I was excited about--"Shattered Glass"
"SlingBlade" "The Bee Season". Enough for now, goodnight!


Last edited by gingerpale on Thu Aug 31, 2006 5:10 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 5:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

gingerpale wrote:
I'm pretty willing to forgive a lot for the sake of romance, intelligent conversation, and charm in a movie. (A LOT, Rainey)


Me too, actually. I think I saw those movies half a dozen times completely carried away by the fun and the characterizations before I listened to some of the dialogue and thought about what it revealed. But not to put too sharp a point on it. They're great movies and worth enjoying.
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Deste



Joined: 17 Aug 2005
Posts: 307
Location: Far, far away

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 6:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with Rainey about the type of woman Katharine Hepburn portrays in "Bringing Up Baby," especially. "Philadelphia Story" bothers me much less since she does end up re-marrying the man who actually knows her and wants her for who she is. The comic acting is brilliant fun, the rest, fodder for historical and sociological analysis.

The one actress I love from the 40s is Barbara Stanwyck, especially in "Ball of Fire," a version of the Pygmalion story. Even if the role of the femme fatale is troublesome, man does she do that good in "Double Indemnity" and on a lighter note, "Lady Eve."

As for the fascinating business between men and women on screen in earlier eras of Hollywood, "Some Like It Hot" is one of the most entertaining. It's about sex, more than sexist to me when Marilyn Monroe is admired while walking, "like Jello on springs!" Plus, it's famous for having perhaps the best last line in any movie. During the very last year of the 50s, there's a pretty interesting dynamic between the young career woman played by Eva Marie Saint, and Cary Grant in "North by Northwest." Yes, she need to be and gets rescued at the end, but in so doing, she rescues his character from the fate of his middle initial, "O" which he explains means nothing. Ad man empty to the core. Of course, Hitchcock is known for his interest in men and women and what women do to men and unfortunately, what men do to women. I still refuse to see the movies he made in the 60s for that reason.
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sweetbabyjames



Joined: 05 May 2006
Posts: 357

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 2:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Desk Set's a prime example of those disturbing tendancies. Much more disturbing than the reality is the romanticizing of it, and willing female participation!

Anyone seen Kitchen Stories? So touching.
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madameshawshank



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Penrith (where jacarandas remind me of change), New South Wales, Australia

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 3:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

thread away darlings...am having a ball reading your posts...
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sweetbabyjames



Joined: 05 May 2006
Posts: 357

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 3:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's novel being online at the same time as you, madame. What time is it on your side of the globe anyhow?
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 4:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't think Madame S. is aware of time or space, but I think (correct if wrong!!) when it's afternoon in Utah, say 4 o'clock, it is morning OF THE NEXT DAY in Australia. Like about 8 a.m. ??
But when Australians/New Zealanders say "summer", do they mean June July and August--or do they mean the 3 hottest months of THEIR year? Not clear on that. Too embarrassed to ask.

Now back to movies. Phew! was not prepared for analyzing the films to any depth at all yet! I was just gonna say "Made me laugh! "Made me cry! Made me sick!"

It simply doesn't bother me that women were treated differently then--people smoked in old movies too, and didn't use sunscreen. We know better now, that seems to be good enough for me. My sensibilites unruffled.

It kills me that while many of the people in old movies are dead,
you know ALL of the dogs are! Breaks my heart.

We will get into it when Woody Allen comes into this, I'll bet!


Last edited by gingerpale on Thu Aug 31, 2006 5:08 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 5:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Missed your tagging Small Change, gingerpale. I love, love, loved that movie! What a comprehensive essay on the delights, the confusion and the vulnerability of childhood! Truffaut hit every emotion and there's a truth to that film that is an awesome accomplishment.

My all time favorite part was the young girl who refuses to ditch the grubby teddy-bear purse and then organizes her whole building into "rescuing" her from the parents who "abandoned" her. Love how locked parents and child are in their own view of the suitability of the beloved purse and the kid's perfectly "reasonable" solution of quickly washing it out in her goldfish bowl. Shocked

Another French film from about that era that I really loved was The Two of Us. I don't know anyone else who knows it and I haven't been able to get a copy in any format in the last 10 years or so. I always thought it would have been the perfect companion to Schindler's List and wanted to pursue it.

In the film a young Jewish boy is evacuated from Paris (which is or will soon be occupied) to the rural farm of a crusty old man who is a distant relative of a friend or something and a dyed-in-the-wool anti-semite. The boy knows he needs to keep his Jewish heritage a dark secret to save his own life from an enemy who would willingly turn him over to the Nazis.

As the boy and the old man get to know one another and develop a real affection the "grandfather" warns the boy of the secret ways of IDing a Jew — so the boy can be protected from them. (I wish I could remember what identifying the signs were!)

Then, as the events unfurl they conspire to create each of these "dangerous" signs and the grandfather willingly adopts each one for the sake of the happiness and security of the boy who he never realizes is Jewish. In the film nothing matters except for the fact that they have connected and love one another — the devil Jew and the beast anti-seminte — genuinely and deeply for who they each are.

In it's way, this film (which I saw in French I couldn't translate but completely understood owing to the great humanity of the film) is a joyous negation of the arbitrary issues we set up to separate us.
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God writes a lot of comedy... the trouble is, he's stuck with so many bad actors who don't know how to play funny. -- Garrison Keillor
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sweetbabyjames



Joined: 05 May 2006
Posts: 357

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 5:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aha, I didn't know you were talking about L'Argent de Poche. I always thought of the film as Pocket Money. Small Change makes more sense. I had a college professor who introduced us to a bunch of flicks including that one and Mon Oncle, which is super funny.

I happen to love Woody Allen but I'm not sure why. If we're ever approached by aliens, I wouldn't want them to see a Woody Allen picture first.

Too bad, it looks like Netflix doesn't have The Two of Us.
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