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let's go to the movies
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 12:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

sweetbabyjames--yes, everything south of the equator (the southern hemisphere) gets the most sun at the opposite time of year that we do. You can demonstrate this to yourself with a flashlight (the sun) and a globe or ball of some kind. I was never sure how the seasons were named, though--thank you, Barbara!

Last edited by gingerpale on Thu Aug 31, 2006 4:56 pm; edited 1 time in total
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madameshawshank



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Penrith (where jacarandas remind me of change), New South Wales, Australia

PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 1:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock

it's 10.26am Saturday here 'n
2.26am in Paris
3.26am in Athens
8.26pm (Friday) in New York


such fun...

can imagine not only adults having fun ...children..

a brisk morning (an hour bike ride with a Winter's breeze for company) ~ there's fine snow on the mountains...far far south from here ~ seems so strange ...this cold weather, and at the same time the bulbs in our garden are in blossom...daffodils...jonquils...bursting at their seams..

now, as for this madame isn't aware of space or time...both Barbara and Judy would let you know I AM!!! Wink

not all the time ...some of the time...at least I know how to spell the words...
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 2:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well it's pretty well established that almost all of us would grant Mr. Grant complete access. My my my.
Everyone knows "An Affair to Remember" "To Catch a Thief" (and the other 99 fantastic ones) but "Mr. Lucky" and "Topper" are smaller and still charming as hell, if you haven't seen them.

Robert Redford I suppose is second honey in line, Warren Beatty a distant 3rd? Never liked John Wayne. My Rich says if he (Rich) were a woman, he would find Charles Bronson good looking--ye gods I guess he likes the way-too-rugged rugged type. Not for me, thank you. I actually shrieked when he told me that.

Soon I will see "Mrs. Henderson Presents" -- Ebert liked it, sounds good. I enjoy Roger Ebert's reviews, hardly ever bother with any others. He loves/knows movies more than I ever will. (Roger Ebert and Steve Allen the only 2 celebrities I ever sent a "fan letter").

I hope musicals aren't hated here, I still want to jump over trash cans in the street when I think about West Side Story. I watch that probably once a year.

Happy to have this thread so I can come here before or after a movie! I will shut up now.

"Spilling your guts is exactly as charming as it sounds."
(Fran Lebowitz)


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Barbara



Joined: 13 Nov 2004
Posts: 899
Location: Gold Coast Australia

PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 2:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

sweetbabyjames - it is bloody freezing today. I've been sitting by the warm fire watching all the cooking shows I've recorded during the week.
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Judy



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 1196
Location: buried under a pile of books somewhere in Adelaide, South Australia

PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 3:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's a bit warmer here in Adelaide, and quite nice in the sun, but it's most definitely still winter - no leaves on the trees, still almost dark at 6.30am.

On the other hand, we celebrate Christmas in summer and the majority of us have the hot roast dinner at lunch time. A few people have seafood or a BBQ, but most of us still go for the roast turkey.

It's very popular in Oz to celebrate 'Christmas in July', which is a nice excuse to gather people together and have another big feed, but without the ridiculous commercialism and going-overboard-on-presents that is an inevitable part of Christmas in December.
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sweetbabyjames



Joined: 05 May 2006
Posts: 357

PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 12:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You silly Ozzies with your unseasonable winter! Very Happy Christmas in July sounds good to me - any excuse for a holiday will do.

Mrs. Henderson Presents was very enjoyable. I love Dame Judi in anything. She might just be my favorite actress of all time. Confident and proud, yet humble and self-effacing and damn funny. Henderson makes you appreciate burlesque in a whole new light too.

As for leading men, I've always leaned toward Walter Matthau myself. Not that I'd complain if Cary Grant walked into my kitchen...I'm used to filthy beasts.

Musicals are grand! My favorite is Fiddler on the Roof, followed closely by My Fair Lady. My baby loves to sing "Dites-moi" from South Pacific with me almost every night.
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 2:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I recently saw A Walk in the Clouds with Keanu Reeves and Anthony Quinn. A lovely, lovely film set in immediate post WW2 California. Perfect for this crowd as Keanu plays a chocolate salesman who ends up romancing a woman whose father owns a vineyard and whose mother makes a squash blossom soup (zucchini??) as the first course of his first dinner. Magical scene when frost threatens the vineyard and all these people show up with these large wing like fans to send the heat from smudge pots across the vines---and great costumes!


Mrs. Henderson Presents was fabulous!
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sweetbabyjames



Joined: 05 May 2006
Posts: 357

PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 3:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dreamy! I'd forgotten A Walk in the Clouds. It reminds me of another film, can't remember the name, with Tom Hanks I think, in Greece? Sunny, warm, dreamy love with an angry father...
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 5:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is a Tom Hanks movie set in Jerusalem--something like 'no time for goodbye'? Maybe that's what you're thinking of?

I enjoyed T. Hanks in "Joe vs. the Volcano"..

Delightful: "Little Voice"


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Sarape



Joined: 15 Dec 2004
Posts: 583
Location: Anniston Alabama USA

PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 6:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Deste: I read and printed a hard copy of that article on Grant and his career when it first appeared -- think the time of 2005 a centenary of his birth. He certainly was my favorite actor for about a decade and I can see why women would want him more than any other man: watch him with Igrid Bergman, for example. But, he always played himself -- think the article mentions this and compares him unfavorably to Marlan Brando in that respect. Still, many film critics consider Grant the best of all time.

As I mentioned earlier, I'm finding more nuances in James Mason and E.G. Robinson now that I've seen more films. And I am beginning to prefer the earlier films of the 1930s -- early Hitchcock like The Jamaca Inn, The 39 Steps, the original version of The Man Who Knew too Much, and The Lady Vanishes. All of these were from the 1930s.

James Mason also had some very good early pre-1945 films in Britian.

It is interesting to watch James Mason and hear his early voice. You'll notice that the accent Carry Grant "adopted" is exactly James Mason's natural voice.
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georgia



Joined: 16 May 2006
Posts: 456
Location: california

PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 11:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi...Georgia here. I'm fairly new, having posted a half dozen or so comments without really (politely) announcing my entry into the C&Z society. I've been enjoying your movies thread--have been a Cary Grant fan since I was in utero, I think...Notwithstanding my lifelong love of CG, I don't think any man in the movies was handsomer than Gregory Peck at his best...or had a better role than Atticus Finch. (I campaigned my daughters to name their sons Atticus...to no avail...). And that voice! Then, of course, there was Daniel Day Lewis running all over western NY in buckskin in Last of the Mohicans (hated the book, which I had to read numerous times throughout my academic career...but the movie changed it so much, I didn't recognize it). Also, that movie proved that, with the help of great photography and background music, you could film a great, sexy love story where everybody stays clothed. Who knew? Thanks for this fun discussion...[/u]
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Deste



Joined: 17 Aug 2005
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Location: Far, far away

PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2006 3:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ginger: Great addition!

Sarape: I hear you, but you gotta understand, first, that the drooling over Grant is about the persona fashioned by the actor onscreen and its appeal to susceptible women--and men. It's about sex and beauty, but acting, too.

Since it's not my field, I'm not up on the literature. However, long ago a gorgeous male friend more obsessed with film than I told me about an essay devoted specifically to CG's skills as an actor; I think it included a detailed analysis of "North x Northwest," a film frequently scrutinized for its editing. The classic piece Kael wrote while still critic at *The New Yorker* was all I could find online.

It takes effort to appear effortless and actually the charmer displays quite a range of emotion within a given role, such as Roger Thornhill, and throughout his career. Good comic acting is under-rated (another truism) and as your comments indicate, you are fully aware critics think Cary Grant should have been given an Oscar for acting for at least one of his films instead of merely the Lifetime Achievement award from the Academy. Grant isn't always good. I just rented "Arsenic & Old Lace" recently and hated it due to the theatrical over-the-top acting, something one also finds in an early (first?) film with Katharine Hepburn where Grant famously does a back flip.

As for the idea of Grant doing a James Mason impersonation? The careers are so different. Grant's rise to rank of Major Movie Star happened independently and quickly. Shared British birth, instead, perhaps? Same culture's notion of class hierarchy and the clipped speaking style that goes with it? By the time the two fast-talkers worked together in "N x NW", as Kael remarks, Grant was a has-been. Hitchcock manipulates that aspect of the fellow ex-pat in successive roles where more vulnerability and age comes out and the skills are perhaps more evident because the roles are more dramatic. We take the work in screwball comedies for granted Wink

But, I repeat, we're really not talking about skills as actors. It would not be fair to stick purely to good-looking men nor men who make movies in Hollywood in that case. Nor are we talking reality, either, since another sign of Grant's acting prowess was his appeal. From what I understand of the man in real life and of his marriage to Dyan Cannon, he was an old-fashioned, domineering, difficult man's man who believed women should not have careers and were made to serve men.

Now to add to the list: Johnny Depp. Denzel Washington. Gael GarcĂ­a Bernal (Che in *Motorcycle Diaries*), Alessio Boni & Luigi Lo Cascio (*The Best of Youth*), Sergio Castellino (*Mostly Martha*), Marcello Mastroianni, Alan Rickman in *Truly, Madly Deeply*. Clive Owen. Voices of Richard Burton & James Earl Jones: melt!!!!! Brando we talked about and admired before, but he scares me. Musicals: *Singin' in the Rain* and *Meet Me in St. Louis.*
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simona



Joined: 11 Mar 2005
Posts: 696
Location: israel

PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2006 6:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are there no actresses in this world ? Beside CAtherine Hepburn who owes he inclusion in this thread thanks to Spencer Tracy?
Nobody mentioned his/her favourite actress. And then , we women complain of being treated unfair!!!!
BTW, I never liked Cary Grant, to whom I find a poster-like kind of masculinity, with few expressive acting nuances.

No more war
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Judy



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
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Location: buried under a pile of books somewhere in Adelaide, South Australia

PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2006 9:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Imelda Staunton in 'Vera Drake'

"Our" Cate Blanchett in anything, but 'specially as Katharine Hepburn in 'The Aviator"

Toni Collette
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sweetbabyjames



Joined: 05 May 2006
Posts: 357

PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2006 2:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can't believe I forgot to mention Mary Poppins for musicals. A smart movie for kids and grown-ups.
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