Chocolate & Zucchini Forum Index >> Back to Chocolate & Zucchini <<

 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages 
 RSS feedLast posts feed   RegisterRegister   Log inLog in 

favourite (or favorite :-)) quirky word
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Chocolate & Zucchini Forum Index -> Other things
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
madameshawshank



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Penrith (where jacarandas remind me of change), New South Wales, Australia

PostPosted: Sun Sep 10, 2006 11:07 pm    Post subject: favourite (or favorite :-)) quirky word Reply with quote

As soon as I came across "petrichor" ( Friday 2 April, 2004...wordsmith.org Wink )I simply fell head over heels in love with it!.
with thanks to wikipedia..

Petrichor (IPA: pět'ɹǐkəɹ) (from Greek petros, "stone" + ichor) is the scent of rain on dry earth; more specifically, it is the name of the yellow organic oil that yields this scent. The term was coined by two Australian researchers in 1964 for an article in the journal Nature. In the article, the smell is shown to derive from an oil exuded by certain plants during dry periods, whereupon it is adsorbed by clay-based soils and rocks. During rain, the oil is released into the air along with another compound, geosmin, producing the distinctive scent. In a follow up paper, the researchers showed the oil retards seed germination and early plant growth.

The scent is generally regarded as pleasant and refreshing, and is one of the most frequently cited "favorite smells". In desert regions, the smell is especially strong during the first rain after a long dry spell. The oil yielding the scent can be collected from rocks and concentrated to produce perfume. However, it has yet to be synthesized, perhaps due to its complexity. It is composed of more than fifty distinct chemical substances.

[edit]
References
I. J. Bear & R. G. Thomas: "Nature of argillaceous odour", Nature 201(4923):993-995 (Mar 1964)
I. J. Bear & R. G. Thomas: "Petrichor and plant growth", Nature 207(5005):1415-1416 (Sep. 1965)
[edit]

****************
"But, even in the other pieces, her prose breaks into passages of lyrical
beauty that come as a sorely needed revivifying petrichor amid the pitiless glare of callousness and cruelty."
Pradip Bhattacharya; Forest Interludes; Indianest.com; Jul 29, 2001.

It has been raining here for a few days....exquisite and welcoming since we're on water restrictions...'n my husband used "petrichor" in conversation..so delightfully as if it's the most easily used word in the universe...'twas fun!...language IS fun methinks

I look forward to learning of other quirky words...via you darlings..
_________________
"I've never accepted the external appearance of things as the whole truth. The world is much more elaborate than the nerves of our eye can tell us." - James Gleeson
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Judy



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 1196
Location: buried under a pile of books somewhere in Adelaide, South Australia

PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2006 6:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I love that smell, but had never thought there might be a word to describe it. Thank you for enlightening me, madame, oh fount of knowledge.

I wish I could give you a word in return, but can't think of any at the moment. Might have to raid World Wide Words.
_________________
Doing what you like is freedom
Liking what you do is happiness

www.cupcakerecipebook.com.au
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Debbie



Joined: 21 Feb 2005
Posts: 861
Location: Paris

PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2006 9:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow, Madame you have done it again!

What a fabulous word, and for such a fabulous smell too!
_________________
If you cannot feel your arteries hardening, eat more cheese. If you can, drink more red wine. Diet is just "die" with a "t" on the end. Exercise is walking into the kitchen.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Griffin



Joined: 09 Jun 2006
Posts: 932
Location: England

PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2006 2:38 pm    Post subject: favourite (or favorite :-)) quirky word Reply with quote

Petrichor does sound good too, like a sci-fi/fantasy villain! It is I, Petrichor the Pitiless!! Look on my works and no giggling!!

One I love is a stitched word from three: wotthehell! As in Mehitabel the alley cat's comment... 'wotthehell, wotthehell, toujours gai, Archy and always a lady...'

Also, Festoon, Gadroon and Repousse, which are silverware terms and so wonderful to my ear that they became Lord Festoon and Lady Repousse Overstruck in a story I wrote. Also a gentleman was in charge of the Light Gadroons! And that was before I found Chrismatory, Vinaigrette, and Ciborium!

Tristesse may have a sad meaning, but I always loved the sound of it. I used to think it would be a lovely name for a girl... er, and then I discovered what it meant!!! Ahem.
_________________
Confusion comes fitted as standard.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
tea leaves



Joined: 14 Dec 2004
Posts: 57
Location: boston, the home of the bean and the cod

PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2006 2:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

snarky and smarmy are two great adjectives for people's demeanors..
_________________
"Nobody can teach you how to make the perfect cup of tea. It just happens over time. Wearing cashmere helps of course."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
madameshawshank



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Penrith (where jacarandas remind me of change), New South Wales, Australia

PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2006 2:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ah Griffin..then you would have been able to say: "Bonjour Tristesse" Wink

I love your collection...fun fun fun


A popular playground joke in Britain states that the longest word in the English language is elastic because it will always stretch. Wink
_________________
"I've never accepted the external appearance of things as the whole truth. The world is much more elaborate than the nerves of our eye can tell us." - James Gleeson
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
clotilde
Site Admin


Joined: 24 Sep 2004
Posts: 443
Location: Paris, France

PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2006 6:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some of my favorites include: curlicued, discombobulated, balderdash, to gallivant, petulant, and axolotl. (I should try to use them all in the same sentence.)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Deste



Joined: 17 Aug 2005
Posts: 307
Location: Far, far away

PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2006 6:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Since I am trying to quell (that's a great word, isn't it?) my propensity for snarkiness (that's a mean word and one of my baser qualities Embarassed) and pretension (cf. words "quell" & "propensity"), I can't use it. I'm not British.

However, I think the word "gormless" is brilliant Wink. It sounds like what it means.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Griffin



Joined: 09 Jun 2006
Posts: 932
Location: England

PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2006 6:55 pm    Post subject: favourite (or favorite :-)) quirky word Reply with quote

Quote:
curlicued, discombobulated, balderdash, to gallivant, petulant, and axolotl


Clotilde, I do like discombobulated and gallivanting is a pleasure not to be missed! I love tatterdemalion too! Now then... as you have helped me, I shall have to give this a try...

My curlicued axolotl is never petulant when he gallivants, but when not gallivanting he becomes discombobulated and yells 'Balderdash!' in a petulant way. How's that?

Quote:
ah Griffin..then you would have been able to say: "Bonjour Tristesse" Wink

But then she would have said sadly, 'je part, helas pour Joie!' Smile

I like snarky and smarmy... I suspect that snarky was what the hunted Snark was on being discovered. The thought of that smarmy hunter just snarked the Snark.
_________________
Confusion comes fitted as standard.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
madameshawshank



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Penrith (where jacarandas remind me of change), New South Wales, Australia

PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2006 10:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

talk about wordplay! Very Happy
_________________
"I've never accepted the external appearance of things as the whole truth. The world is much more elaborate than the nerves of our eye can tell us." - James Gleeson
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Judy



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 1196
Location: buried under a pile of books somewhere in Adelaide, South Australia

PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

snarky and smarmy immediately conjure up Professor Snape. I guess 'conjure' is the right word to use, since he's a wizard.

Deste, I'm familiar with gormless of course, but then I started wondering ... so what would 'gormful', 'gormly' and other derivatives mean? And do they actually exist?
_________________
Doing what you like is freedom
Liking what you do is happiness

www.cupcakerecipebook.com.au
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Griffin



Joined: 09 Jun 2006
Posts: 932
Location: England

PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:49 am    Post subject: favourite (or favorite :-)) quirky word Reply with quote

Deste,

As a Brit, I hereby grant you legal rights to use the word Snarky and it's variants! And if the judge asks, you can tell him I said so! Tho' I'd keep your propensities under control, they wreak havoc if let loose on the furniture. You'd have to quell them then.

Judy,
Alan Rickman does snark well doesn't he? Alan Rickman, King of Snark!

Gormless is wonderful suggesting as it does a distinct lack of Gorms. I think if you have them, then you'd be Gormed or Gormful. If you were doing something that required all your common sense and it was working I suppose you'd be gormfully employed...!

I like the word Snickersnee, which is more famously used in Jabberwocky (also a great word - from a distance and when armed). It has the almost careless cruelty of swordplay implicit in the snickering.

Filberts I've always liked too. I think Filbert was the less famous brother of Albert.
_________________
Confusion comes fitted as standard.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
JM



Joined: 08 Jan 2006
Posts: 35
Location: Montreal, QC

PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 1:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great post. My faves:

persnickety

Philadelphia (I love the etymology)

futon

marshmallow

The latter two aren't particularly academic, but for some reason they just tickle me - all are a bit onomatopoeic.

As for "snarky" that is a favourite of my father - I remember as a kid getting warned "not to get snarky."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 3:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Griffin! Truly wonderful.

And who can live without the word tintinabulation!
_________________
Vivant Linguae Mortuae!!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 5:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My mother still warns me not to get 'snarky', and uses persnickity with strange frequency. I will not be adding them to my list of favorites.

Spindleshanks cracks me up.

Doppleganger is a good one I rarely get to say.

I love the flow of the French days of the week. Lundi, Mardi, Mercredi, Jeudi, Vendredi, Samedie, Dimanche. I am attempting to teach my husband to speak French and I love hearing him repeat the days of the week.

Champignon
_________________
"It's watery....and yet there's a smack of ham."

"It's hot ham water."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Chocolate & Zucchini Forum Index -> Other things All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
Page 1 of 6

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group