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New Kitchen
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Fri Sep 15, 2006 4:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

eatingbritain- Oh, I'm only too happy to examine my assumptions! Especially now, before I spend any $$$. I just ask questions because I want to understand. Like, I'm still thinking even with a dishwasher I still do an awful lot of prep by the sink where I can wash and also put debris down the disposal.

georgia- This portion of the process where everything is a possibility and nothing has cost me $$$ yet is intoxicating. This morning I costed out a single drawer dishwasher to go in the baking center so the big mixing bowls don't monopolize the whole dishwasher. But whatever I do or can't do in the baking area, I'll still go with a full size dishwasher in the kitchen part because we always manage to fill it up. ...even if I don't turn it on every day. And I don't think the drawers are tall enough to accommodate everything that might need washing. Kitchen Aid says they'll take big pots but they don't say anything about platters and cookie sheets and roasting pans.

I love the idea of a big, deep sink too. But I also want to be able to hang a dish rack and let things air dry without being splashed wet, or worse, dirty again. I saw the plumber today and he said I've got enough space for two sinks side by side, like a smaller one for draining the dishes and a larger one for prep and clean up. He thought that would go over big with a buyer.

The research is that after 4 years a big overhaul with upgrades can yield 84% of the costs back on resale. Our present kitchen is soooo inadequate, that I think, in our case, we might count on more that 84%. ....still, someone's got to pay for this and I haven't had a paycheck in 8 years. So at some point reality is gonna have to start taking hold. Wink
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queenla



Joined: 27 Oct 2005
Posts: 105
Location: Wycheproof, Australia

PostPosted: Fri Sep 15, 2006 8:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

congratulations again, Rainey!!!
In older age new kitchen's are like a new barby or bicycle. that thread that i think donna mentioned would be good. I also lust after corian but went with stainless steel and i do like it. My brother in law is a kitchen designer for the 'establishment' and is doing the rounds of my sisters in law. Hilary's is the latest and her bench tops are a kind of fake granite( oh I better get this right) but i think it is the 'new' tops. anyway I have a stove tip. When I bought my beaumatic 'cooking theatre' I loved it. But it was a domestic oven- i've learnt this after. It onyl goes to 250F. I believe the industrial ones go to 600 and I would love more heat- for those pizza sundays for one. So I would suggest getting industrial everything- often they look the same, but i reckon they would be better.
lights above work areas, sinks and in rangehoods are great too. and def. power points everywhere. Belle magazie have kitchen editions which i found good for ideas and then there are the recycling ways to accomodate- three bins, a sealed one for compost etc. so much to think about it is often best done horizontal with two drinking arms free.
good luck
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bennettsleg



Joined: 11 Sep 2006
Posts: 13
Location: Stuck on the gravy train, staring across the fence at all the lovely green grass

PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2006 12:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We live in a converted victorian house (circa 1900). We'll be "doing" our kitchen next year. It's only 4 years old but was installed by nincompoops on the cheap resulting in the D/Washer being connected to the hot water pipe, plywood fixed to the wall below the surfaces to create a smooth surface instead of plastering, the partition between the kitchen and the bathroom being painted chipboard instead of plasterboard etc so we're going to get:
Waste disposal as standard
Tall, tall larder fridge and larder freezer instead of our two small of each.
The tallest wall cupboards we can find (it's a relatively small L-shaped kitchen with 3metre high ceilings and we have ALOT of cooking items/store cupboard foods) with 3 or more shelving levels each.
Corner cupboard with doors that open up completely and allow clear, non-stretching, non-fumbling access right to the very back and that are fitted with staggered shelves that overlap in the corner bit, enabling maximum capacity storage, particularly for baking sheets, china serving dishes etc which are shallow and don't need a whole shelf height to store them...
Extra sockets on the underside of a few wall cupboards for intermittent use items (ice cream maker, fryer etc)
Very good lighting.
A proper mantle surround for the beloved range cooker.
A decent non-leaky floor
Separate bookshelves for all the cook books which can house a stool for guests to sit on (and keep out of the way Smile ) and for book browsing.
I reckon we can increase storage capacity 80% and fluidity & practicality 100%+.
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Sun Sep 24, 2006 1:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am paging through a British kitchen design mag. It's full of kitchens with purple cabinets, purple counters, purple paint and purple accent lights. Not a rich eggplant purple but a sort of dayglo mauve.

Is this a real trend or an editor with a slight obsession? I don't get it.
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Debbie



Joined: 21 Feb 2005
Posts: 861
Location: Paris

PostPosted: Sun Sep 24, 2006 8:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Much as I like purple... that sounds nasty Rainey. Let's hope it is just some weirdo designer Wink

Pestoman, wish we got along better and agreed on more things... Laughing Laughing bisous to you and Mrs Pestoman.

I agree wholeheartedly with the comment on industrial over domestic appliances. It makes sense if you want to get the most out of your kitchen and plan on really using it to its full potential.

Some of the kitchen magazines where fabulous, and some where not so good when I was looking. I had very definate ideas about what I wanted, and found the articles that proved the things existed.... then had to convince the manufacturer to do what I wanted - not what they wanted to do.

You will have to post photos when it is done so we can all share. How exciting!
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laurie_m



Joined: 03 Sep 2005
Posts: 24

PostPosted: Sun Sep 24, 2006 7:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think Ikea does great kitchens. We love ours, husband put the cabinets in by himself and he is NOT handy! We have Zodiaq countertops and love them , truly ez care, but I really like the Corian with integrated sinks. We have a very large sink that is 9'' deep and hides dirty dishes very well. One thing I wish we had done- you can put drawers under the base cabinets where the kick boards are- a great place to store baking sheets etc... Ikea also has great under cabinet lights, with extra power points in them that are really handy, and inexpensive.
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FoodiePam



Joined: 14 Sep 2006
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Sun Sep 24, 2006 8:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We finished our kitchen remodel about a year ago and still love what we did. We spent about 2 years before work started figuring out what we wanted. While we had both an architect and a designer we were still the primary points for the overall layout and design. To us a kitchen is so very personal that to just have someone else do it would not be sufficient. We had the architect because we were doing major structural work (added a lower level) and the designer was mostly a third opinion when Husband and I couldn't decide.

Things we did and are really happy with:

-dishwasher drawers. We put a single drawer by the main and island sink. Its just the two of us so we never fill a full dishwasher.

-Drawers for the pots and pans. Its so easy to just pull the drawer out and get to the needed pot.

-Pull out units with small shelves for spices. We have two of these with a cabinet in between. We simply open them up while cooking and all of the spices are available. To us its better than a drawer because the units are inset so that even when fully open we never walk into them and they don't get in the way.

-A walk in pantry. This is my favorite. It was raw wood shelving from floor to ceiling and a light that goes on automatically when the door is open. Every person involved in the construction except me constantly tried to decrease the size of the pantry but I withheld and kept it as big as would fit in the space we have. A year later its not completely full but definitely well used.

-Counters are granite which are extremely easy to clean-up and no worries with hot pots etc. One is a shiny finish and it never shows any mess but the other is matte finish. The matte finish is the only thing I'd reconsider in the entire kitchen because it does show water spots.

Hope that helps...
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Sun Sep 24, 2006 9:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

PestoMan- I missed your post until I went looking for it after Debbie referenced it. Soooo glad to see you posting! And thanks for those ideas! I think of you every time I have basil and even tomatoes because what's a tomato without basil?! Also every time I see my little sainte just above my computer monitor. ::smooches::

laurie- I have seen those toe kick drawers and hope I can work two toe kick spaces into the design. One for the junk drawer and one for the step ladder that is essential for all 5' 1" of me! One of the things that's making me certifiably nutz, tho, is that each cabinet company has something unique and must-have (like the toe kick drawers) that the others don't. But I can't have a kitchen of 7 different brands of cabinetry to get them all. Shocked

I have heard great things about Ikea cabinets. They're not our funky country kitchen style, tho, and I've developed a very negative reaction to the company that seems to be populated with an army of 18yos who have 49 different ways to say "tough ****" with a smile on their faces when you have a problem with their stuff.

I think I've finally decided on corian counter tops. Ironically, because there are new patterns that look much more organic and much less Las Vegas than the natural stone I can afford. I really wanted soapstone but it's at the top of the price structure here in SoCal. For what I'll save I'll have a bit of marble for the baking area. AND I'll get the integrated sink that strikes me as so easy to keep clean with no edges to trap gunk.

I'm still stuck on design software that will run on my Mac and let us see the effect and be sure it's what we're hoping for before we take a wall down. We also can't quite decide yet if the wall we want to take out (7' of it) is load-bearing or not because of the new addition that was added and runs out from the original wall at 90 degrees with much higher ceilings than the original ones.

I know the designer will be able to help us with that, but I haven't settled on one yet. I also want to keep that time/money down as much as possible by doing what I can. We're boosting the house's resale but also spending our retirement money when we're not at all certain how many more working years Steve has. Question

Best to everyone! I regret having so much less time to keep up right now.
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God writes a lot of comedy... the trouble is, he's stuck with so many bad actors who don't know how to play funny. -- Garrison Keillor
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Barbara



Joined: 13 Nov 2004
Posts: 899
Location: Gold Coast Australia

PostPosted: Mon Sep 25, 2006 1:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rainey another idea - I have drawers to the right of my stove that are the depth to hold oil and sauce bottles. They are at hand when I need them for cooking.
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Barbara
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Mon Sep 25, 2006 2:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Barbara- I'm thinking the oil and vinegar pull-out on one side of the range and the dried herb pull-out on the other. If I can have my baking area the spices can go in there.

I'm wondering if I'm falling in love with my ideas only to find out they're not possible or affordable or practical. Shocked Right now I have masking tape all over the floors to indicate how things open and colored tape on the faces of the cabinets to indicate what's cabinet and what's appliance or sink work area.

The hardest thing to visualize and anticipate the impact of is what will be gone and not replaced. Empty space is harder to imagine than something that's a different shape or color or purpose! It's kind of like when I hurt a knee and discovered to my great surprise that going down stairs is really a lot harder than going up!
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friend



Joined: 25 Sep 2006
Posts: 13
Location: indy>via singapore, ireland, d.f.mexico

PostPosted: Mon Sep 25, 2006 2:33 pm    Post subject: don't go with corian!!!! Reply with quote

We are in the final stages of our remodel (just have some trim and hardware to finalize) and have gone with Silestone for our counters. Silestone is quartz and is the same as Zodiaq that was previously mentioned.

Every kitchen person, designer, and owner of Corian warned us against it. It scratches very easily, you can not set a hot pan on it, and it will stain. The main advantage of Corian is that you can have a fully seamless countertop. If you don't believe me, go to Home Depot or your kitchen shop and drag your fingernails across a Corian top. It will scratch! If you are a serious cook, go with stone or stainless. In my opinion you will be disapointed with Corian.

Silestone and Zodiaq are only a few dollars less per sq. ft than Corian. You can have an under mount sink that will give you the same built in apperance and functionality as the Corian sink combo.
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Mon Sep 25, 2006 3:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Those are all of my concerns. But we have faux finished walls in the room that the counters will extend into. They're dark and they have a lot of color and texture going on in them. The stone that I've looked at (natural or aggregate) is busy with a lot of color and veining plus there's the shine that is so not me. I've considered honed, but it will add to the expense and re-introduce all the concerns about staining, and maintenance that stone is supposed to eliminate.

Soapstone was the one choice that gave me the organic, non-glossy, non-busy look I want so much but it's the highest price option in my area. I can't really afford it and I'm concerned that, while I invite the patina of use in a working kitchen, the next buyer won't.

ARRRRRGGGGGGHHHHHHH! Decision making is so tough for me! ...and each time I make one, I seem to back off within days. But I'm really grateful that you guys try my decisions and help me eliminate big, expensive mistakes. So (to borrow a phrase from my least favorite person on the planet), "Bring it on!"

Meanwhile, congrats on having gotten through this whole process! I hope your new kitchen will be the joy to you that you've been hoping it would be. May only yummy and restorative things come from it!
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God writes a lot of comedy... the trouble is, he's stuck with so many bad actors who don't know how to play funny. -- Garrison Keillor
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Mon Sep 25, 2006 3:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Donna and Barbara, you spoke well of corian. Did you experience the problems that friend mentions? I know if it scratches I can polish them out but that's not something I want to be doing more than occasionally. The heat damage concerns me most.
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friend



Joined: 25 Sep 2006
Posts: 13
Location: indy>via singapore, ireland, d.f.mexico

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 5:43 pm    Post subject: Silestone and Zodiaq Reply with quote

Silestone and Zodiaq are man made from natural quartz. Small pieces of quartz are tumbled together with resin to create a natural product as hard as granite yet never has to be sealed. Since it is a man made product several colors are available. None of them have large "veins" and some solid colors are available. IMHO, I would go with stainless if you don't like the stone. You may also want to consider butcher block tops.

I had Corian in my kitchen in Singapore and it was terrible! Stained, scratched, scorched, and knife marked I vowed never again.

If you are on a budget, decide on a tentative cabinet layout and have it drawn up and quoted. You maybe absolutely shocked at what the little ad-ons cost. We got our cabinets form Kraft-Made and little items like silverware dividers cost nearly a $100. Don't forget to budget for sinks, faucets, and hardware. Combined they can come close to a grand.

I guess my bottom line is, whatever you do don't get Corian and make a budget and stick to it. From my experience, it gets very easy to make emotional decisions over sound financial ones.
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Donna



Joined: 14 Oct 2005
Posts: 827
Location: Oakland, CA

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 7:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I loved my Corian for the 3 years I had it. I wanted something that was a continuous smooth surface and I got it. It was fabulously easy to keep clean. I had no difficulty with scratches at all. My contractor made a cutting board for me - out of the same Corian - and it's not bad looking even 15 years later. I was aware of the "hot pot" issue and made sure I had a trivet under pots when I put them down, so never had a scorch either. I am NOT the fussiest, neatest cook at all. I do not think that my level of attention to my countertops was much above what it is now with tile - and my counters looked pretty much the same from the day they were installed to the day we sold the house. Just one gal's opinion...

I do agree that one has to know what the limitations are going in - and the choice has to meet one's aesthetic AND utility requirements. You can talk as long and as loud as you want about stainless steel, but I'd rather choke than have it in my kitchen - because it just doesn't suit me!
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