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Griffin



Joined: 09 Jun 2006
Posts: 932
Location: England

PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2007 7:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I admit that David's signature is one I love and would also be a good one - Love is not love that alters when it alteration finds.

But then Billy the Shakespeare is full of great lines.
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madameshawshank



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Penrith (where jacarandas remind me of change), New South Wales, Australia

PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2007 8:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

'n then imagine the whole gig in Latin...there's something classy about Latin methinks Wink

I think this looks rather scrumptious: http://www.wonderfulgraffiti.com/photo_album.php?pid=127
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2007 6:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Griffin you've reminded me, I searched once for a mention of chocolate in Shakespeare-- http://shakespeare.clusty.com/

though lots of food is mentioned, chocolate is not. (No chocolate back then, or too scarce? Netitch..) I checked for "griffin"--it's there, of course!

Another beauty, from "Under Milkwood" -- Oh, isn't life a terrible thing, thank God!"
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Judy



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 1196
Location: buried under a pile of books somewhere in Adelaide, South Australia

PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2007 11:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ahhh, Under Milkwood. We saw a one-man performance of it last year and I can still hear his Welsh lilt, changing as he changed characters.

Madame, have you popped into the 'Knitting' thread? I'm waiting for you to tell us more about Sophie's knitting and your exquisite embroideries and cross stitch - yes, we have gone off on a tangent in that thread also.

Apologies for diverting this one - now, back to Wall Words.....
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madameshawshank



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Penrith (where jacarandas remind me of change), New South Wales, Australia

PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2007 12:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jude Darlin'...dippin' in here for a nanosecond...off for a wondrous day with a pal in the city...then meeting Soph for dinner 'n film..will certainly check the knit thread...for sure for sure

imagine if walls spoke...they could provide their own words...

saw a program last night ...part of series on god...images of the Wailing Wall...now THAT wall doth speak methinks..

if walls can have ears why not mouths Wink

hugs as ever...

there's some kind of graffiti at Pompei telling ancient passers by that the wine at so and sos is better than so and sos...at least that's what I recall from some reading..
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Rachel



Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 296
Location: Santa Barbara, CA

PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2007 2:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Madame, thanks for posting the Cavafy poem... I remember reading it in school around the same time we read the Odyssey. At the age of 14 I could only understand it on an intellectual level, but now that I've travelled loads and have lived abroad for the better part of six years I certainly appreciate it much more on an emotional level!

And yes, Pompeii is full of graffiti - not just pointers on which tavernas had good wine and which ones watered it down too much, but political messages and gossip (along the lines of who fancied who at the moment)... the more things change, the more they stay the same!
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georgia



Joined: 16 May 2006
Posts: 456
Location: california

PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2007 6:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rachel's point about shifting understanding as one grows (older and otherwise) is important. I frequently assigned the following poem as a critical thinking exercise to my college freshmen. It was interesting to see their response to it. I think it's not a bad lesson for young people to remember--and it's essential as we get older. It's written on the "wall" of my mind...

THE ART OF DISAPPEARING

When they say Don't I know you?
say no.

When they invite you to the party
remember what parties are like
before answering.

Someone telling you in a loud voice
they once wrote a poem.
Greasy sausage balls on a paper plate.
Then reply.

If they say We should get together
say why?

It's not that you don't love them anymore.
You're trying to remember something
too important to forget.
Trees. The monastery bell at twilight.
Tell them you have a new project.
It will never be finished.

When someone recognizes you in a grocery store
nod briefly and become a cabbage.
When someone you haven't seen in ten years
appears at the door,
don't start singing him all your new songs.
You will never catch up.

Walk around feeling life a leaf.
Know you could tumble any second.
Then decide what to do with your time.

-----Naomi Shihab Nye
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Griffin



Joined: 09 Jun 2006
Posts: 932
Location: England

PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2007 2:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
'n then imagine the whole gig in Latin...there's something classy about Latin methinks


Well, there is a book called 'Latin for the Illiterati' which is full of Latin words and phrases.

Morituri te salutant - we salute you before dying, is what gladiators told Caesar before the 'games' began.

Panem et circenses - bread and circuses, has always provided politicians with enough contempt for the rest of us.

Mortuis libamur (I think) is Let us drink to the dead, something for All Hallows Eve perhaps.

and my favourites... Cave Canem - beware of the dog!

and of course Domus Dulce Domus - Home sweet home!!

Georgia,

In my teens I had perfected the art of disappearing to the point that while people knew I was there, they never 'saw' me. I loved it. Of course, as Debbie will tell you the fine artists of disappearing are cats. Nobody disappears quite so brilliantly as a cat. I'd refer you to the expert, but ... as T.S. Eliot pointed out... Macavity's not there!
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sweetbabyjames



Joined: 05 May 2006
Posts: 357

PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2007 3:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Disappearing can be habit-forming. I lost my grandpa two months ago after having disappeared from him rather inadvertently for several years...now I'm like a gopher coming out of my hole, realizing all the other family I missed too.

What wicked webs we weave...or fail to!
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georgia



Joined: 16 May 2006
Posts: 456
Location: california

PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2007 3:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah, but please note the "fine art" part...It distinguishes the unimportant from the important. How we define those things for ourselves is up to us. Priorities and Balance. I worried when I posted this that I'd be taken for a curmudgeon or worse...one who is withdrawn from life. Could not be farther from the reality, and I must admit that I don't (can't) disappear from the mundane nearly as often as I'd like, but I still try to listen for the monastery bell (it's usually in the form of my granddaughter's laughter), and the older I get, I understand that damned leaf all too well!

Pax.
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sweetbabyjames



Joined: 05 May 2006
Posts: 357

PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2007 6:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh no, Georgia, I didn't mean to assume anything of the sort. Also didn't mean to put a blunt point on a delicate message! Embarassed

It is easy to care too much as it is to care too little. Sometimes the heart wants to be a pendulum. Nevertheless, there's no happier chap than Scrooge on Christmas morning.
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2007 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Georgia, think how long it will be before your little grandbaby understands what you mean by equating her laugh to monastery bells--(first she'll need to understand "monastery"!) -- Maybe we need people to become mature, but once we've formed ourselves, we are more self-sufficient?

Some of us are cabbages for sure, but you're not a curmudgeon!
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georgia



Joined: 16 May 2006
Posts: 456
Location: california

PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2007 8:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

no hurt feelings here...and i noted a typo in the poem...that's "like a leaf", not "life a leaf"...which i suppose works, too, come to think of it...
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madameshawshank



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Penrith (where jacarandas remind me of change), New South Wales, Australia

PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2007 7:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

dear ones...borderline tears after the past few posts!

what a joy this C&Z is!

am thinking of "life's time" ....maybe on each wall! inside home and out...to forever remind me ...that life takes its time...'twill never, on any any account, be rushed Wink now that's one serious lesson I've learnt!

hugs
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cigalechanta



Joined: 27 Dec 2004
Posts: 200
Location: cambridge, ma.

PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2007 1:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In my house porn (those beautiful books and magazines that show me unaffordable beauty) one magazine showed a home in Provence that had the legend, as they are called, "Live today because tomorrow may not come."
One year in Provence, I went to the chateau of Edith Mezard who is famous for embroided linens. Her boutique in the chateau is in Lumieres.
She was very expensive but I did buy a tablecloth, heavy brown linen embroided with a quote from the little Prince, Whoever ordered it never picked it up so I got it as bargain. I put drapery hooks on it and use it as curtain in my bedroom
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