Chocolate & Zucchini Forum Index >> Back to Chocolate & Zucchini <<

 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages 
 RSS feedLast posts feed   RegisterRegister   Log inLog in 

what's allways in your fridge???
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Chocolate & Zucchini Forum Index -> Cooking & Eating
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Dairy_Queen



Joined: 29 Jan 2005
Posts: 342
Location: Chicago and other places

PostPosted: Thu Feb 17, 2005 11:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm sure glad that I bought extra ink cartridges and paper for my printer the other day! Mead is my favourite drink, Judy, so the addition of honey to this recipe will make it a pleasure to drink. Thanks for posting it!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
birgit



Joined: 31 Jan 2005
Posts: 247
Location: Germany

PostPosted: Fri Feb 18, 2005 2:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Any idea why the lemons should be soaked in cold water?"

Dairy_Queen, I can only guess. Maybe they're easier to peel after soaking them, because you only need the yellow rind without any white particles.
For removing any wax, hot water would be more effective.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Fri Feb 18, 2005 2:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

birgit wrote:
For removing any wax, hot water would be more effective.


You know, the wax they put on produce is the same stuff that goes on cars -- carnuba wax! I don't think even very hot water gets it off and, of course, very hot water will change the texture of the produce. Probably in adverse ways. I know they sell special products to take wax of produce (how handy that they can not only adulterate our food to improve their own bottom lines but that, doing that, they present themselves with a whole new opportunity to sell us another product! Evil or Very Mad ).

I, personally, prefer to grow my own. I know everyone can't and, believe me, I can't grow enough to supply more than a small part of my own family's need. But at least I can make pickles because my cukes have never known what it is to be waxed! Shocked
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Dairy_Queen



Joined: 29 Jan 2005
Posts: 342
Location: Chicago and other places

PostPosted: Fri Feb 18, 2005 5:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

birgit wrote:
"Any idea why the lemons should be soaked in cold water?"

Dairy_Queen, I can only guess. Maybe they're easier to peel after soaking them, because you only need the yellow rind without any white particles.
For removing any wax, hot water would be more effective.


That's a good enough guess for me, birgit. Thanks, I'll go with that! Laughing
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Fri Feb 18, 2005 4:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We were at our friends V & L's for dinner one night and I noticed the lemons to be used on the fish were soaking in water so I asked V what this was about. She says she does it so they can absorb a bit of water to get them back to their just picked plumpness as they lose some juiciness through natural evaporation between the time of picking and the time they hit our market shelves here.
_________________
Vivant Linguae Mortuae!!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Sat Feb 19, 2005 11:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

birgit wrote:
Reading about Meyer lemons and preserving them I just stumbled across a recipe at http://www.leitesculinaria.com/recipes/preserved_lemons.html

my favorite lemon recipe comes from Ursula Ferrigno's book "Bringing Italy Home", one of my all-time-favorite cookbooks. It's limoncello, a traditional italian lemon liqueur. ...The recipe I've found at http://www.recipezaar.com/93851 comes very near. Ferrigno additionally recommends to start with soaking the lemons in cold water for an hour before peeling them.


Thanks for your helpful ideas, birgit. I put some lemon zest in vodka for the limoncello this morning. This afternoon I think I'll try preserving some of the lemons I still have. All the juice leftover from the limoncello should come in handy for packing the lemons in salt.

Now all I'll have to do is wait about 6 weeks to see how the limoncello turns out. I love lemon and found lots of recipes on the FoodNetwork for using limoncello. Wink
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Lady Amalthea



Joined: 18 Dec 2004
Posts: 136
Location: New York City

PostPosted: Sun Feb 20, 2005 1:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dairy_Queen wrote:
Mead is my favourite drink, Judy, so the addition of honey to this recipe will make it a pleasure to drink. Thanks for posting it!


I recently discovered Mead around Christmas and absolutely fell in love with it. I've always adored honey since I was a kid; any recipes for mead? I've never tried making liquor before as I assumed it would be quite difficult, but, for anyone who's interested flavored vodkas (with fruits or spices soaking in the vodka) are supposed to be delicious. We tasted one last summer at a Scandinavian restaurant and it was divine.
_________________
Don't forget the cannolis!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address
swan



Joined: 23 Nov 2004
Posts: 450
Location: a Dutchie in HongKong

PostPosted: Sun Feb 20, 2005 9:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I told my best male friend about this subjest and there came this very typical for him (I should have known, I know his kitchen, his fridge), very 'male'answer.....'" space" !!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Dairy_Queen



Joined: 29 Jan 2005
Posts: 342
Location: Chicago and other places

PostPosted: Sun Feb 20, 2005 6:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

swan wrote:
I told my best male friend about this subjest and there came this very typical for him (I should have known, I know his kitchen, his fridge), very 'male'answer.....'" space" !!


Of course, that would be space AND MGD beer, with some left over curled edges of pizza, right?! Rolling Eyes
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
swan



Joined: 23 Nov 2004
Posts: 450
Location: a Dutchie in HongKong

PostPosted: Sun Feb 20, 2005 9:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Of course, that would be space AND MGD beer, with some left over curled edges of pizza, right?!


Now that, dear Diary Queen, would be luxury for him... Wink
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
birgit



Joined: 31 Jan 2005
Posts: 247
Location: Germany

PostPosted: Sun Feb 20, 2005 10:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I put some lemon zest in vodka for the limoncello this morning. This afternoon I think I'll try preserving some of the lemons I still have. All the juice leftover from the limoncello should come in handy for packing the lemons in salt.


Rainey, that sounds great. As soon as I spot some untreated lemons in my wholefood store I think I'll join in, because I've filled nearly all my limoncello in little bottles to give as presents last christmas, and at the moment it's freezing cold outside -- which means it's high time to restock italian sunshine Cool
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Sun Feb 20, 2005 11:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wish I could send you some of mine, kiddo. The recipe called for 2 bottles of vodka so, being the good little drone that I am and definitely having 15 lemons on hand to use up, I got them both. It will take me the rest of my lifetiime to use up two bottles of vodka + syrup. ...especially if someone else's (Judy?) note is correct in predicting that the menfolk in my life aren't so likely to care for it.

One of the recipes I looked at (can't remember now if it was yours) suggested substituting Splenda for the sugar as an alternative. Although I'd love to save those sugar calories, I can't imagine what would be the point of boiling Splenda down to a syrup and I wouldn't really trust how it would behave in the bottle over time. So, when I get to that step, I'll do the regular sugar syrup.

Do you happen to know if it's important to store it in the freezer? My freezer space is extremely limited. I'm thinking that, it being completely alcohol and sugar there isn't any reasonable possibility of spoilage and the freezing is a serving suggestion that I can just implement in the hour or so before serving it.

Also, if you've done this before, how critical is it to be sure every trace of pith is removed? I had micro amounts on each and every peeling. Think this will spoil it? I could always taste the infused vodka before I taint the second bottle with it if a trace of pith proves to be too much.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
birgit



Joined: 31 Jan 2005
Posts: 247
Location: Germany

PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 2005 12:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you, Rainey, for thinking of me Smile but you'll see, it'll disappear faster than you think because it's like an essence you can put into cake doughs for example, or into desserts, ... or throw a big italian party ...

Splenda isn't available here, but even if it would, I'd always take sugar because of preserving reasons. Also I don't store the limoncello in the freezer, and until now nothing bad has happened. I've sterilized several little bottles (200 ml each) and their caps in very hot water, filled in the limoncello and closed them tightly. The bottle I'd opened I've put into the freezer, took it out once and forgot about it for quite a while and it's still ok, so I think it's alright that way, and simply the coolest place you can find will be ok.

Compared to another german fruit-alcohol-mixture called "Rumtopf" which boomed in the seventies (putting several fruit into normal rum (40%?), little by little over the year as soon as they ripen, uncooked and always with the same weight of sugar and then pouring some 80% rum on top for keeping them ok) I think limoncello incorporates nearly the same percentage of alcohol and sugar to keep well.

Giving the most of my little bottles as presents I didn't have to think about keeping them for a very long time, but if, I might keep a little of the high percentage stuff and pour it on the surface of the filled bottles I would want to keep longer.

I also didn't get rid of all the white stuff on the zest, and it was ok, too.

Concerning the issue of menfolk and lemon, hm, I don't know, maybe it tastes too healthy Confused Would be a nice excuse for a little journey to italy do do some empirical research ....
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 2005 6:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, birgit! Doing some research, I found a Nick Margheri recipe for limoncello babas (babkas). They sound sensational and I can hardly wait to have the limoncello to bake them. They sound pretty much like babas au rhum but the lemon flavor sounds more interesting to me than rum.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Corey



Joined: 23 Feb 2005
Posts: 12
Location: Keene NH, USA

PostPosted: Fri Feb 25, 2005 12:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So seeing as how I enjoy experimentation so much, the occupants of my fridge tend to change fairly often, with these exceptions.

Milk, we like it to drink and we like it in our tea, and the occasional roux.

Butter...really do I even need to explain this one.

Eggs, ah the ubiquitous egg. The thickener, the emulsifier the cullinary chameleon...what cant you do?

Other than that it gets a little chaotic, we almost always have mayonaise and mustard and ketchup (we are american after all), and we nearly always have chipotles on hand.
_________________
Whiped, Beaten, Denatured: Journey of an aspiring chef. http://denatured.greenkri.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Chocolate & Zucchini Forum Index -> Cooking & Eating All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Page 3 of 4

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group