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Fondant icing...
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Richard Leader



Joined: 22 Feb 2006
Posts: 77
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2007 2:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I never know the difference between icings, but what I will say is that my wife has now made wedding cakes for two of our friends (and is desparate for this not to become a tradition!).
The making of the cakes is fine - but she was concerned about the decoration - so all she did was to buy pre-rolled marzinan and icing, cover the cakes then decorated with fresh flowers - looked very nice!
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climbeyalex



Joined: 22 Nov 2005
Posts: 92

PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2007 7:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Crisco makes me shudder because it looks so white and slightly unnatural and I'm one of those people who like my food as natural as possible. I did try out a frosting recipe last week, a bit of softened non-hydrogenated margarine, tons of icing sugar and enough water to make it a smooth, shiny paste. It worked out ok, except I could taste a bit of powderiness in it. but it dried beautifully and still tasted yummy.
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Last edited by climbeyalex on Mon Feb 07, 2011 12:30 pm; edited 1 time in total
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MelC



Joined: 13 Jul 2005
Posts: 64
Location: Ontario Canada

PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2007 1:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are a LOT of different rolled fondants available out there!!! Wilton makes one that is particularly noxious... I had one person ask if it was even really a food product (some cake friends and I did a comparison of several brand that are available here in Canada)!!! Personally I always use Mill Lane fondant from www.creativecutters.com , but there are a lot of other brands that are pretty good too. Chocopan is a nice one (tastes like white chocolate!) and I've heard good things about Fondx.

There are recipes available to make it from scratch... which is usually the tastiest version, but is not quite as easy to work with as the commercial varieties. You're welcome to send me an e-mail if you're looking for the recipe!
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Debbie



Joined: 21 Feb 2005
Posts: 861
Location: Paris

PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2007 10:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry, on holidays and not logged on to check often... Embarassed

A half day or so would be more than good enough! I had ours done a few days before the wedding and then I decorated it the day/evening before. The top had formed a very very fine hard layer (I would say less than paper thin) but underneath it was still softish and more moist than the usual rolled icing.

Don't try to be clever (or stupid?!) like me... I decided to decorate our cake with silver cachous in the pattern that was engraved on my husbands wedding ring... Shocked After sitting for hour upon hour positioning the beads with a pair of tweezers and cake glue I could have quite easily thrown the cake out the window! Laughing Not a good thing to do the day before the wedding...

Good luck and I hope you have a wonderful day and everything goes smoothly. Just remember that everyone is there to share your special day, and if the cake has to have "yucky" tasting/texture icing to stand up to the heat - then it is a small matter which will be easily swept away with your other wonderful memories of the day. Sweat the big things, not the small (and don't use my hairdresser - she was horrid!.. Wink )
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Raven



Joined: 07 Apr 2006
Posts: 46
Location: Vermont, USA

PostPosted: Sat Jun 02, 2007 4:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

climbeyalex wrote:
I have a couple of words to describe my last few run-ins with crisco: Engine Oil. I could probably grease my bicycle with that stuff.


For country dwellers or visitors: Crisco is excellent for removing pine pitch from the hands and from children's hair. Pine pitch doesn't wash off, but the Crisco emulsifies it, and the whole mix can then be washed off with plenty of soap.

(Of course, any vegetable oil will do. But my mother always used to use Crisco on me, and I used it on my sons when they were young.)

So Crisco does have redeeming social value after all, even though its palatability is nil.
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Sat Jun 02, 2007 9:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

About Crisco--I have questions! Julia Child used it. Rose Levy Beranbaum, though she prefers butter, says that it is easier to handle, browns better, is just as flaky, and is more tender (giving the feel of "lighter") when used in piecrust. Also, she says it holds its shape better when baked, (protecting those decorative crusts I can't do!)
Crisco is pure vegetable oil, yes?-- is there something inherently wrong with Crisco?
I read that Crisco melts at 106F, butter at 88 to 99 depending on the fat content. I suppose this could be important if you must have frosting roses on a cake in a very warm place.
Also, I've mentioned icing and piecrust, but what about frying-- chicken, home fries, etc.--any reason to insist on other oils over Crisco?
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2007 12:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Isn't it full of transfat? I think it's solid in form because it's hydrolized and that means transfat.

That said, I think it's in Alton Brown's pie crust recipe too. ...there must be some reason I have some in my pantry.
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Banker & Baker



Joined: 31 May 2007
Posts: 5
Location: Sydney, Australia

PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2007 1:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Like MelC, I too have found quite a difference in taste between brands. I did once try a white chocolate flavour one (a local Australian brand) and it was horrid so worth buying a small package to test before going the flavoured variety.
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sweetbabyjames



Joined: 05 May 2006
Posts: 357

PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2007 4:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've never used anything but butter in my pie crusts and love the result, especially compared to most store-bought or almost anyone else's bland albeit flaky crusts. But, I did hear someone once recommend replacing half your butter with crisco for a nicer texture and I'm always tempted to try it (but afraid to waste my hard-earned berries in an inferior crust). A little less choresterol couldn't be a bad thing I suppose, as long as you still have the flavor...
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Donna



Joined: 14 Oct 2005
Posts: 827
Location: Oakland, CA

PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2007 7:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I tend to use all butter for my pie crusts - because I cannot manage the idea of lard - even though that's what my grandmother used. I gives great flavor and if you let it rest in the refrigerator for an hour (or 24) it's very tneder and flaky.

Melissa Clark did a pie crust marathon last fall using a variety of fats - and the vegetable shortening (Crisco) came out the worst of the bunch. Here's the link to the NYTimes article:

http://select.nytimes.com/search/restricted/article?res=F40B17FD3C5A0C768DDDA80994DE404482

Lots of VERY interesting ideas - peanut butter crust, anyone?
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climbeyalex



Joined: 22 Nov 2005
Posts: 92

PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2007 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Crisco is pure vegetable oil, yes?-- is there something inherently wrong with Crisco?


Crisco is hydrogenated vegetable oil, I believe. And to hydrogenate vegetable oil into solid form, you need to introduce nickel and hydrogen to it. And its chock full of trans fat. I've tried and much prefer emulsified vegetable oil shortening. It's much better than crisco but not much better than butter.
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