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All-apple-things!
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Mister Choc



Joined: 03 Aug 2007
Posts: 19
Location: england

PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2007 3:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I realised my last suggestion was just an apple pie.
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2007 8:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm sorry to say I haven't read this thread tho I love baked apples. But this article about heirloom apples (which I also haven't had time to read) was in yesterday's LA Times Food Section http://www.latimes.com/features/food/la-fo-apples12sep12,1,2159365.story?coll=la-headlines-food&ctrack=2&cset=true and may be helpful or interesting.

They also included these recipes for Baked Apple Ice Cream and a cake called Boozie's Apple Cake which has no booze:
http://www.latimes.com/features/food/la-fo-applerec1sep12,1,7035549.story?coll=la-util-features-food&ctrack=3&cset=true
http://www.latimes.com/features/food/la-fo-applerec2sep12,1,7428766.story?coll=la-util-features-food&ctrack=4&cset=true

I think they both look good but haven't tried either yet.
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FoodSciGeek



Joined: 19 Aug 2005
Posts: 143
Location: Vancouver

PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2007 8:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for all the great ideas everybody. I'm on Friday snack duty at the office tomorrow, and was planning on a couple of apple things. I'm going to have to pick and choose from all of these. I have some 16 year old cheddar that I'm going to serve with my apple treats (yum!)
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2007 10:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

(Hello FoodSciGeek! It has been awhile since you've been here!)


A perfectly delicious raw apple treat:

Mix good balsamic vinegar (or even mediocre, like I can afford) with brown sugar. Sprinkle in some fresh ground black pepper. (All to taste.)
Use as a liquid dip for crisp apple slices. Very nice!
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FoodSciGeek



Joined: 19 Aug 2005
Posts: 143
Location: Vancouver

PostPosted: Fri Sep 14, 2007 12:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good to be back Gingerpale. I've been traveling a lot on business doing geeky food scientist stuff. That hasn't stopped, but the fall always re-invigorates my passion for cooking. All that lovely comfort food.

Swan, on the dutch apple pie, what size springform are you using. I have a gianormous one, so I'm wondering how much I'll have to increase the pastry. Maybe I'll just make double and save any extra.
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climbeyalex



Joined: 22 Nov 2005
Posts: 92

PostPosted: Fri Sep 14, 2007 4:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What a coincidence, I've been on an apple cake making kick for the last week or so. I think it came from Nigel Slater's book The Kitchen Diaries, or some vague memory of using 100g of flour butter and sugar that he mentioned in the book. Anyhows...

Apple Cake

100g butter, softened
100g flour
100g fine sugar
1 egg
1 small apple
4g baking powder
a teaspoonful ground ginger (More if you like it)
1 teaspoonful vanilla
pinch of salt
2 tablespoonfuls milk

Peel (optional) and core the apple. Slice into thin slices. Grease an 8 inch round cake tin generously, arrange apple slices on the bottom of the cake tin. Combine flour, baking powder, ginger and salt together. Beat butter and sugar together until light and fluffy. Beat in egg and vanilla essence. Fold in flour in three batches. Add milk when mixture starts to look too dry. The batter should be slightly stiff but still pourable. Add more milk if it's too stiff, otherwise don't bother about it. Pour batter into prepared tin. Spread to cover apple slices. Cover tin and bake at 190 degrees celscius for about 20 minutes or until a tester comes out clean. Uncover and let it bake a bit more to brown if you like or just take the thing out and cool it and invert onto a plate.
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Last edited by climbeyalex on Mon Feb 07, 2011 12:33 pm; edited 1 time in total
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Fri Sep 14, 2007 2:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

FSG--welcome back! 16 year old cheddar--I think I'm going to swoon!
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Fri Sep 14, 2007 4:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, about that 16 year old cheddar--where in the world did you get it? Is it hard like grating Parmesan now? Is it very different from the cheddar we are familiar with? (about 5 years is probably the oldest I've ever had) I can't imagine something made from milk lasting for 16 years!
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FoodSciGeek



Joined: 19 Aug 2005
Posts: 143
Location: Vancouver

PostPosted: Fri Sep 14, 2007 7:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I ended up making Gingerpale's Cake and Swan's Dutch Pie (with the rosemary - very nice and subtle, I might even use more another time). They were a hit with my co-workers.

Now the 14 year old cheese, that is something. It certainly isn't easy to come by. It came packed in a can and is to be refrigerated to prevent any bad bugs from growing in it. It was given to me by one of the suppliers that provides us with cheese based seasonings. I only brought in half, and vacuum sealed up the rest for another day. I might even freeze it as I will be heading out on the road again.

With that much age, the texture of the cheese is quite dry and crumbly. The acids crystalize so although the cheese flavor is very strong, it is not too sharp. Think of the strongest cheddar you've ever tasted, but smoother in flavor and dry in texture with some crunchy bits. Like some of the cheese you can buy in other parts of the world with salt crystals.

The cheese disappeared before the pie was finished (although it was a big pie). I'm glad I didn't bring the whole cheese in, or my greedy co-workers would have eaten it all, and left none for my next dinner party!
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Fri Sep 14, 2007 7:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh, the cheese sounds fantastic!
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srk



Joined: 09 Apr 2005
Posts: 85
Location: Berkeley, CA

PostPosted: Fri Sep 14, 2007 10:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting comment about hard sauce getting its name from being solid when cold - I always assumed it was due to its alcoholic nature (like hard cider, while we're thinking about apples).

Incidentally, if you're not appled out yet, the New York Times ran a lovely savory baked apple recipe sometime within the past year. The main gist is to slice some apples, put them in a pan, add some white wine, fresh garlic, salt, and pepper, and bake until the apples are soft and browned and the wine has reduced to a lovely golden juice. This dish became an instant favorite of mine the first time I tried it.
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Debbie



Joined: 21 Feb 2005
Posts: 861
Location: Paris

PostPosted: Sat Sep 15, 2007 7:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Swan, you wanted chutney recipes..... this is one of my specialities

Debbie's Delectable Delights - Cranberry, apple and chilli chutney

apples diced (peel or not - your choice) diced
dried cranberries (one packet)
2 or 3 chilli (whatever you can get) finely chopped
sultanas (dark or golden)
teaspoon grainy mustard (please don't use smooth mustard - it doesn't work)
small piece of fresh ginger ground
2 or 3 cloves
one large onion or a few small ones, in small dice
1 clove garlic ground
1/4 cup dark brown sugar (approx)
1/2 - 1 cup good vinegar (either eschallote, red wine or apple cider)
raw hazelnuts roughly chopped

Mix apples, cranberries, chilli, ginger, onion and garlic in large saucepan over medium heat, till well mixed.
Add other ingredients (except hazelnuts) and mix very well
Let cook over low-medium heat till apple is collapsing and most of liquid is absorbed. You do want a small amount of liquid in each jar to keep it moist and spreadable.
Add hazelnuts and mix well. When hazelnuts are hot it is finished.
Pour into sterilised hot jars and seal immediately
Let sit for 2-3 weeks before eating with pork, chicken, cheeses or anything you want! Store in fridge after opening.

I add 1/2 cup of vinegar and then see if I need more.
If liquid evaporates too quickly add a little more vinegar or peach or apricot nectar (apple juice may work too - but no other juices do).

No amounts for apple have been included and other amounts are approx. Taste your fruit and see what you think you need to add for the spices. I usually use about a kilo of apples, but it is up to you. Some people prefer more onion than apple in their chutney.

This has been one of my most popular chutneys and sold out in half an hour last year at the chutney sale. I have had numerous requests to make it for this years sale. I am ok with it being passed to others so long as you credit my label. All the chutneys and jams I make are for charity so it is important that appropriate credit is given.

Enjoy!
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Sat Sep 15, 2007 8:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Deb- You use the nuts raw? With their skins still on?
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swan



Joined: 23 Nov 2004
Posts: 450
Location: a Dutchie in HongKong

PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2007 9:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Debbie - thank you, that sounds absolutely yummie!
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Debbie



Joined: 21 Feb 2005
Posts: 861
Location: Paris

PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2007 9:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

For chutney, yes. If you use roasted nuts the flavour is different. I use shelled hazelnuts, but with the papery skin still on. It gives a really nice earthy flavour and depth to the chutney. If you wanted you could remove the papery skin, but it is perfectly edible and does add to the flavour.

I also roughly chop the nuts so you get irregular sized chunks. Don't chop them too fine or you might as well not bother using them at all. They give a chewy/semi crunchy texture to the chutney which is quite nice. After a few months they are softer than when they are fresh, so you will not have a super crunch, but you will notice the nuts in there.

We are lucky that a friend has a hazelnut tree in their garden and I receive fresh hazelnuts as a gift each year. No pesticides or other nasties.
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