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Making a decent scone
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2007 2:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd say in the US the difference is sweetness and shape. An American biscuit is usually round but occasionally a freeform shape with lots of tiny peaks as a result from not being kneaded but being dropped directly from the spoon. An American biscuit also never has sugar. ...unless, occasionally, it's made for a shortcake as in strawberry shortcake.

Otherwise, the texture and method are exactly like a UK-type scone which I understand, traditionally, to be patted out like shortbread and cut into wedges before baking.

Donna- Far be it from me to argue with the method of a UK-type or, in fact, anyone who didn't just learn to make them effectively until the last week or so... ;>
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msue



Joined: 18 Dec 2005
Posts: 368

PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2007 12:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jenyfari, scones are usually sweeter than biscuits, although the discussion of a savory scone really blurs the lines somewhat. To quote from the Joy of Cooking, "Scones are sweet, rich biscuits that are usually made with cream as well as butter. Eggs add flavor, rich color, and a slightly cakey texture."

One of my favorite markets here sells sweet scones as well as "jalapeno scones", which are definitely savory. They aren't very good, however. One the other hand, a good ham and cheese biscuit....YUM.
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Debbie



Joined: 21 Feb 2005
Posts: 861
Location: Paris

PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2007 2:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is interesting that everyone seems to think of scones as "sweet". That is not what I would have said at all. I grew up on scones that where neither sweet nor savoury, until you put your preferred topping on them.

An old fashioned flat blade knife is one that has just a sort of spatula type blade and no serrations. Mine has a bone handle, but I am sure they come in other handle types too.

Scones are also rounds that are cut with a scone cutter before being baked on a tray. This idea of a big blob in the middle of the tray that is cut into wedges before baking is not something that I was aware of until recent years. I think it is more of a trend thing, or possibly taken from the way that Irish soda bread is made?

These days I think there are probably more recipes and methods of making scones than we could imagine. I would hesitate to say that any of the recipes found in modern cookbooks are the original scone. You would need to get out your grandmothers handwritten cookbook I think.

The Women's Institute is the "Country Women's Institute". It started as a way for country women to get together, raise money for things needed in rural communities etc etc etc. They do some fabulous work in Australia for remote and rural communities. Baking is one of the things that they are most well known for.
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2007 3:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe the wedges are part of a trend that waxes and wanes. But that's how I first had them 50 years ago.

I didn't mean sweet as in sweet. But there isn't any sugar at all in an American biscuit. You wouldn't find any fruit in it either. But you could well see it served with honey or jam.
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msue



Joined: 18 Dec 2005
Posts: 368

PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2007 3:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Four gold stars to Rainey for this wonderfully easy and tasty recipe. I just made and served them to good reviews. ("Pretty dang good", from a sleepy spouse, who is on his second scone right now.)

I did not grate the frozen butter after all - seemed unnecessary when cutting it into bits was so easy. Next time I intend to make the basic recipe the night before serving, down to the point of forming circles of dough and cutting them into wedges. I'll place the well-wrapped shaped dough into the freezer overnight, and bake in the morning.

Anyway - excellent scones, perfect for sharing with neighbors who so kindly offered me a margarita after work earlier this week! Smile Smile
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Debbie



Joined: 21 Feb 2005
Posts: 861
Location: Paris

PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2007 5:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The recipe I know has no sugar in it. Fruit is a "fancy" addition that would sometimes be added by my Mum and Great Aunt as a treat. Those ones were good to take to school for morning tea when we were kids... Wink

I used to love when they would add chopped dates to the mix. It was such an exotic thing to have in the cupboard and we were never allowed to just eat them as dried fruit. Nowdays, of course, I indulge in dried dates whenever I want... Laughing

After all this talk about scones I am going to email my Mum and ask her to send me the recipe so I can whip up a batch. They will make a good snack for work next week. Might even add some chopped dates to the mix!! Laughing
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2007 8:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Delighted it worked for you, msue. Did you do the lemon ones or the ginger ones from the link. There are an awful lot of really delicious looking things at that site at the link. Scones and much more.

Interesting idea about mixing up and forming the scones and baking the next morning! I hope you'll pop back and say how that works. I'm guessing things leavened with baking soda would do OK but I wonder about things leavened with baking powder which begins to act in contact with liquid. Wonder if it could hold the air while frozen or if the action becomes suspended at freezing temperature. Right now, I can't even remember if there was baking powder... Hope to hear about your results.
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madameshawshank



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Penrith (where jacarandas remind me of change), New South Wales, Australia

PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2007 1:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

my pleasure dearest Debbie!...rather nice to be back in c&zland...sometimes life gives us days ..and nights! to work on...ah well...

ok..to the topic suggests Judy!

oven needs to be 220 degrees...methinks that's sort of 428F..

3 cups self-raising flour..add a cup of lemonade and a cup of pure cream..runny cream..even typing the word 'cream' sends me to the stars and back...I worship the Dairy Queen...gently mix to form a soft dough.

knead a little...on a floured surface...I like to keep mine close together on the tray..I love the soft edges of a scone..brush with a beaten egg..or milk..

10-15 minutes...

my beloved Nana baked scones every Sunday morning...she lived with us...I can still picture her with the apron all floury...those gorgeous scones!! butter and ..wait for it...sugar ...crumbs there's a can of lemonade somewhere in the kitchen...methinks scones are on their way...all invited...cyberspace scones are plentiful for all methinks... I think Nana would be smiling at the very idea of LEMONADE scones!

have read that soda water can be used instead of lemonade...not so sweet scones result...

all types of jam available at this cyberspace kitchen table...
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msue



Joined: 18 Dec 2005
Posts: 368

PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2007 4:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rainey, I made an adaptation of the lemon scone recipe you shared. My lousy lone lemon didn't make enough zest, so I added the zest of one juicy tangelo. I needed a bit of the lemon juice in the dough, however, which gave it an nice lemony boost.

I also used a mix of 1/2 vanilla sugar (sugar that has been sitting with vanilla pods in it forever) and 1/2 lavender vanilla sugar made by my across-the-street neighbor. The additional flavor notes were mild, but quite nice with the lemon.

I'll definitely report back when I make the freeze overnight method - I can't see why it wouldn't work, even with the baking powder. I've made various icebox cookies over the years - the kind you form into a log, chill or freeze, then slice to bake - and have kept them in the freezer for the unexpected guest. Some of those recipes include baking powder, and there was no problem with the cookies. Now that you've posed the question, though, I wonder...all that cream...not sure what will happen.


It will be a few weeks before I make them again, and I'll report the results then.
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Debbie



Joined: 21 Feb 2005
Posts: 861
Location: Paris

PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2007 4:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Madame! Will whip up a batch.

I actually made a pain d'epice with pumpkin today. Absolutely luscious!!!! We have had a slice each hot (couldn't wait for it to cool down) and cool. Both are delicious although I think the flavours are more developed after letting it cool.

Anyway, off to make some scones to nibble on. Might make a plain batch then a lemonade batch. We can have the plain with the pea and ham soup I made today for our dinner. Yum yum
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If you cannot feel your arteries hardening, eat more cheese. If you can, drink more red wine. Diet is just "die" with a "t" on the end. Exercise is walking into the kitchen.
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2007 7:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh, I love split pea soup! Do you use marjoram in yours? A bit of sherry? I love how they enhance the flavor. And then a little drizzle of cream floated on the top.

A savory scone sounds like the perfect accompaniment!
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2007 10:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Glad to have you back, Madame! (Yes--cream!) I will have raspberry jam with my lemonade scone, please. Unless orange marmalade is available--or would orange jam with lemon scone be too much? (Hmm--tangerine, lime?)
Do Australians say 'SKONE' (rhymes with moan), or 'SKON' (rhymes with gone) ?

Oh how I wish I could follow some of you around the world, some of you around the farmer's markets you write of, and some of you around the kitchen! Debbie, will you be trying to duplicate anything special you had in Croatia, or the ("..expensive") restaurant in Venice?

Rainey, I have never tried marjoram in pea soup, but bay and basil always. I don't like pea or bean soup without some hint of ham/bacon/sausage. A big pot of bean soup--I can live on it for a week, and do, when the SO is out of town. (With bread, beverage, and dessert of course!)

Cooking terms:
"A pinch" ---- this is what you can pick up with your thumb and first 2 fingers.
"Half a pinch" ---- what you can pick up with your thumb and 1st finger.
Is this how you understand these terms?
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madameshawshank



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Penrith (where jacarandas remind me of change), New South Wales, Australia

PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2007 10:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

gingerpale darlin'...skon ma dear..and as for the jams...the kitchen angels will make sure the jam of your sweet heart's desire is there...pronto!
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Carla



Joined: 14 Oct 2006
Posts: 9
Location: Australia

PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2007 11:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just thought that I would clarify that what we refer to as lemonade in Australia is similar to Seven Up in the US, rather than home made lemonade.
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madameshawshank



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Penrith (where jacarandas remind me of change), New South Wales, Australia

PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2007 12:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

that was sweet of you to post...thanks
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