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Indian food
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nima



Joined: 28 Nov 2005
Posts: 93

PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 1:57 pm    Post subject: kebab recipe Reply with quote

I posted this recipe when we were discussing George Foreman grills.

"I really like using my Foreman Grill to make mincemeat kebabs, which I would normally shallow fry in oil. This saves me the extra grease. I combine mincemeat (not too too lean) with finely minced garlic, onions, ginger, tomatoes, cilantro, fresh green chilies, powdered cumin, a bit of amchoor (dried green mango powder), salt, and raw beaten egg and form into thin flat patties. Throw this on the grill, squeeze some lemon on top and serve with salad. It's yummy and pretty simple."
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Donna



Joined: 14 Oct 2005
Posts: 827
Location: Oakland, CA

PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 6:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nima, these kabas sound delicious. Would you serve them on a chapati with raita?

Thank you for all these brilliant references! I will be trying some new things, I think!
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 8:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

nima- I still haven't made it to the Indian grocery store but can you tell me more about the red chili powder?

I'm in Los Angeles in the US for reference. We have an established Mexican influence so the chiles and the chili powder we have here are from that tradition and they're very dark.

I also meant before to say that Manjula says "green chili" when using fresh ones and I interpreted that to be jalapeƱos. But I only saw them sliced so I could be very wrong. OTOH, jalapeƱos with the seeds and ribs removed is what I use in my mulligatawny and they worked equally well in the samosa filling.

Oh! Wouldn't it be wonderful if we could gather together and you and Griffin could give the rest of us tutorials on Indian cooking?! Mabbee David's house? Wink
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Griffin



Joined: 09 Jun 2006
Posts: 932
Location: England

PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 8:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nima,

I found this, tho' how helpful it is, I don't know.

http://www.coorgrecipes.com/sharada_mandanna.asp#

The special black vinegar we only had because it was bought in Coorg and brought back here. I don't know if it's available here.

But I will have a word with my cousin here and ask if she knows what the fruit is that makes the vinegar. And if there's another name for it.

The link also has other Coorg recipes. Kadambuttu are sort of rice balls that are eaten with the pandi kari. Interesting you should say that pandi kari was originally made from wild boar, I always thought the Coorgs reminded me of a certain Gaulish village holding out against the Roman invaders! Wink
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msue



Joined: 18 Dec 2005
Posts: 368

PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 9:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rainey, in one of her videos, she referred to green chili, then added something like, "I use serrano."

Jalapeno would probably work too, if that is what you have on hand, especially if you adjust the heat to your taste.

All this talk about Indian food started a real craving - so guess what we ate for lunch? There is a small Indian place near here, very casual, the kind of place where you order at the counter and they bring you the food when it is ready. I thought it might be a little Americanized, but was happy to see that several Indian families in native dress were among the other diners. It was our first visit, but we'll go back to sample more menu choices.
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nima



Joined: 28 Nov 2005
Posts: 93

PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 11:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Donna, yes absolutely, you can put the kebabs in a chapati or pita pocket, drizzle some raita on top and make a sandwich out of it. I usually serve it on top of some salad greens, with a green chutney on top. For the chutney, just whiz up a cup of yoghurt (plain of course) with a handful of coriander leaves, 1/2 a fresh green chili, a clove of garlic and salt to taste.

Rainey, see if you have cayenne powder in your local grocery store. That is usually made with pure chilies, unlike bottles labeled 'chili powder' which are a mix of dried red chilies and cumin and other spices--chili powder tends to be darker, and is meant for making 'chili con carne.' But really, using this mixed chili powder is fine, if you are in a pinch, or if that is all you can find in your local store--your final dish will be less spicy, that's all. Just don't substitute the other way around, like Erin said, and put in large quantities of cayenne, when a recipe calls for chili powder, since the heat level would be off the charts.

In India you get several varieties of red chilies. Kashmiri chilies are very red in colour, but are surprisingly not as hot as South Indian chilies which are darker and fiery. You can use Mexican chilies, if that is what you can readily find. Just experiment a little to see what kind of spice level they give you. Keep in mind that some Mexican chilies are smoked so they will have a different flavour than ones that are simply dried. If you want the final dish to be red in colour, without adding a lot of red chilies, substitute some paprika for the chili--then the dish will look right, without being too spicy.

If a recipe calls for green chilies that would mean fresh chilies, as opposed to dried ones. You can use jalapenos, which are not as hot as serranos or bird's eye chilis. Whatever you like. Generally, the larger the chili, the milder it will be. I've used jalapenos before, and they work fine.

Griffin, thanks for the website. It looks very interesting. I think kachampulli is made with kokum, which is available as a dried fruit in Indian stores. I use it often to make Kerala fish curries. But kachampulli, the vinegar made with kokum--I don't think that is available outside the region. I'll have to try and get someone to get me some.

And I can just see it now-Asterix and Obelix in Coorg!

And Rainy, I wholeheartedly second the proposal. Let's all reconvene for cooking lessons in David's house. Sounds like the perfect plan!
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msue



Joined: 18 Dec 2005
Posts: 368

PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2008 2:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was just catching up on a podcast of the Amerian Public Radio cooking show, The Splendid Table, and there was a positive review of this guidebook to Indian markets. I thought that maybe some others here might find it of interest:

http://www.amazon.com/Indian-Grocery-Store-Demystified-Guides/dp/1580631436/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1200790219&sr=1-1

If the link doesn't work right, the book is called The Indian Grocery Store Demystified. I haven't seen the book myself (beyond the Amazon description), so this is not a personal recommendation. I'm just passing on the info from the radio program.
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2008 5:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks again, nima. I was just in a conventional grocery store tonight looking at glass jars of spices. I looked at cayenne and said to myself "that looks like the color but she COULDN'T be using cayenne by the quarter cup!".

I'll pull some out of the shelf and use it judiciously. A pinch to a 1/4 teaspoon being my habit. Shocked Very Happy
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2008 7:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I tried the Malai Kofta (fried vegetable/potato/cheese balls napped with a rich sauce.) The little balls kept their shape and stayed intact when fried, hooray. As cute as can be.
The sauce is a little too heavy for me-- cream and whole yogurt and crushed cashews make it so--tomatoes, onions, garlic and garam masala are in there too.
The cheese! A few posts ago (in this thread) DebbieN explained how to make the paneer cheese--well it worked like a charm, and took about 3 seconds! You end up with a mild fresh white cheese a lot like Ricotta. One million uses I'm sure for this stuff.
I've always liked vegetable fritters/patties of all kinds, much fun to learn an authentic Indian variation for this dish.

I've always used cayenne for "red pepper"--and always thought I was cheating and hugely compromising the integrity of the recipe. Now I can relax, it's been OK all along! (Not a fan of that "heat" flavor--I can't help but think that people raised on that have somehow dulled or damaged their tastebuds. Food shouldn't hurt!)
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Mon Jan 21, 2008 12:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

gingerpale wrote:
Not a fan of that "heat" flavor--I can't help but think that people raised on that have somehow dulled or damaged their tastebuds. Food shouldn't hurt!


Oh! I so agree! Especially when there is so much flavor and the flavors are so wonderfully balanced. Why miss any of that with numb tastebuds?

I am going back to see how I missed the info on paneer.

And I must say I'm suitably impressed that you did the malai kofta. The sauce is heaven to me, tho.
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Mon Jan 21, 2008 4:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What a wonderful idea! Whisper, Mouse, Bug, Lily and Priscilla all adore the odours of spices cooking in the kitchen! Very Happy
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DebbieN



Joined: 24 Aug 2007
Posts: 28

PostPosted: Tue Jan 22, 2008 11:17 pm    Post subject: Paneer Reply with quote

gingerpale,
I am so glad the paneer instructions worked! It works for me, but sometimes when I describe using a microwave for real food, either people look at me funny (because "microwaves are for Lean Cuisine") or their microwave has a different wattage or their bowls are the wrong shape or something ... or, as I said before, they just look at me funny.

Incidentally, I discovered that nuking is also good for the Okra Problem (I personally have no problem with it, but my husband whines when I even mention the word okra, his childhood memories of life in southern Illinois didn't help). If you can find whole fresh okra pods (I'm not sure if it would work with frozen ones, haven't tried, but I bet it wouldn't be worse than conventional cooking), wash them and trim the stems a little, put them in a small microwave container with a quarter inch of water at the bottom and a lid, shake the container a couple of times, nuke quickly (2 to 2.5 min for about 2 cups of vegetables) until they're bright green and just tender. Then you can slice them up and toss them quickly in a frying pan with aviyal or "dry-curry"-type spices and onion etc. ingredients, and they won't slime you. My husband disagrees, of course. It took me a week to get him out from under the table last time. But my daughter tasted it.
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Wed Jan 23, 2008 11:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

DebbieN...yes, the liquid and solids separated very cleanly--I can't imagine a pan on the stove could have outdone the microwave for this.

I lived 2 years in Tennesee as a kid, and remember the okra BLOSSOMS especially--a very very sweet smell, big and beautiful too.
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red-dragon



Joined: 10 Feb 2007
Posts: 23
Location: Wales, UK

PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2008 1:48 pm    Post subject: Video jug Reply with quote

A bit late, I know, but here's a really good website with videos and instructions for all sorts of things!!

http://www.videojug.com/tag/indian-recipes
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2008 5:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I grew okra once and, tho I'm not especially interested in eating it, it's an interesting plant with lovely velvety leaves and I agree with giingerpale that the blossoms are lovely. You can also pickle the okra and it's relatively good that way.

I just put it in a jar with any pickle brine I have left over from another pickle I enjoyed.
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