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Buttermilk

 
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Valouth



Joined: 17 Jan 2011
Posts: 15
Location: Málaga

PostPosted: Tue Jan 18, 2011 1:05 pm    Post subject: Buttermilk Reply with quote

Hello !! Very Happy

Various times i found the ingredient "Buttermilk" in my recipes but i don't really know what it is and where can we find it...

I looked in various supermarket but i didn't find any so i tried to make my own. I found this recipe, i don't know if it's a good one: http://frugalliving.about.com/od/condimentsandspices/r/Buttermilk_Sub.htm

Could anyone enlighten me about buttermilk?

Thanks Wink

Valerie
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KYHeirloomer



Joined: 21 Aug 2007
Posts: 552
Location: Central Kentucky

PostPosted: Tue Jan 18, 2011 1:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome to the forums, Valouth.

Originally, buttermilk was just that; the whey that was left after the butterfat had been removed from milk by churning. True buttermilk is thin and tart, almost on the sour side. It was especially popular, as a drink, in the American South.

Modern buttermilk is made differently. Additives are use to sour the milk, and it's often thick; almost clotted cream-like in some cases.

The recipe you linked to should work, particularly for baking. Were it me, I'd start with a low-butterfat milk: 2% say, or even skimmed milk.

Note that if you start that recipe with whole milk, and let it stand any length of time, the curds and whey will separate. Skim the curds and you have the makings of a new cheese, and can still use the whey as a buttermilk substitute. Sort of a culinary double-dip.
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Valouth



Joined: 17 Jan 2011
Posts: 15
Location: Málaga

PostPosted: Tue Jan 18, 2011 10:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

KYHeirloomer wrote:
Welcome to the forums, Valouth.

Originally, buttermilk was just that; the whey that was left after the butterfat had been removed from milk by churning. True buttermilk is thin and tart, almost on the sour side. It was especially popular, as a drink, in the American South.

Modern buttermilk is made differently. Additives are use to sour the milk, and it's often thick; almost clotted cream-like in some cases.

The recipe you linked to should work, particularly for baking. Were it me, I'd start with a low-butterfat milk: 2% say, or even skimmed milk.

Note that if you start that recipe with whole milk, and let it stand any length of time, the curds and whey will separate. Skim the curds and you have the makings of a new cheese, and can still use the whey as a buttermilk substitute. Sort of a culinary double-dip.



That is really interesting! Thank you very much for your answer, it helps me a lot Very Happy
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dory



Joined: 11 Nov 2007
Posts: 236
Location: Madison, WI

PostPosted: Tue Jan 18, 2011 11:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome, Valerie. It seems like just yesterday that I made my first posting here, but I realize it has been at least 2 years now. Time goes fast when you are in good company.

Here in the U.S. buttermilk is widely available, so we can always buy it. I get it for cooking but also drink it. I have developed a liking for the tart taste.

However, buttermilk as it is currently available in the stores is basically a thin yogurt. Sometimes if I don't have buttermilk on hand and I do have kefir or pourable yogurt I use that instead. You can thin it down a little with milk. This works particularly well if you let it stand a bit. Buttermilk is generally used to add acidity to a recipe-- both for taste, and to interact with baking soda to make bread or cakes rise. That is why milk and a bit of vinegar work also.

Dory
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Valouth



Joined: 17 Jan 2011
Posts: 15
Location: Málaga

PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2011 10:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

dory wrote:
Welcome, Valerie. It seems like just yesterday that I made my first posting here, but I realize it has been at least 2 years now. Time goes fast when you are in good company.

Here in the U.S. buttermilk is widely available, so we can always buy it. I get it for cooking but also drink it. I have developed a liking for the tart taste.

However, buttermilk as it is currently available in the stores is basically a thin yogurt. Sometimes if I don't have buttermilk on hand and I do have kefir or pourable yogurt I use that instead. You can thin it down a little with milk. This works particularly well if you let it stand a bit. Buttermilk is generally used to add acidity to a recipe-- both for taste, and to interact with baking soda to make bread or cakes rise. That is why milk and a bit of vinegar work also.

Dory


Really interesting Very Happy Do you use yogurt with or without sugar?
Isn't vinegar too acid for a cake? Surprised
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dory



Joined: 11 Nov 2007
Posts: 236
Location: Madison, WI

PostPosted: Thu Jan 20, 2011 4:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually I have a nice chocolate cake recipe with vinegar and baking soda, but that's another story. You add vinegar to milk to sour it and also to provide the acidity that is missing if you don't have buttermilk. Drinkable yogurt-- such as kefir works because it has the same level of acidity as buttermilk. However, yogurt is less liquid than buttermilk-- even the pourable kind, so you either have to thin it with milk, or adjust the amount of liquid in the recipe (i.e. add a bit more liquid if the dough/batter looks too stiff-- perhaps by adding a bit of water or milk to your mixture until you get the right texture. Yogurt is basically very similar to buttermilk as it is now sold in the stores, but with a thicker texture, and, I assume, a slightly different culture added to sour it. However, I find different kinds of yogurt taste very different anyway, so the type of bacterial culture used to make it is probably not crucial.

Dory

P.S. Good luck with your baking. As you can tell, I am pretty experimental.
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Valouth



Joined: 17 Jan 2011
Posts: 15
Location: Málaga

PostPosted: Thu Jan 20, 2011 11:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

dory wrote:
Actually I have a nice chocolate cake recipe with vinegar and baking soda, but that's another story. You add vinegar to milk to sour it and also to provide the acidity that is missing if you don't have buttermilk. Drinkable yogurt-- such as kefir works because it has the same level of acidity as buttermilk. However, yogurt is less liquid than buttermilk-- even the pourable kind, so you either have to thin it with milk, or adjust the amount of liquid in the recipe (i.e. add a bit more liquid if the dough/batter looks too stiff-- perhaps by adding a bit of water or milk to your mixture until you get the right texture. Yogurt is basically very similar to buttermilk as it is now sold in the stores, but with a thicker texture, and, I assume, a slightly different culture added to sour it. However, I find different kinds of yogurt taste very different anyway, so the type of bacterial culture used to make it is probably not crucial.

Dory

P.S. Good luck with your baking. As you can tell, I am pretty experimental.


Thanks so much for your answer Wink As i never find buttermilk anywhere i will try a yogurt (or a bit a vinegar )

And yes, as we can tell you are pretty experimental hehe Smile

Valerie
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KYHeirloomer



Joined: 21 Aug 2007
Posts: 552
Location: Central Kentucky

PostPosted: Thu Jan 20, 2011 3:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One addition to Dory's comments. Many yogurts, nowadays, have sugar added. So read the label carefully, as that could affect your final results.
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Valouth



Joined: 17 Jan 2011
Posts: 15
Location: Málaga

PostPosted: Thu Jan 20, 2011 4:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay, thanks a lot for your help Very Happy
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