Chocolate & Zucchini Forum Index >> Back to Chocolate & Zucchini <<

 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages 
 RSS feedLast posts feed   RegisterRegister   Log inLog in 

cobbler, crisp, crumble?

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Chocolate & Zucchini Forum Index -> Cooking & Eating
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
swan



Joined: 23 Nov 2004
Posts: 450
Location: a Dutchie in HongKong

PostPosted: Mon Mar 07, 2011 1:00 pm    Post subject: cobbler, crisp, crumble? Reply with quote

I am, ofcourse, not born and raised in the UK or USA. Therefore I have no idea what would be the difference between a cobbler, a crisp and a crumble....aren't they all fruit on the bottom-crumbly dough on top?!
That's what I have in the oven right now (pre-cooked apple-pear in the bottom of an ovendish, a mixture of butter, suger, flour and some oats (to make me believe its more healthy) on top. What am I baking?!
_________________
http://swans-place.blogspot.com
http://jaap-en-mickey.blogspot.com


Last edited by swan on Tue Mar 08, 2011 6:49 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Rachel



Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 296
Location: Santa Barbara, CA

PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 2011 5:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sounds like a crumble to me... but to confuse matters, it could just as easily be a crisp! As an American who has spent quite a lot of time in Britain, it's my impression that the same dessert is called a crumble in the UK and a crisp in the US. A cobbler is a different beast altogether (and is, I think, uniquely American), with the topping made of a biscuit-like batter dropped on top of the fruit in spoonfuls.

Anyway, no matter what your crumble/crisp is called, it sounds delicious. Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 2011 5:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes Mickey, I think Rachel has it. A cobbler definitely has a more dough like topping, I think in sorta like a dumpling mixture.
_________________
Vivant Linguae Mortuae!!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
swan



Joined: 23 Nov 2004
Posts: 450
Location: a Dutchie in HongKong

PostPosted: Sun Mar 13, 2011 2:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ha. I get it, thank you guys!

would a cobbler topping be somewhat like a sponge or poundcake or something similar?(i don't know the consistency of dumpling dough!)Or more..cookiedough?
_________________
http://swans-place.blogspot.com
http://jaap-en-mickey.blogspot.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Rachel



Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 296
Location: Santa Barbara, CA

PostPosted: Sun Mar 13, 2011 11:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cobbler topping is more like scone dough (that was what I meant when I said biscuit-like - I meant biscuit in the American not the British sense. Divided again by a common language Wink ). I've seen recipes that give you a slightly wetter dough as well, closer to batter.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
swan



Joined: 23 Nov 2004
Posts: 450
Location: a Dutchie in HongKong

PostPosted: Mon Mar 14, 2011 2:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

hahaha, we're getting lost in translation here, - but scone-dough I get - at least if you mean the brittish scone?!
ah well - any fruit -and-dough combination is always tasty anyway...!
_________________
http://swans-place.blogspot.com
http://jaap-en-mickey.blogspot.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
dory



Joined: 11 Nov 2007
Posts: 236
Location: Madison, WI

PostPosted: Mon Mar 14, 2011 6:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes. British (and down under) scone, U.S. biscuit. Is there any other term in Canada? I know I once got stuck in a long bars versus squares discussion with my Canadian sister-in-law, only to realize afterwards that I use both terms myself when not talking to Canadians.

Just to make things more confusing, I think the word scone in the U.S. has come to mean any kind of biscuit that is somewhat sweet, so I think many contemporary cooks would tend to use more of a U.S. scone than biscuit dough (although I, personally, like my desserts under-sweetened by most people's standards.) Can you tell I am having a stressful day at work? I tend to check in and make these tiny linguistic distinctions when I need a break from work stress.

Dory
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
KYHeirloomer



Joined: 21 Aug 2007
Posts: 552
Location: Central Kentucky

PostPosted: Mon Mar 21, 2011 3:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

According to the Food Network, here is how the various fruit & biscuit desserts break down:

"All of these quick and simple desserts are made of fruit topped with a biscuit dough or a crumbly mixture of flour, butter, and sugar.

If biscuit dough is dropped by the spoonful on top of the fruit, it makes a lumpy, "cobbled" surface--like a street paved with round stones--and so the dish is a cobbler.

Traditionally, if the biscuit is stirred into the fruit during cooking, it's a pandowdy.

To be a crisp, a crumble, or a crunch, the fruit must be topped with some variation of a butter, sugar, and flour topping. Typically, a crumble has flour, sugar, butter, and oatmeal; a crisp has flour, sugar, butter and nuts; and a crunch has sugar, butter, and breadcrumbs. There are also cake-like (instead of biscuit-like) variations, which include brown betties and buckles.

Some of the funny names, which date back to early American cooking, have a British influence (you know, the people who created bubble and squeak). Slumps and grunts, for example, both have a large biscuit over the fruit. But a slump is cooked uncovered, so it slumps on the serving plate, and a grunt is covered, which steams the biscuit topping and lets the fruit gurgle--or grunt--while cooking."

Hope that helps.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2011 9:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fun information KYHeirloomer! Isn't language a delight?
_________________
Vivant Linguae Mortuae!!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
KYHeirloomer



Joined: 21 Aug 2007
Posts: 552
Location: Central Kentucky

PostPosted: Wed Mar 23, 2011 1:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sure is, David. Except when Brits, Aussies, and Yanks try and communicate.

Talk about being separated by a common language!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Chocolate & Zucchini Forum Index -> Cooking & Eating All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group