Chocolate & Zucchini Forum Index >> Back to Chocolate & Zucchini <<

 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages 
 RSS feedLast posts feed   RegisterRegister   Log inLog in 

Soubise

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Chocolate & Zucchini Forum Index -> Cooking & Eating
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Alisa



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 97
Location: Paris, France

PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2004 12:12 pm    Post subject: Soubise Reply with quote

I recently read a short mention of a French soup/sauce called "Soubise". (I read it in the article in the N.Y. Times, with the C&Z bit) But it was just a mention, and the author said he added crab and a whiff of absinthe, to the traditional onion and rice puree. In searching the internet, and my cookbooks, I found way too many variations, most without any mention of rice. Does anyone know the origin? A good recipe? Is it a soup or a sauce? Classically, what does it accompany? Thank you!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Shelli
Guest





PostPosted: Tue Nov 09, 2004 1:59 am    Post subject: Soubise Reply with quote

Alisa,
I saw that mention of soubise as well, and the man quoted is from New Orleans, so I suspect the original French concept has been Creole-ified. I'll be there in December and may have a chance to find out.

I found this by googling 'soubise recipe'. It seems more like a casserole than a sauce however:
http://www.cebsys.com/fmkit3/002395.htm
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Tue Nov 09, 2004 9:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shelli, thanks for the tip, I found that, and others too! And my two volume set of Mastering the Art of French Cooking, has two different recipes. Usually I can find the origin and much more of, like everything, on the internet. But not this. Hmmmmm Perhaps your trip to New Orleans will reveal some info.
Back to top
Alisa



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 97
Location: Paris, France

PostPosted: Tue Nov 09, 2004 9:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

that last "Guest" reply, was me, Alisa. I forgot to log in before writing. Ooops
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
melinda



Joined: 01 Oct 2004
Posts: 256
Location: Richmond, VA, usa

PostPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2004 11:30 pm    Post subject: new orleans Reply with quote

I'm originally from the "city that care forgot" so I have a couple of fav restaurants/out-of-the-way eating places if anyone wants....bbq shrimp po boys....yum
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Shelli
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Nov 15, 2004 8:54 am    Post subject: New Orleans Reply with quote

Melinda, I'd be grateful for any recommendations you can offer for wonderful eating in Nouvelle Orleans.
Back to top
Shelli
Guest





PostPosted: Thu Nov 18, 2004 5:45 am    Post subject: Soubise in NY Times Reply with quote

Alisa,

The Minimalist column by Mark Bittman in today's NY Times has a recipe for "Rice cooked in Onions" that he says is based on a Julia Child recipe for soubise, which he says is a broader term used for an onion-based sauce. Here's the link. I think you have to register.

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/11/17/dining/17MINI.html?oref=login
Back to top
Alisa



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 97
Location: Paris, France

PostPosted: Thu Nov 18, 2004 2:57 pm    Post subject: Soubise Reply with quote

Shelli, Thank you so much. I am actually registered, but never seem to check in. I felt, deep in my heart, that Julia Child would be the lead, in solving my Soubise mystery.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Alisa



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 97
Location: Paris, France

PostPosted: Thu Nov 18, 2004 3:04 pm    Post subject: Soubise Reply with quote

Shelli, just read, and printed the article and recipe. I am thinking that if I delete the saffron, and add a dash of Absinthe, that should duplicate the idea of the original article. Thank you so, so much for helping me with this!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
estelle
Guest





PostPosted: Thu Nov 18, 2004 4:48 pm    Post subject: gratinée soubise Reply with quote

My mom used to make a "gratinée soubise" in which rice was substituted with sliced potatoes: she lined a dish with slices of (already cooked) potatoes. She covered them with a generous quantity of "béchamelle" sauce mixed with onions (chopped and cooked in butter) then she spread some grated cheese and put the whole thing under the oven grill until golden. It's very simple and revigorating...
Back to top
Julianne



Joined: 21 Dec 2004
Posts: 3
Location: London, England

PostPosted: Tue Dec 21, 2004 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I recently made a sauce soubise to go with a highly traditional English roast chicken. The recipe came from Meilleur du Chef, and it was basically a white sauce with blanched/butter-sweated minced onions that had been pushed through a chinois and finished with a bit of creme fraiche, nutmeg & seasoning. Because I was being English, I didn't bother with the chinois, so my soubise was a bit...er, "rustic."

Onion sauce, as it's called in the UK, is as trad with roast chicken as the very similar bread sauce. The only problem is it makes rather a lot. Now I need to find more soubise recipes to use it up...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Tue Dec 21, 2004 4:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How enlightening! Culturally I guess English was the greatest influence while growing up (emigre grandparents living near by) and Grandma was quite the traditional lady-----but I am unfamiliar with either of your two sauces to accompany chicken Julianne. In particular what is a "bread sauce"?
_________________
Vivant Linguae Mortuae!!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Julianne



Joined: 21 Dec 2004
Posts: 3
Location: London, England

PostPosted: Wed Dec 22, 2004 7:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi David. Bread sauce is quite old fashioned in Canada (I'm Canadian, but I've been living in London for nearly 10 years), but still fairly popular in the UK. It's a milk/cream based sauce thickened with fresh breadcrumbs. You infuse full fat milk with a clove-studded onion and bay leaf, then add the breadcrumbs and a bit of nutmeg plus seasoning. It makes for a very mild, very thick sauce.

The onion sauce is very similar, but I prefer the texture from the white sauce (bits of onion and all) and I think the flavour is better developed. It's a good contrast to the usual jus, too. Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Wed Dec 22, 2004 10:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Julianne. Your description did stir a very vague olfactory memory! Perhaps it was part of my early childhood but has been lost to me.
_________________
Vivant Linguae Mortuae!!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Chocolate & Zucchini Forum Index -> Cooking & Eating All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group