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Comfort Foods
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Judy



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 1196
Location: buried under a pile of books somewhere in Adelaide, South Australia

PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2004 6:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

madameshawshank, we still love you!

My partner Greg has an even bigger vice - condensed milk, specially in porridge and on bread and butter. When we went to Thailand earlier this year, we had to take cartons of condensed milk with us, just in case we couldn't find any over there!
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swan



Joined: 23 Nov 2004
Posts: 450
Location: a Dutchie in HongKong

PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2004 8:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ah, brighidsdaughter, hot strong tea, ofcourse!
Or the occasionally perfect cup of cofee.(why, oh why, are Starbucks and its brothers and sisters not yet in Holland?!) In dutch we even call coffee "een bakkie troost", which means as much as 'a cup of comfort/consolation'.
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melinda



Joined: 01 Oct 2004
Posts: 256
Location: Richmond, VA, usa

PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2004 2:11 pm    Post subject: sugar coated comfort Reply with quote

to madame shawshank: i grew up eating bread, butter & sugar & also bread & mayonaise (which we pronounced "my" o naise) and wondered if we in the south were alone in our healthy habits...i must say our dentists were probably grateful!
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Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2004 2:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mac and cheese! I use a recipe with white cheddar, gruyere and pecorino all mixed up with nutmeg, cayenne, cream and topped off with bread crumbs. I think it was sent from angels.

I also love toasted olive bread topped with caramelized onions and garlic along side a bowl of fennel soup with a dollop of marscapone. Apples and cheese, tomatoes baked with balsamic and chevre, and of course grilled cheese. My favorite though would have to be Jambon Mornay from my favorite patisserie, Le Panier in Seattle. Going in there early on a cold, nasty Saturday morning with my husband, reading The Times drinking cafe au lait was the best part of the weekend. I miss Seattle.

Great topic David!
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2004 5:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So many are saying soup and I have to agree! In any of it's forms and flavors, soup feels just as good on the outside when you wrap your palms and fingers around a warm, heavy stoneware mug as it does on the inside!

I came to Indian food in my mid-20s and only more recently discovered mulligatawny soup. Last year I got a great and easy recipe from the FoodNetwork and now it's something that really lifts my spirits and makes me feel ready for anything.

In writing this, I also remember a number of years ago when LA was hit with quite a severe earthquake. Our house was twisted (but still standing, thank god) and we were rattled. We had no electricity so we didn't find out for most of that day the extent of things. But our stove was gas so the first thing I did after we counted noses and found ourselves all intact, was put on a pot of fresh veggie soup.

I hadn't thought in years of how that really did comfort us and put us on track to clean up and start the repairs. That's a nice, reassuring memory. Thanks for provoking it! Wink
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2004 8:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

madameshawshank!!

Thank you for bringing back some wonderful memories! As a child we often visited my grandparents on the farm homesteaded by my great-grandfather (Norwegian) and I so clearly recall my grandfather finishing off his dinner by using his fork as an extention to reach to the other end of the trestle table to snare a piece of my grandmother's fresh white bread, plopping it on his plate, pouring freshly separated cream over it and then a few spoons of sugar. Of course we all tried it and we all loved it although I liked my aunt's variation using corn syrup instead of sugar. A fine memory, again thank you.

And Erin, thank you, it is a fun topic!
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2004 8:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You know Erin, I just might be able to sell that mac and cheese recipe to my partner! sounds wonderful.
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monkey



Joined: 08 Oct 2004
Posts: 87
Location: in the kitchen with a large bar of chocolate

PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2004 9:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

erin! my angel! recipe please! i have fond memories of such a mac and cheese and can not find the recipe in my file. when ever i mention it to someone they say "nutmeg and cayenne" with crinkled up noses. but i remember it as sublime!
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2004 10:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

swan wrote:
ah, Monkey, 'draadjesvlees'....it's a kind of meatstew, the kind grandma makes and just the smell of it makes you happy. Since I never had a grandma I am pretty proud I tought myself how to make it.


I am just about to start braising my very first 'draadjesvlees' (phonetic help, please!). I thought I'd do it because your description sounded so yummy. But, it's brilliant because it will braise away all afternoon while I work on TDay side dishes!

If I find I've got a bit of time when dinner rolls around, I might make some spatzle to go with it.

Thanks ever so for that contribution! :smooches: (I don't see that emoticon)
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Judy



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 1196
Location: buried under a pile of books somewhere in Adelaide, South Australia

PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2004 11:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Spatzle? Rainey, what is it, and can you please share a recipe or description on how to make it?
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Thu Nov 25, 2004 1:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You may not recognize it because I'm mangling the spelling so badly. Embarassed It's a noodle/dumpling thing -- maybe Dutch, maybe German or Eastern European. They're made by dropping a wet dough into boiling water.

Here's a link to a recipe from the Food Network: http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,,FOOD_9936_2587,00.html

They're lovely tossed with just a little bit of butter and/or served with something that has a bit of gravy.
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swan



Joined: 23 Nov 2004
Posts: 450
Location: a Dutchie in HongKong

PostPosted: Thu Nov 25, 2004 9:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
'draadjesvlees' (phonetic help, please!)....

I might make some spatzle to go with it.


dear rainey, very good combination with spatzle! I know spatzle from winterholidays in Switserland and Austria, it's not dutch, I think German/mid-european/Balkan and I buy a stock for my freezer whenever I get a chance!

how to pronounce 'draadjesvlees'...uhm....[draat-jes-flees] : the double 'aa' in 'draadjes' like tomatoes in English-english instead of american english (I say tomato, you say tomáto), and the double ee in vlees sounds more like the letter 'a'in english, pronounced like the 'a' in behAve

did that help?! Smile

Enjoy dinner, wish I could come over!!
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swan



Joined: 23 Nov 2004
Posts: 450
Location: a Dutchie in HongKong

PostPosted: Fri Nov 26, 2004 7:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

so, Rainey, how did it turn out?
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Fri Nov 26, 2004 8:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, of course I have nothing to compare it to, so I can't say how closely it resembled anything authentic. But, that said, I'd say it was a delicious, homey meal. A sort of pot roasty thing and *definite* comfort food.

I used shoulder chuck steaks that were cross-cut about 1/2" thick so it wasn't stringy at all. But it was falling apart tender and just yummy. I used some balsamic vinegar for the acid -- next time I'll use a little more. Or is there a Dutch vinegar that I might look for for a more authentic flavor? I didn't have time to make the spatzle so we just had conventional noodles with it. And I cooked the beef with lots of sliced onion and threw in large chunks of carrots in the last 1/2 to 3/4 of an hour. The dark meat, bright carrots and white noodles were pretty on the platter.

It was the perfect thing to have braising away while I did the advance prep for TDay. And it was a wonderful new culinary tradition to discover a bit of. I've been working my way through a Greek cookbook lately. Now I'll look forward to finding a Dutch one and learn more about that too. Thanks so much for sharing your memory and your tips! Wink

Some of my family (who hadn't been home for the draadjesvlees) inadvertently used the leftover draadjesvlees gravy on their leftover turkey dressing. They pronounced it "delicious" too. Wink
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Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Sun Nov 28, 2004 10:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I will post the Mac and cheese recipe tomorrow!
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