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Sauerbraten

 
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2005 11:50 pm    Post subject: Sauerbraten Reply with quote

I just finished the leftovers of this terrific sauerbraten: http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,,FOOD_9936_31740,00.html I don't know anything about authentic sauerbraten — I've only ever had my own — but I can vouch for it's excellent flavor!

I got my round at Costco which sells them in packages of two. So I marinated both of them in a vacuum sealed bag with the brine for just one. I resealed the package and froze the second one when I opened the package to cook the first one.

Half the brine made enough yummy gravy for both of them. I stirred a couple generous spoonfuls of sour cream.

If anyone's interested in a recipe for red cabbage to accompany it, the Gourmet anniversary cookbook had a fine one. I'll type it out if anyone wants it.
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Monica



Joined: 13 Oct 2005
Posts: 90
Location: Chicago

PostPosted: Fri Dec 09, 2005 4:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow, I didn't realize it sits in the marinade for that long. I've had this in restaurants and enjoyed it. I feel silly asking, but I've never actually cooked with juniper berries, and I just can't recall seeing them around... How are they sold/packaged and in what part of the store should I look for them? Thanks!
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madameshawshank



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Penrith (where jacarandas remind me of change), New South Wales, Australia

PostPosted: Sun Dec 11, 2005 6:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rainey...I love love love it! so tender is that meat..seems funny to be reading of such food while the summer sun pours down on us...however I can taste it via my imagination...that long long time marinading is part of the fun of the preparation..

as for the red cabbage recipe..yes please!
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Sun Dec 11, 2005 7:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Monica- Yes. Sauerbraten can be quite an undertaking. That's why I thought the vacuum sealed packet was such a helpful approach. Otherwise, you're searching for the right size and shape container that keeps the meat covered in the brine and then keeping it weighted down inside. And having a second one ready to roast will make the next one a snap!

Juniper berries can be tough to locate. I had some on hand from the last time I snatched them up when I saw them. I'm guessing there would be some ambitious market in Chicago that would have them. Do you have a Whole Foods? If not, I'd try Penzey's or some other online source. Or, e-mail me your snail addie and I can slip you a few berries. I have enough to last me for the next 5 years or so.

Madameshawshank- Here you go, toots! Wink

Braised Red Cabbage from The Gourmet Cookbook
serves 8

• 1 medium sized head of red cabbage (3 1/2 lb.), quartered, cored and thinly sliced
• 1/4 pound bacon (4 slices), chopped
• 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
• 2 large sweet onions, thinly sliced
• 1/2 cup white wine vinegar
• 3 tablespoons packed brown sugar
• 1 tablespoon salt
• 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Rinse the cabbage under cold water, then drain; do not pat dry.

Cook bacon in a 6- to 8-quart heavy pot over moderately low heat, stirring, until crisp, about 3 minutes. With a slotted spoon, transfer bacon to paper towels to drain. Add butter to bacon fat, increase heat to moderate, and add onions (I also added a tart apple that I had peeled, cut into eighths, cored and then sliced thin). Cook, stirring until golden brown, 12 to 15 minutes. Stir in cabbage, vinegar, brown sugar, salt, and pepper, cover, and simmer, stirring occasionally, until cabbage is tender, about 1 1/4 hours.

Sprinkle cabbage with bacon just before serving.

Gourmet's Note: The cabbage can be cooked up to 1 day ahead. Cool, uncovered, then refrigerate, covered. Refrigerate bacon separately, covered. Bring bacon to room temperature before using and reheat cabbage over moderate heat, stirring occasionally.

I thought it had great flavor and the color stayed quite nice too.
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Guest






PostPosted: Sun Dec 11, 2005 1:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello Rainey,

I love Sauerbraten, though I never prepared it, because it's a dish you get very easily in traditional restaurants where I live. It's usually served with "Apfelrotkohl", some red cabbage cooked with apples or in apple juice, which can be bought ready-made in vacuum bags here. Since your recipe calls for vinegar and sugar, I suspect that the result you had was quite similar. A regional version of Sauerbraten, in Solingen, the town famous for its knife manufacture, is made with horse meat, because the meat itself is sweeter... I haven't tried it.

V.
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Sun Dec 11, 2005 6:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I ate horsemeat in France and found it interesting and perfectly acceptable as a substitution for beef. I never saw anything served, however, other than thin cutlets. I would guess the sauerbraten method of brining would make venison a lot less gamey and tough as well.

I suspect the red cabbage is similar to what's readily available where you are. They certainly sound like the same concept.

When I was young back in the Mid-Hudson area of NYS where there were German enclaves, you could purchase cooked red cabbage in jars in the markets. But I think the recipe I just used is infinitely better. It's less sweet and has both more complexity of flavor and better "tooth". That jarred stuff used to be so soft that there was little reason to chew. Shocked There are great packaged sauerkrauts, though, so I'm sure there's no reason red cabbage couldn't be equally interesting. I just don't think it's popular enough anymore or here in LA so no one's bothered.

Speaking of great sauerkraut, I just love how sauerkraut, cooked slowly, develops a lovely sweet flavor. Makes me wonder why it was necessary to add sugar to the red cabbage. Worked, tho.
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Fritz
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 2006 3:43 am    Post subject: sauerbraten Reply with quote

The longer the beef stays in the marinade the darker it gets. I think ten days is good. I like it when it matches the pumpernickel bread in darkness.
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dr_dad



Joined: 02 Jan 2006
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 2006 11:03 pm    Post subject: Braised Red Cabbage from The Gourmet Cookbook .. Reply Reply with quote

hi

ref.. "Braised Red Cabbage from The Gourmet Cookbook "

iv'e been reading / using Gourmet Cookbook for the last couple of weeks .

have discovered that you can go to Gourmet web site ( http://www.epicurious.com/gourmet/ ).. using the advanced search , input the recipe title and you can get the text for a recipe for the last 15 years or so.. plus you can see reviews / suggestions from other cooks who have tried the recipe.

dr_dad
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