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Anzac Day

 
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2006 3:08 pm    Post subject: Anzac Day Reply with quote

Just a quick tip of the hat to all our Australian and New Zealander members as they remember their dead-----and needless to say------party!

Have a great Anzac Day and tell us how you celebrated it.
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dadegroot



Joined: 25 Feb 2006
Posts: 81
Location: Cedar Creek, Qld, Australia

PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2006 11:44 am    Post subject: Re: Anzac Day Reply with quote

David wrote:
Just a quick tip of the hat to all our Australian and New Zealander members as they remember their dead-----and needless to say------party!

Have a great Anzac Day and tell us how you celebrated it.


Well I spared a thought for our past fallen, and my Grandfathers who both served in one way or another.

We were on holiday at Kirra Beach (SE Qld), and played on the beach with the kidlets, had very good fish and chips for lunch and went to the Rusty Pelican at Coolangatta for dinner.

--
Dave
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Barbara



Joined: 13 Nov 2004
Posts: 899
Location: Gold Coast Australia

PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2006 9:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It was a quiet one for us this year. I didn't even make Anzac biscuits. My son had intended to go to the Dawn Parade but it was raining so heavily he decided to stay in bed when the time came. Anzac day is also the anniversary day of my fathers death so the day has extra signifigcance for our family.
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Debbie



Joined: 21 Feb 2005
Posts: 861
Location: Paris

PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2006 10:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We went to the Dawn Service at the Embassy and then stayed for the gunfire breakfast. This weekend we will be at the battlefields for the ceremonies there.

ANZAC Day is quite low key here, and very different for me. Normally I attend a Dawn Service and then march in Sydney and then catch up with friends afterwards in a bar somewhere in the CBD. There are fellow servicemen and women that I only seem to see on ANZAC Day and it is always a day filled with stories of when we did "this, that or the other" and "remember when" type memories. Also many , many , many drinks. Lucky the trains are free for those who are ex or current service personnel on this day or none of us would be able to find our way home that night. Seem to always arrive home with empty pockets after buying drinks for mates (and being bought them in return - the good old Aussie "shout") all day and playing two up.

Thank you for your post David. It is an important day for everyone to remember and is very grounding. Makes the young ones growing up appreciate the sacrifices that were made for them to live in Australia and New Zealand as they are today.

Barbara, it is also a bitter sweet day for me. My father died on ANZAC Day many years ago, and I always think of him and have a tear in my eye when I march. My brother has just been accepted into the Australian Army, and I am hoping in years to come he will march and carry our grandfathers medals (he is the last male left in the family and I think it is important for him to have the medals and pass them down to his son). He starts on Monday next, so this time of year will be even more significant from now on for us.
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madameshawshank



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Penrith (where jacarandas remind me of change), New South Wales, Australia

PostPosted: Fri Apr 28, 2006 4:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

thanks David.....the day is my mother in law's birthday...she, her husband, and 7 children came to Australia from Germany in 1954. so we celebrate her birthday...sometimes I bake Anzac biscuits..

the march in Darwin had to be cancelled because of the cyclone...

our son is in NZ at the moment, and he went to his first dawn service...

any readers, except the Oz 'n NZers and those who've been in Oz or NZ on Anzac Day know what two up is? Wink ..nothing quite like being at the annual two up session..I've been once..

this year the letters page of the Herald has had quite a few letters on the topic of the results of war....the suicides of the men who returned..one wrote of a man in 1938 walked into the ocean at Coogee...we dined with an historian last night who spoke movingly of those men...who came back broken either in body or mind or both....and were expected to slip back into life in Oz...as though they'd never been to hell...Michael said there were many many many suicides..

I pray for Iraq...all in Iraq...what is that doing to minds and bodies?

war no more

perhaps merely a dream
however let me dream this
there be war no more...

lest we forget...

again David, merci
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Leo



Joined: 25 Nov 2005
Posts: 94
Location: New Zealand

PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2006 7:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

For those not from Oz/NZ, Remembrance Day/ Armistice day isn't observed on November 11 as it is in Canada and Britain (Remembrance Sunday).
Instead, and more appropriately, Anzac Day, April 25th, commemorates the heavy losses during the long and arduous battle fought by the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (Anzac) on the shores of Gallipoli. It has now come to include WWII and other conflicts.
I went to the Dawn service here in NZ. I think it poured down on Dawn parades throughout the entire country, and kept raining as I made my way to the local RSA where I had breakfast with 4 army blokes.. all over 80 years of age Smile
We sat beside walls covered in regimental plaques and names and memorial photos while they had a few glasses of rum (I am sure there would have been no arm twisting to get a bit of 2up going!) and passed a few hours telling stories about being stationed overseas, about training here in NZ, (arguing) how they knew each other and where they had first met.. most of them had spent time in Italy and one even remembered some Italian (he thinks Jamie's Italy is a bloody good show!).
Poppys are worn in NZ, I didn't see any rosemary as I did in Australia a few years ago. Rosemary grew wild over the Gallipoli peninsula.
It was an interesting day and, as luck would have it, I was fortunate to spend it with some wonderful gentlemen who remember better than anyone why we keep our days of Remembrance and are so glad we do. They will stay in my mind always.

To all whose Anzac Day holds extra significance.. my thoughts and prayers go out to you too.

Lest we Forget.
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madameshawshank



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Penrith (where jacarandas remind me of change), New South Wales, Australia

PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2006 9:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Leo, those 4 elderly men will remember you too! thank you for your post..
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
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Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2006 4:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great post Leo. Wonderfully expressed sentiments. Thank you.
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Leo



Joined: 25 Nov 2005
Posts: 94
Location: New Zealand

PostPosted: Mon May 01, 2006 6:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Madame, I hope so.. it is debatable as to who had a better day albeit in different ways. All I did was listen.
A good topic, thank you David.
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Debbie



Joined: 21 Feb 2005
Posts: 861
Location: Paris

PostPosted: Mon May 01, 2006 8:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think you will find that ANZAC Day also celebrates the battles at the Somme and that is why poppies and rosemary are used. It is not an exclusive commemoration of Gallipoli (sorry Leo). This is a common misconception.

The poppies are because the fields of Flanders were covered in them. Rosemary is the traditional herb for rememberance (remember your Shakespear?).

11 November is celebrated in Australia. It is Remembrance Day. It is just not a public holiday. There are always services at 11am on 11th day of 11th month. No reason for England etc to celebrate ANZAC Day as it is the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps commemoration, not a British etc thing.

We went to the services at the Somme and it was one of the most amazing experiences. The villages around there have street names which relate to Australia and NZ and they all have war memorials to them as well as French soldiers.

You could not have had a more heartwarming welcome anywhere in the world than what we received. Spent the day going around to 6 different services in different villages and spending a short time with the locals after each. The last village held a wine reception afterwards in the village hall. There were ex soldiers from a 20 kilometre radius at this village and the atmosphere was indescribable. My husband and I wound up being seperated by the crush and he found me with a group of french exsoldiers hearing about their experiences and trading army stories. The average age would have been 70's and upwards and they remembered the war as children and then later conflicts as adults. I heard all about the different medals awarded to each of them and was privileged to be able to hold and inspect some of them.

We have been invited back to spend time with these people and visit the area. It is something we will definately do.

What an amazing experience. I was very proud to be born Australian, and very privileged to be living in France and able to experience this first hand. A very long and heartwrenching day, I came home red eyed and drained, but very pleased I went.
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Leo



Joined: 25 Nov 2005
Posts: 94
Location: New Zealand

PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2006 12:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice to hear about your Anzac day. I am glad you have shared your opportunity to mark it with a warm reception on foreign soil. Regardless of country, I feel more than ever that there is, even when we are commemorating these terrible events of the past, a thread that binds us all together in friendship. It is fitting that we remember, as those who served, alongside each other.

Your experience also reminds me that sooner than later I should go to the Netherlands for their celebration and see the area where my great-uncle was stayed for several months before being sent back to Canada. He never had the chance to go back, but then, as he said, many never had the chance to go home.

I don't remember a public holiday being observed in Aussie on Remembrance Day when I lived in Darwin a few years ago. There were significant services and silence held but not to the extent of Anzac day.

Poppys are widely used in Canada and 'In Flander's Fields' is always recited. It gives me goosebumps. And to think of how easily it could not have been recorded.

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly,
Scarce heard amid the guns below.
We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved, and were loved, and now we lie,

In Flanders fields.
Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

Written by physician John McCrae on May 3, 1915 after the battle at Ypres.

Thanks Deb, for sharing.
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Judy



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 1196
Location: buried under a pile of books somewhere in Adelaide, South Australia

PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2006 5:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's right, Leo, we don't observe Remembrance Day with a public holiday, as we do with Anzac Day.

I can't recall when it changed, but for many years Anzac Day was observed on the Monday closest to the actual date, which basically made it just another long weekend. Thankfully we now observe it on the actual day which I think gives it a lot more meaning than 'just another long weekend'.

I worked (night shift) this year and couldn't go to the Dawn Service. When we went last year I have a vivid memory of the beautiful birdsong of currawongs while the silence was observed.

Next year I'd like to go to a local Dawn Service, which are becoming bigger each year, at least here in Adelaide. We have little local memorials dotted all over our inner suburbs and it would be great to just walk to our local one.
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madameshawshank



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Penrith (where jacarandas remind me of change), New South Wales, Australia

PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2006 8:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

whenever I see the word "Flanders" I'm drawn once again to Jacques Brel...I remember years years back seeing the film"Jacques Brel is Alive and Well and Living in Paris"...My husband and I were blown away by it...the magic of the lyrics..the crystal clearness of the voices...

and this song that still, after all these years, brings on the tears...

Marieke

Ay, Marieke, Marieke
The Flanders sun burns the sky
Since you are gone
Ay, Marieke, Marieke
In Flanders field the poppies die
Since you are gone
Zonder liefde, warme liefde
Waait de wind de stomme wind
Zonder leifde, warme liefde
Weent de zee de grijze zee
Zonder liefde, warme leifde
Lijdt het licht het donk're licht
En schuurt het zand o ver mijn land
Mijn platte land mijn Vlanderland
Ay, Marieke, Marieke
The stars look down, so soon, so soon
The day is done
Ay, Marieke, Marieke
The Flanders moon won't light your way
The day is done
Zonder liefde, warme liefde
Waait de wind c'est fini
Zonder liefde, warme liefde
Weent de zee déjà fini
Zonder liefde, warme liefde
Lidjt het licht tout est fini
En schuurt het zand over mijn land
Mijn platte land mijn Vlanderland
Ay, Marieke, Marieke
The bells have rung, the echoes sound
The day is gone
Ay, Marieke, Marieke
In Flanders field the echoes sound
The day is gone
Zonder liefde, warme liefde
Lacht duivel de zwarte duivel
Zonder liefde, warme liefde
Brandt mijn hart mijn oude hart
Zonder lifde, warme liefde
Sterft de zomer de droeve zomer
En schuurt het zand over mijn land
Mijn platte land mijn Vlanderland
Ay, Marieke, Marieke
Come back again, come back again
The day is gone
Ay, Marieke, Marieke
Your love alone, your love alone
The day is gone
Ay, Marieke, Marieke
Come back again, come back again
The day is gone
Ay, Marieke, Marieke
Your love alone, your love alone
The day is gone, the day is gone, the day is gone
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