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french substitutes
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cigalechanta



Joined: 27 Dec 2004
Posts: 200
Location: cambridge, ma.

PostPosted: Tue Jan 04, 2005 8:26 pm    Post subject: french substitutes Reply with quote

for Brown sugar and cream of tartar?
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ptegan



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 7
Location: Paris 20th

PostPosted: Wed Jan 05, 2005 11:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What are you using the brown sugar for exactly?
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cigalechanta



Joined: 27 Dec 2004
Posts: 200
Location: cambridge, ma.

PostPosted: Wed Jan 05, 2005 5:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's not for me. Someone who recently moved to France asked me if I knew. Also a substitute for allspice.
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Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Wed Jan 05, 2005 6:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is she/he wanting a translation?
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cigalechanta



Joined: 27 Dec 2004
Posts: 200
Location: cambridge, ma.

PostPosted: Wed Jan 05, 2005 6:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No substitutes, Erin.
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Wed Jan 05, 2005 6:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry if I'm being stupid here. We've switched providers, we're experiencing havoc from the heavy rains, I've been out of the loop and I'm having too much trouble just going forward to go back.

Someone has a French friend who cannot get allspice? There isn't a French equivalent for the berries? It seems to me they'd be very simple to mail and would keep almost indefinitely before they were ground up. Meanwhile, a quick twirl in a coffee grinder would render them useable in a couple seconds.
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Alisa



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 97
Location: Paris, France

PostPosted: Wed Jan 05, 2005 7:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As an american, living in Paris, I have found substitutes or places to buy "everything"!

Light and dark brown sugar can be purchased at Naturalia, and other health food type stores. Allspice and cream of tartar can be purchased at Le Grande Epicerie de Paris, at Le Bon Marche, and at The Real Mc Coy in the 15th, and at Thanksgiving store. Thanksgiving Store has a web site.

good luck!
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cigalechanta



Joined: 27 Dec 2004
Posts: 200
Location: cambridge, ma.

PostPosted: Wed Jan 05, 2005 7:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

She's not in Paris, alas, but the Auvergne.
But thanks for your responses, all.
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Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Wed Jan 05, 2005 9:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well I know that brown sugar is basicly mix of sugar and molasses.
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swan



Joined: 23 Nov 2004
Posts: 450
Location: a Dutchie in HongKong

PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 2005 10:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

but what on earth is cream of tartar?What does it do? I don't know it, but maybe it has a very different name in dutch.
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ptegan



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 7
Location: Paris 20th

PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 2005 3:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't know about Auvergne but in Paris you can get brown sugar pretty much everywhere and many different types too, depending on if it's for cakes, cooking or cocktails Smile
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 2005 7:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

swan wrote:
but what on earth is cream of tartar?What does it do? I don't know it, but maybe it has a very different name in dutch.


This link has some info http://www.encyclopedia.com/html/c1/creamtar.asp This one has a photo http://www.culinarycafe.com/Spices_Herbs/Cream_Tartar.html

I wonder, since it's an important ingredient in the leavener baking powder, what is the European equivalent. Leavening is important (accomplished one way or another) the world around. And there is certainly a wine producing tradition that must yield this acid by some name. Question Question
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Alisa



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 97
Location: Paris, France

PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 2005 7:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I arrived, to live, in France, I asked my French husband who is a great cook, what do you call cream of tartar in French? Since he had lived in the U.S. for eight years, I figured that he would know. Response: "I have no idea, and I have been wondering for years what that stuff is, in the kitchen." After searching Harrap's French/English dictionary, the web, and the brains of many french cooks, I am still under the impression that the french chef doesn't use the stuff. What is so wierd is that it's origin is from wine casks in France. My only suggestions are to a) have friends and relatives send some, b) find web sites that will send it to you, i.e. Thanksgiving Store in Paris.[/b]
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Alisa



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 97
Location: Paris, France

PostPosted: Fri Jan 07, 2005 1:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can't seem to let this one go! After typing "what is cream of tartar called in French", in Google, I was able to locate the chemical name.

syn: cream of tartar, potassium hydrogen tartrate

Since you can only purchase Baking Soda, (the Arm & Hammer type) at pharmacies in France, perhaps you can purchase, potassium hydrogen tartrate, at pharmacies as well.
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Fri Jan 07, 2005 8:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alisa wrote:
I can't seem to let this one go! After typing "what is cream of tartar called in French", in Google, I was able to locate the chemical name.

syn: cream of tartar, potassium hydrogen tartrate

Since you can only purchase Baking Soda, (the Arm & Hammer type) at pharmacies in France, perhaps you can purchase, potassium hydrogen tartrate, at pharmacies as well.


It is intriguing, isn't it? I take it they don't have "baking powder" or if they do it's only as the commercial combination of baking soda + cream of tartar? You could still whip egg whites without cream of tartar even if they'd be a little more fragile. Still, I wonder how they do muffins without baking powder or if there's any such thing as muffins in European cuisine.

What else would effectively be eliminated? Biscuits, cake-style doughnuts, quick breads, pound cakes, many cookies come to mind. What else? Dear god, baking powder (with cream of tartar) is such a basic ingredient in my pantry and my baking!
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