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favourite (or favorite :-)) quirky word
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Pesto Man



Joined: 17 Jun 2005
Posts: 185
Location: New Orleans Louisiana

PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2006 1:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well I certainly like incorrigible..It is another one of those words that commonly exist in the negative only, (see previous post) but in this case it makes no difference whatsoever as I cannot think of a single instance of when I was ever "Corrigable" Laughing

Words are so much fun!!!! a couple of my favorites

defenestration (being thrown out of a window)

and the great-grand-daddy of all "quirky" words (it is certainly the one I cut my teeth on...ANTIDISESTABLISHMENTARIANISM which unlitke SUPERCALLA...whatever, was an actual term refering to that school of thought which was opposed to the "disestablishment" of the Church Of England.
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Pamela Therese



Joined: 14 Sep 2006
Posts: 6
Location: Emu Plains (Jacarandas at the foot of the Blue Mountains) New South Wales, Australia

PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2006 2:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Griffin ..... apparently I'm the only one in the ENTIRE world who was BORN incorrigible ... according to my Latin teacher.

But if you do manage to start showing incorrigibilistic traits I will sic said teacher onto you ....... that should change your mind. Twisted Evil although it didn't apparently fix me .... "cause I was born that way

Sarape ..... have heard "Loggerheads" all my life almost weekly ......... it is friendly conflict for some Wink
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georgia



Joined: 16 May 2006
Posts: 456
Location: california

PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2006 3:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

GOBSMACKED!

What a swell word. "Swell" is good, too.

I love all new words I hear my grandchildren say, and I mean that in the most unsentimental way. The acquisition of language is an absolute wonder.
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Griffin



Joined: 09 Jun 2006
Posts: 932
Location: England

PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2006 1:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

loggerheads - Well there actually is a place in England called Loggerheads... tho' I was never at it!

balderdash - this is what the Norse god Balder used to do when they set the dog on him!

nugatory - Tories in Britain are Conservatives, I would never 'ug a Tory.

quisling - a little quiz?

sedulous - a report. What the winner said... u lous!

pugnacious - a voracious pug?

Pesto Man,
I dont' think I've ever been corrigible either. Tho' I once felt a lot like a dirigible, but that was after a particularly big meal! I know about defenestration.

The first museum I worked at, Bruce Castle Museum in Tottenham, London had a collection of paintings by a woman called Beatrice Offor (1864-1920) who, under mighty stress, threw herself out of a window and died of her injuries. It was spooky because the Museum itself had been owned by Henry Hare, Lord Coleraine. He took agin his first wife, Lady Constantia Lucy of Broxbourne and locked her in the clocktower - actually in the room below the clock mechanism. She went, understandably, mad and threw herself and her baby through the window and died. That was in the 18th century. Henry Hare was having an affair with the Duchess of Somerset, the cad!

Pamela T,
Clearly you and I are like Jessica Rabbit - we aren't bad, we were just drawn that way! I will apply my gladius to the teachers gluteus maximus if he/she threatens me... either that or I'll run and hide!!

Georgia,
The first time I ever heard gobsmacked was by Terry Wogan the BBC Radio 2 broadcaster. I wasn't sure he'd made it up or as he's Irish, if it was an Irish word. Either way, it's so expressive.
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madameshawshank



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Penrith (where jacarandas remind me of change), New South Wales, Australia

PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2006 1:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

oh Griffin..Terry Wink Wogan! Our family knows him via The Eurovision Song Contest ~ the funniest stuff. That contest seems to have a strange life of its own.

Am thinking of the wonder that words are being created now..this minute...amazing!
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Sarape



Joined: 15 Dec 2004
Posts: 583
Location: Anniston Alabama USA

PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2006 9:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Griffin wins my sedulous award of the week.

Have you heard about the new biography on Robert Oppenheimer?; "The American Prometheus".

You seem like the type who'd appreciate a guy like Oppie.
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Griffin



Joined: 09 Jun 2006
Posts: 932
Location: England

PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2006 6:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ooh I win! Er, or I lous?!! Confused

Sarape,

I've heard of Oppenheimer, he was one of the architects of the atom bomb who quoted Krishna in the Mahabharata having seen the explosion of the bomb. I am become the destroyer of worlds... etc.

I shall track that biog down and read it!

Madame,

I am looking forward to late November... even if I will be a year older, sigh! I will of course be telling everyone that I am only 28... ahem. Unless my occasional grey hairs betray me... in which case I will say I am actually 25! Wink
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madameshawshank



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Penrith (where jacarandas remind me of change), New South Wales, Australia

PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2006 9:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

am wondering what word covers "to worry about one's age" Wink

Griffin...London indeed...before then, The Babes (as I've decided to name both Sieg 'n I ~ he, because he's (along with me!) going to the area in Germany where he was born 1949, and me?..ah well, why not! )..have much discovering and "oh my goshing!" to do

Surtsey and why named so..a bit of googling tells me Surtur was the fire giant in Norse mythology..

The wonder of names...of our own...why velvet became velvet and hessian became hessian (or why hessian is burlap Wink )
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Griffin



Joined: 09 Jun 2006
Posts: 932
Location: England

PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2006 10:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, Surtur or Surtr was a fire giant and the island was the result of undersea volcanic activity. The island formed in the sea... then was drawn back under the waves... extinguished poor old Surtur!

Quote:
why velvet became velvet and hessian became hessian (or why hessian is burlap


Ooh, set me a puzzle why don't you?! Now I have GOT to find out these. Hessian I suppose came from Hesse in Germany, but I don't know why it's called burlap. I'll check out velvet.
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Raven



Joined: 07 Apr 2006
Posts: 46
Location: Vermont, USA

PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2006 5:14 pm    Post subject: Food-related weird word Reply with quote

I've just remembered a word my mother used to use when I asked her what was for dinner. To my knowledge it has never appeared in print, so I'll just have to approximate the spelling as I heard it -- all one word, said very fast:

ledlosetoketchmeddlers

She was originally from the South (USA) and told me, when I pressed for a definition, that the expanded or slow version is "laid low to catch meddlers" and refers to a snare or trap placed low, to catch folks who are meddling where they shouldn't be.

I fail to see how a child's question about dinner could be construed as meddling. Maybe her mother (very busy with 7 children) used it on her. I blush to confess that I used it on my own children when they were young. As a description of dinner, it doesn't sound very appetizing!
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Griffin



Joined: 09 Jun 2006
Posts: 932
Location: England

PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2006 7:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Raven,

That is a fab word! Perhaps what she was implying was that what was in the pot was what had got curious and caught! As would the questioner if they weren't careful!!! Shocked

I like that you can hear the sound of it being spoken in the way you've written it tho'. I'm definitely going to have to use it!

Well, Hessian was short for the Hessian boot, a long boot worn by the Hessian soldiers according to the Dictionary. According to the very same Dictionary, velvet comes from the Latin villus - a tuft.
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Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2006 9:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Reading Raven's post pertaining to, ledlosetoketchmeddlers , reminded me of a word I ran across in the sixth grade while studying about my Welsh heritage. It is the name of a town in Wales that has, (or did?), the longest name in the world.

Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch

I still have no clue as to the pronunciation, though I have read that it comes out ridiculously short of the spelling. The Welsh language is a marvel. I have tried a few times to learn it, as it is a dying language but, am always defeated.
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Griffin



Joined: 09 Jun 2006
Posts: 932
Location: England

PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2006 9:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Erin,

Yes, Llanfair is still there and has a train station, with possibly the longest station board!!! The name has a lovely meaning, something about the white deer by the brook or something like that. And it is always wonderful to watch journalists taking a deep breath before they try to say it... shortly before a smiling local tells them that they call it Llanfair for short!!! Laughing

Clotilde has a good one in her piece on the faisselle (possibly where our word vessel comes from), metonymy and I like to think it came in to play too! The more I read your writing Clotilde, the more I imagine the novel you'd write... Like Zucchini for Chocolate perhaps?
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charlsy



Joined: 08 Aug 2006
Posts: 136
Location: France, Bordeaux

PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2006 11:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I do love the sound of swell, euphonious, quirky, and scrumptious ! Also some of the insults used by Captain Haddock in "Tintin" : bashibouzouk fills me with joy ! Serendipity, melliflous, and one used in the dubbed version of "Star Wars" : méphitique, a french word for a foul smell. Not commonly used.... Also Méphistophélès, Hatchepsout. I like strange names...
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Judy



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 1196
Location: buried under a pile of books somewhere in Adelaide, South Australia

PostPosted: Thu Sep 21, 2006 12:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch means "St Mary's Church in a hollow by the white hazel close to the rapid whirlpool by the red cave of St Tysilio".

Thank you Paul Theroux - The Kingdom by the Sea: A Journey Around the Coast of Great Britain

Cellar door - JRR Tolkien's favourite sounding word, and perhaps also Edgar Allan Poe's, according to some sources.
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