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Learning about wine
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Barbara



Joined: 13 Nov 2004
Posts: 899
Location: Gold Coast Australia

PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 8:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Judy - I've seen the Jacob's Creek Sparkling Rose advertised in OZ mags but have not seen it around Auckland yet.

Dawna - I once matched a brilliant pinot gris with a green chicken curry and it was a disaster, which is why I stick to beer with curry now.
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JustMe



Joined: 13 Apr 2005
Posts: 213
Location: Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 8:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome, Dawna.

Unfortunately because this is a "wine competition" I cannot really go with beer....though I totally agree with you...I think beer would be much better suited for the lamb currry. I am seriously considering taking one white and one red so that we can do a better comparison. Also since we're responsible for the main course wine...and the 3rd course in...I can't really switch to beer after having tried (in theory) 4 other wines. I was really hoping to get the dessert course because there are so many great things you can do with dessert wines now.

Several years ago our LCBO had a big feature on BC wines & one of my favourites was North 44 (I think). I haven't seen it lately.

As for rose, I can't drink sweet wine...instant headache. (Honest: 2 sips & I'm in migraine country). However, several years ago I chanced upon...and I believe it was a blush shiraz from France....not really a rose. Actually, I guess it would have been Syrah if it was from France. I say Shiraz...you say Syrah. It was very lovely...not too sweet: haven't seen it in ages, either.

On the same note, I read a very interesting article (maybe last year?) that talked about how our tastes in wine have evolved over the past 20 years. It talked about how when we were just starting out drinking wine (those of us in our "middle ages") were drinking things like Portuguese Mateus and alot of German reislings. (much too sweet for me now). Black Tower was popular in my twenties as was Green Gold. I think you can still get Black Tower, but I haven't seen Green Gold in eons. Very few people drank red wine back then (at least not a good red wine). My first red wine was beaujolais & ever since then it has been onward & upward. Now I find beaujolais too light; I like a good "big" red wine.

Barbara wrote:
I once matched a brilliant pinot gris with a green chicken curry and it was a disaster, which is why I stick to beer with curry now.
You must have posted this while I was composing this message. Maybe I should get my friends to change the menu....Oh dear....now the pressure is on.
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Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 8:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome Dawna! I love Vancouver and hope to live there at some point. Whenever I visit I always stock up on wine from the Okanogan. In fact I only have one bottle left that I have been eyeing lately.

I totally agree with it being hard to match wine to curries and usually follow the beer road. There is a curry house in Seattle called, The Mandalay Cafe with a fabulous wine selection and their pairing suggestions have always been a hit with me. To anyone visiting Seattle, check it out!
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Barbara



Joined: 13 Nov 2004
Posts: 899
Location: Gold Coast Australia

PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 9:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just found this site and it could be the answer Justme. Here it is: http://wineforspice.com/ I'm sure you will find some suggestions there from someone who has stepped outside the "beersquare".

Nowdays not all rose is sweet...it has improved since we all drank Mateus.......and then decorated our flats with candles in the empty bottle!
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simona



Joined: 11 Mar 2005
Posts: 696
Location: israel

PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 9:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello Just me, I just realized that there are three full pages dealing with what wine could match a curried lamb dish in a wine contest. As yet, the only wine most of you agree will match this dish is .... beer. Then, pragmatical me, thought: why don't you change the dish if there is no wine to match it ?

P.S. I know it's kitchy, but I love Matheus Rose though I hate sweet wines.
P.S. Maybe Champagne could befriend this curried lamb?

No more war, more good wine!
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JustMe



Joined: 13 Apr 2005
Posts: 213
Location: Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 10:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the link, Barbara. Those wines are sold only in Britain but they gave me an idea of what I should be looking for. The recommend a "slightly sparkling" wine that is a good alternative to beer. However, I did note that they were talking about dry curries.
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Dawna



Joined: 04 May 2005
Posts: 125
Location: Vancouver

PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 10:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Barbara - was it a Thai green curry? I'd be hard pressed to think of any wine that would go with that, I think.

JustMe - a friend of mine swears by Marechal Foch for spicy food, but I can't really imagine it with curry. I may be off the wall, here, but what about a slightly sweet Italian red? A nice Masi Campofiorin Ripasso, with raisin-y overtones, but not quite the subtlety (which would be lost) of Amarone? Other than that, I would be tempted just to go for a very fruit-forward, light red.

Good grief - Mateus! I'm familiar with it... hee! "Some say, a little too familiar!"- Bruce McCullogh, Kids in the Hall

I don't go for rose that often. Gray Monk, here in BC, makes a decent Rotberger, which is fairly good barbecue-patio wine. It's been a long time since I did a tasting on roses.

Generally speaking, I prefer red to white, and I like my default reds big, feisty and on the young side.

Thanks for the lovely welcome, everyone!
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Barbara



Joined: 13 Nov 2004
Posts: 899
Location: Gold Coast Australia

PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 3:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dawna - Belated welcome aboard greetings. It was for a friends wedding and I was told the chicken would be served in a cream sauce. I had chosen the pinot gris to match the preceeding course, knowing it would also suit the chicken for anyone that wanted to stay with that wine. When it was served and I saw it was a curried cream sauce I prayed everyone would order the fish option! No one complained and luckily the bride and groom were too much in love to be bothered . Plus it was such a brilliant NZ Pinot Gris everyone was happy to drink it.

I LOOOVE Amarone and have a bottle of 1995 Masi Amarone which I should open soon but once I open it, it will be gone forever. Somedays I take it off the shelf to just look at it. We opened the last one I had on the spur of the moment when someone at the table said "I don't like Italian wine".

Justme - there will be no shortage of converstation at this dinner - you'll be able to state opinions on the curry/wine match from all over the world.
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Dawna



Joined: 04 May 2005
Posts: 125
Location: Vancouver

PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 4:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah, the pain of incomplete information! The fact that the cream sauce was curried... must have not seemed important? Ah, at least you had a good wine that was tasty on its own, even if it didn't quite go.

We're big fans of amarone, but tend to use it as a special occasion wine.
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JustMe



Joined: 13 Apr 2005
Posts: 213
Location: Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 5:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Look what I found: http://www.sterlingvineyards.com/recipes/world%20cuisine/curriedlamb.htm?RhRemDetails=1&RhLanguage=en&RhFlashEnabled=1&RhReferer=sterlingvineyards.com I might actually be able to get one of their choices here.

Another site recommended Columbia Crest Cabernet Sauvignon (a Washington State wine....never had US wine that wasn't from California or NY) or Wynns Coonawarra Cabernet Sauvignon from Australia or a Gewurztraminer. And oh yes...Heineken lager.

I tell you by the time I get to this dinner party I will be well versed in what does and does not go with curried lamb!
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Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 8:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A lot of people really like Columbia Crest wine, I am not one of those. If you are going to try a Washington State Cabernet Sauvignon try Chateau Ste. Michelle. I will confess that I am not the greastest resource as I am not a fan of cabs unless they are in a blend.
If you are interested in checking it out look for labels from Walla Walla which is a real up and coming area. I personally am obsessed with Oregon wines especially the pinots. One type I love is Argyle Pinot Noir Reserve, mmmm! It is so smooth and buttery, I have to be careful of how much of it I have at one time.
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Dawna



Joined: 04 May 2005
Posts: 125
Location: Vancouver

PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 9:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh, Erin! Finally, another person who doesn't care for cabernet sauvignon straight up, but likes it in a blend! I've had only a couple that I thought were worth drinking on their own. I don't much care for merlot on its own, either. There's a reason the Bordeaux blends were invented!

Here in BC we get a lot of Washington State and Oregon wines. I'll have to watch for that Argyle Pinot Noir Reserve.

JustMe, I'm not crazy about Columbia Crest wines - the ones I've had were not awful, but neither were they much good. Restaurant house wine, is how I think of them. Perhaps they've got some reserves that are good, though, I don't know.

I like Coonawarra's shiraz, but I haven't had their cabernet sauvignon. Australian wines are nice and predictable, and quite tasty even in the lower price range. I can't think of a great Australian wine experience, but they're usually a safe bet for drinkability.
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Barbara



Joined: 13 Nov 2004
Posts: 899
Location: Gold Coast Australia

PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 9:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dawna - just quickly before I go to yoga
Some good Aussies:
Joseph cab sav/merlot '99 (made in Amarone style) -not ready for drinking yet.
Ross Estate Old Vine Grenache 01
Wirra Wirra The Angelus (any year- we've just drunk some '97) They have recently dropped the Angelus name and just call it Cabernet Sauvignon.

Several Australian companies are currently blending shiraz (syrah) with a little viognier. I haven't tried any but have read a couple of positive reviews.
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JustMe



Joined: 13 Apr 2005
Posts: 213
Location: Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 9:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Erin wrote:
A lot of people really like Columbia Crest wine, I am not one of those.


Dawna wrote:
JustMe, I'm not crazy about Columbia Crest wines - the ones I've had were not awful, but neither were they much good. Restaurant house wine, is how I think of them. Perhaps they've got some reserves that are good, though, I don't know.


Trust me...I won't be taken that one! Thanks for the feedback....you might just have saved me some embarassment! I'm thinking that I might have to buy 2 bottles of each wine that I'm taking...and try them out before hand....just to be sure

Now I've had the (Calif) Sterling Vineyards Vintner's Collection Cabernet Sauvignon and it was delightful and a Kendall Jackson (also Calif) cabernet that was very good. Lately I have been drinking Shiraz: many from Australia and have quite enjoyed them Longflat is one of the regulars I drink.

I'm checking the LCBO listings as I type this. There is an Argyle Pinot Noir 2001 at $22.95 CAD. The only wine from Walla Walla is $54/bottle...just a little too steep for this (especially if it doesn't match the food). The Chateau Ste. Michelle is available at $29.95 CAD.

This could turn out very expensive if I have to try all these beforehand. Laughing Thanks for the recommendations & especially the heads up about the Columbia Crest wines.
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Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
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Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Fri May 06, 2005 12:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

JustMe, The regular Argyle is worth it but if you can find the reserve it is TOTALLY worth it. Another nice one and easy on the pocket book is Bogle's Petit Syrah, infact most wines I have had by them have been fantastic and only around $10 USD.
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