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Jerusalem artichokes/Sunchokes
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2005 10:09 pm    Post subject: Jerusalem artichokes/Sunchokes Reply with quote

I was across the street this morning taking a break from work shopping for a few things at our local health food store. There in the produce department I spyed a tub of water with what looked like oddly shaped potatoes. Thought this peculiar and checked the hand written sign beneath them. Well they are Jerusalem artichokes, something I've never even seen before let alone eaten. Needless to say I bought some. Now what do I do? Epicurious.com only has one artichoke/arugula salad using these little beasties!
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mangolassi



Joined: 09 Nov 2004
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2005 10:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

They're really, really good roasted. There was a recipe in the NY Times a couple years ago that worked well for me, though it's so simply it's hardly a recipe: Brown them in a skillet with olive oil and some fresh thyme, and then roast them at 350 degrees F for twenty minutes.
I haven't prepared them many times but my understanding is that you can treat them exactly as you would small potatoes -- slice them and bake them in a gratin, or boil until tender and puree . . . etc.
Enjoy!
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2005 11:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like them just sliced thin. Mabbee dip the edges in a little lemon or lime juice and roll them in a bit of a mild chili powder. They have a lovely crunch and a nice mild flavor. They're also good in spears as the stirring stick for a bloody Mary. Or julienned on a salad.
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Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Wed Jan 26, 2005 1:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

David, I totally recommend trying them in a gratin. I just made one with fennel and potato the jerusalem artichoke would go perfectly! I used olive oil, lemon juice, garlic, salt, pepper and a bit of parmesan. It was so wonderful, my family fell in love!
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Fkhatibloo



Joined: 26 Jan 2005
Posts: 1
Location: San Francisco, CA

PostPosted: Wed Jan 26, 2005 6:12 am    Post subject: Jerusalem artichokes/sunchokes Reply with quote

I just discovered these for the first time, too! They arrived in our CSA delivery last week, and hubby and I totally fell in love with them.

I tried to find a recipe in Bittman, but even he had very little to say about it. I put a little post on my blog...

http://sfmcclures.blogs.com/gastronomie/2005/01/but_what_is_it_.html
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Wed Jan 26, 2005 4:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks folks!! I appreciate the suggestions.
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melinda



Joined: 01 Oct 2004
Posts: 256
Location: Richmond, VA, usa

PostPosted: Wed Jan 26, 2005 4:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm with Erin and the gratin......with some buttered breadcrumbs on top....a sort of nutty, rich flavor
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Fri Jan 28, 2005 5:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you didn't get a chance to check out Fkhatibloo's blog please make some time, it is delightful!
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Kymmco



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 1
Location: Seattle, WA

PostPosted: Sat Jan 29, 2005 2:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been reading a good cookbook that has several Jerusalem artichoke recipes. It's called Winter Harvest Cookbook: How to Select and Prepare Fresh Seasonal Produce All Winter Long by Lane Morgan and it's published by Sasquatch Books here in Seattle. The focus is on winter vegetables of the Pacific Northwest.

I've never eaten or cooked a Jerusalem artichoke either, but this cookbook made me want to run out and find some!
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Dairy_Queen



Joined: 29 Jan 2005
Posts: 342
Location: Chicago and other places

PostPosted: Sun Jan 30, 2005 4:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ooooo, David, you're a lucky guy for finding Jerusalem artichokes at this time of year.

I know that there's a Cookbook Thread somewhere on this site, because I saw it when I joined up, but....hands down...out of the 500+ cookbooks that I own, my favorite is THE ESSENTIAL ROOT VEGETABLE COOKBOOK by Sally and Martin Stone. Per week, I use it 2 to 3 times.

Here's a tiny blurb from the Jerusalem artichoke section: "The Jerusalem artichoke is native to the Americas. The plant was popular with the early settlers who found the Indians cultivating it and sent it back to Europe in 1616. When Lewis and Clark journeyed across our continent for two and a half years, between 1804 and 1806, they and their forty man party had no choice but to survive on wild plants and roots. The Jerusalem artichoke was one of these.

First called the Canadian Potato, Jerusalem artichokes are widely grown and well loved in England, and especially on the continent---unlike in it's homeland, where it is practically unknown and definitely underused.

Besides pickling them, you can serve Jerusalem artichokes raw, sliced, or chunked into salads, adding a nice almost spicy (but NOT hot or biting), clean, crisp taste and texture; steamed with butter or a cream sauce; mashed alone or with potatoes; made into soup with potatoes, onions, celery, and herbs; fried in batter, like tempura;sautéed with garlic; and eaten out of hand with a sprinkling of salt." (there's much more; I edited it)

This book always has a couple of pages of wonderful history about each root vegetable, which is fascinating, and then specifics regarding varieties, availability, storage, what to look for, and basic preparation.

But Wait! There's more!!

Then, they will list pages and pages of recipes, from sweet to savory for the veggie in question.

I haven't been here long enough to know if we can post recipes or not, but if we can't and anybody wants Jerusalem artichoke recipes for the following, just PM me and I'll send them to you. Otherwise, if I can post them, I'll do it in this thread.
*Jerusalem artichoke and chicken salad in Mustard Mayonnaise
*Sauté of Jerusalem artichokes, Cucumbers, and Peppers
*Marion Wiener's Louisiana Jerusalem artichoke Pickles
*Jerusalem artichoke and Pork Stew with Olives and Ginger
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Mon Jan 31, 2005 5:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey D.Q.! Thanks for the history lesson, fascinating stuff. One of the things that caught my eye was the fact they were on a counter in a tub of water! Any idea why? I could just ask the owner of course but I rarely see her.

And certainly post a recipe or two!!
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Dairy_Queen



Joined: 29 Jan 2005
Posts: 342
Location: Chicago and other places

PostPosted: Mon Jan 31, 2005 6:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

David wrote:
Hey D.Q.! Thanks for the history lesson, fascinating stuff. One of the things that caught my eye was the fact they were on a counter in a tub of water! Any idea why? I could just ask the owner of course but I rarely see her.

And certainly post a recipe or two!!


David: I looked at the "Storage" suggestions for J.A. in my book and it states: "Kept in the refrigerator, the tubrs should stay fresh for a week or two." NO WHERE in the book does it suggest that they should be kept in water! It just doesn't make sense, truthfully. Would the grocery man keep carrots or turnips stored in water, because rightfully, they're root vegetables, too. I'd be worrried that they would have their vitamins leached out or if the water wasn't changed daily, that they would just get slimey...ickie poo!

In the section for "Basic Preparation", it states: "All they require is a good scrubbing with a brush to get them grit-free. The skin is edible."

Of the 4 recipes I listed, which two would you like me to post? They are quite lengthy so I don't want to be typing away for nothing.
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Tue Feb 01, 2005 7:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great Dairy Queen, just the saute recipe would be fine, if it's not too much bother.

Very peculiar about the water, I agree!
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Dairy_Queen



Joined: 29 Jan 2005
Posts: 342
Location: Chicago and other places

PostPosted: Tue Feb 01, 2005 7:21 pm    Post subject: SAUTE OF JERUSALEM ARTICHOKES, CUCUMBERS, AND PEPPERS Reply with quote

David wrote:
Great Dairy Queen, just the saute recipe would be fine, if it's not too much bother.

Very peculiar about the water, I agree!


No problemo, David; here it is!
********************************************************

SAUTE OF JERUSALEM ARTICHOKES, CUCUMBERS, AND PEPPERS

Serves 6

1 pound of Jerusalem artichokes, scrubben well and cut into 1/4 inch rounds
2 medium cucumbers, scrubbed, ends trimmed, cut into half length-wise, seeded, and cut into 1/4 inch slices
1 Tablespoon of Unsalted Butter
1 Tablespoon of Olive Oil (your choice of EVOO or not! Laughing )
1 Red Bell Pepper, seeded, deveined, and cut into 1/4 inch slices
1 Yellow Bell Pepper, seeded, deveined, and cut into 1/4 inch slices
1 teaspoon of Dried Thyme, crumbled
1/2 teaspoon of Freshly Ground Black Pepper

In a medium saucepan over moderately hight heat, bring salted water to a boil. Add the Jerusalem artichocke and cook about 1 minute. Add the cucumbers to the same boiling water and cook until just tender, abuot 1 minute. Drain both vegetables in a colander and pat dry with paper towels.

Melt butter with the oil in a large saute pan or skillet over moderately high heat. When the foam subsides, add the bell peppers and cook, stirring frequently, until heated through but still crisp, about 2 minutes.

Add the Jerusalem artichokes and cucumbers and cook, stirring, until just heated through, about 3 minutes. Stir in thyme, salt and pepper.

Serve immediately with grilled meat, fish or chicken.
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mel p



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 10
Location: hamburg, germany

PostPosted: Thu Feb 10, 2005 10:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

david,
i always roast them, but they also make lovely soup, along the lines of "saute some onions/garlic, add j.a., (and praps some potato) and stock, cook, puree". and as for the storing them in water thing: huh? i've only ever kept them in a cool place like carrots.

best not kept for too long. and just a scrub before you roast them - they're too fiddly to peel. if you ARE peeling them, they'll discolour quickly, so you need acidulated water handy. they're wonderfully nutty, i love 'em.
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