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no knead bread - and GOOOOOOD!
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Donna



Joined: 14 Oct 2005
Posts: 827
Location: Oakland, CA

PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 2006 7:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sam tried a loaf last night. He used 1 C. bread flour, 1 C. semolina and 1 C. cornmeal and added some millet for crunch. He also added one tablesoon of olive oil AND one tablespoon of almond meal. It's very flat & dense, although the taste is excellent. We surmise that between the two new variables - oil & almond meal - there is too much fat and it might have smothered the yeast. So - lucky me Cool - this weekend he will try again with ONLY the olive oil.

Has anyone else tried putting oil in this recipe?

Another hint I have for folks - from observing Sam - is instead of flour to coat the bread, use a combo of grains. Sam uses oat bran and coarse ground corn meal and it does two things...it really separates it from the towel so there's no stickiness AND it has a little extra crunch on the crust that I LOVE!

It is so nice to have my own personal baker! Laughing Laughing Laughing
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 2006 9:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Donna- I was wondering how adding oil went. I don't know much about how fat affects dough. I mean I know it makes it richer and softer. But I don't know how yeast tolerates or interacts with it.

I make holiday breads that have egg yolk, sour cream, butter, etc. They rise. But they have a close texture and either need some support or only make mounded shapes.

I'll have to do some reading to see what I can learn about it. But probably not before Christmas.
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life-of-spice



Joined: 14 Sep 2006
Posts: 10
Location: Boulder, Colorado, USA

PostPosted: Fri Dec 15, 2006 12:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was so excited when this recipe came out I made it within days of publication. The reason is becasue I've always hated making bread...because I've hated kneading...because I'm short and kitchen counters are too high to make kneading comfortable. I just can't put my body into it and get any leverage and I end with achey shoulders and neck. It's such an awful chore, and taking it to the lower coffee table only gets flour all over the living room. So, I was totally excited when my first loaf of bread in years came out marvelous! It was a tiny bit doughy, but in a good way and I loved it. I can't wait to read this thread more in depth for suggestions on variations. Tell all your vertically-challenged friends!
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woodstocker



Joined: 08 Dec 2005
Posts: 224
Location: kingston, ny

PostPosted: Sat Dec 16, 2006 12:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Success! I used a 4 qt (?) Pyrex casserole that made a perfect boule. I used Clotilde's oiled bowl method instead of the floured towel, and it worked out just fine. I did forget to dust the dish and top with cornmeal before I baked it, but the loaf released just fine, which I was a little worried about (all for nothing). My friends and I managed to restrain ourselves from eating the whole thing, but that was only because we had just finished a great meal of homemade chicken tikka and plaow (green pea pilaf). Shortbread cookies dipped in chocolate were on order for dessert. Here's a pic of the bread man can live on bread alone
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Sat Dec 16, 2006 4:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Woodstocker--that looks absolutely mouthwatering! (and I love chichen tikka too!!)
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woodstocker



Joined: 08 Dec 2005
Posts: 224
Location: kingston, ny

PostPosted: Sat Dec 16, 2006 8:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks David. A couple of my really close friends here at school are Pakistani (Desi), and I've made dinner for them on several occasions, so they repaid with a traditional meal, which was all good with me. Including the fact that I got to keep some of the left over pilaf. Wink
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Jaffolk



Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Posts: 24
Location: Leverkusen, Germany

PostPosted: Sun Dec 17, 2006 1:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So, my second loaf was a huge success. The dough rested about 48 hours, because I didn't have the time to bake bread the night I originally planned to. Then I used the bowl and olive oil method. I actually liked this one even better... as I said I used 75% white flour and 25% whole wheat. Great mix and probably the one I'll stick to for a while, although I'm keen on experimenting.

I'll make the next one tomorrow morning, since we are invited for a birthday brunch. We'll see how that turns out.

Anyway, pictures of my bread can be found at http://www.flickr.com/photos/45306223@N00/tags/nokneadbread/

Sorry for the bad picture quality, but I have to use my old camera, since our fancy expensive one is broken.
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woodstocker



Joined: 08 Dec 2005
Posts: 224
Location: kingston, ny

PostPosted: Sun Dec 17, 2006 2:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My next loaf is going to be part whole wheat too. I was reading that people were having luck w/ 1 part ww, 2 parts ap. So I might go with that proportion, unless people think otherwise? When I get home, I'm going to experiement with other flours, probably starting with rye. I was wondering if the high heat would burn sesame seeds if I put them on top. Any ideas?

(Jaffolk, your bread looks good too. Good luck getting your camera fixed.)
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vb_lady



Joined: 05 Oct 2006
Posts: 3
Location: Washington, DC

PostPosted: Mon Dec 18, 2006 6:11 pm    Post subject: Exciting! Reply with quote

I finally got to the no knead bread this weekend. I needed to up the salt as it was a little bland. I used about 1/3 whole what and 2/3 bread flour and that seemed to work well, kind of nutty, but not overly heavy.

Have people been proofing their yeast first? I proofed mine with a little honey and warm water. I can't seem to skip this step. There is something about the bubbling of the yeast that is satisfying and I'm always afraid something is off with my yeast.

The dough rose for about 18 hours and then I tried the flour on kitchen towels, but way too sticky. I'm going to use the greased bowl next time.

I got a great crust, the best I have ever achieved and the crumb was really good. A little springy, but I like that. We ate some bread last night with really good olive oil and sea salt and I had some today for my sandwich. So good.
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sunny12



Joined: 18 Dec 2006
Posts: 9
Location: Ottawa, ON

PostPosted: Mon Dec 18, 2006 9:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This the first bread with yeast I've ever made (and I have to say the posts in this forum were really helpful). The first time I made it it was a big mess because I used too much water, so the dough stuck everywhere and I lost half of it in the process. I stuck what i could in the oven fearing the worst--but it came out amazingly well. I made a second loaf this weekend using exactly 1 1/2 cups of warm water and the dough was soooooo easy to work with--it didn't stick anywhere. I also used 1/2 cup of whole wheat flour for 1/2 cup of white. My boyfriend (who's a good cook himself) was quite impressed with the results.
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Last edited by sunny12 on Thu Feb 03, 2011 10:03 am; edited 1 time in total
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Donna



Joined: 14 Oct 2005
Posts: 827
Location: Oakland, CA

PostPosted: Tue Dec 19, 2006 7:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

vb lady, I think in one of the articles from NYTimes, Bittman states explicitly that there's no need to proof the yeast. Sam hasn't proofed ever and he's made 5-6 successful loaves.
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birgit



Joined: 31 Jan 2005
Posts: 247
Location: Germany

PostPosted: Wed Dec 20, 2006 3:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I found it helpful to watch the video and especially to take a look at the consistency of the dough. Mine was too dry first (I think it depends on the type of flour you use) and so I added some more water. First I added too much water (I found out after all was incorporated), then, after adding more flour, the consistency looked o.k. No need to add more yeast, his dough seems to be quite forgiving Smile
And, vb lady, the recipe says instant yeast, not fresh yeast = no proofing necessary (I buy instant yeast in little sealed sachets, so it's guaranteed that the yeast is still o.k.).
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Donna



Joined: 14 Oct 2005
Posts: 827
Location: Oakland, CA

PostPosted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 11:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's been a long time since we've discussed this bread, but I want to share a recent variation on the theme!

You may know that Sam is the baker in our house. I tried baking once upon a time (well, several times, actually), I was terrible and I didn't care enough to pursue it further. I can happily go weeks without eating bread and, at the time, I lived in Berkeley where there were gourmet bakeries on every other street corner. So When Sam elected to pursue this (because he can't go 4 hours without bread), I was FINE with that! And he is a great baker - stimulated I think by the SCIENCE of baking. He loves tinkering with the ingredients and studying the chemistry behind it.

However, a couple of weeks ago, we had promised to bring bread to a bar-be-que with friends and Sam was not home for 2 days before the dinner - so he goaded me into making the bread. He has created about 20 recipes for no knead bread. I picked one with corn meal & semolina & millet, because I like the crunch. And then at the end I got creative and threw in sun dried tomatoes, chopped olives and pignoli. Much to my delight it turned out quite well and was a big hit at the bar-be-que! And I liked it, too! Enough to make it again.

So, here's my Mediterranean variation of Sam's variation on a theme by Jim Lahey:

- 1 cup polenta or coarse ground corn meal
- 1 cup semolina flour
- 1/2 cup white whole wheat flour
- 1/2 cup bread flour
- 1/4 cup millet
- 1 5/8 cup water
- 1 1/2 teaspoons sea salt or fleur de sel
- 3/4 teaspoon regular dry yeast
- 2 teaspoons gluten
- 2 teaspoons wheat germ
- 1/2 cup (or a little more, if you wish) sun dried tomatoes in olive oil (I just (blithely)included the olive oil, which turns out to be a bit less than 1 tablespoon)
- 1/2 cup chopped black olives - (kalamata or nicoise work well - just not canned black olives!)
- 1/2 cup pignoli - lightly toasted

The directions are the exact same as for any loaf of no knead bread:
• Mix all the ingredients together
• Cover the bowl and leave in a protected place to rise for 14-18 hours
• After it has risen for 14-18 hours and 3 hours before you want to take the finished product out of the oven, take the dough and put it on a floured board, fold it in half 2-3 times and form a boule
• Place the boule in a HEAVILY floured cloth - linen or tightly woven cotton - and let it rest undisturbed for 2 hours. Sprinkle the top with coarse ground corn meal, wheat germ or both.
•1 1/2 hours after you form the boule, place your pot with lid in the oven and crank it up to 450º F.
• After 1/2 hour, take the pot out and carefully roll the dough into the pot. Sprinkle some more corn meal on top, if needed, and cover. Put back in the oven.
• After 30 minutes, remove the lid. Continue to bake for 25-30 minutes more. It should be a dark rich color and sound hollow on the bottom when thumped with your fingers.

This was great at a bar-be-que and would be great for any number of other meals - salade nicoise, grilled chicken or fish, grilled lamb.

I am not planning on taking over the bread baking any time soon, Sam's job is safe! But it's good to know that in a pinch, I CAN make a loaf of bread!

Laughing
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Last edited by Donna on Fri Aug 03, 2007 4:31 am; edited 1 time in total
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2007 3:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm always delighted to see this topic reappear, it's so much fun to make this stuff. But wow Donna, I wouldn't have recognized this as Lahey bread (mine contains flourwatersaltyeast--just one ingredient!)
The original contains 1/4 teaspoon yeast, but Sam uses 3/4?
The whole recipe is interesting--is the semolina the grainy Cream of Wheat stuff, or semolina flour? This seems to have so much stuff in it that isn't flour, so it must be very--dense isn't the word--hearty? Coarse? (in a good way!)
Wish my circumstances allowed for more experimenting.
Anyway, this sounds delicious--and soon it will be soup season.
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Donna



Joined: 14 Oct 2005
Posts: 827
Location: Oakland, CA

PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2007 4:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gingerpale, I meant to add the word "flour' after semolina. Ooops! I'd better do that now!

And I think he added yeast to support the tomatoes & olives and pine nuts. I think...

It is coarse - in a good way with LOTS of crunch. Which is why it appeals to me. If Sam and I had to exist on bread alone, I would eat the crust and he would eat the inside! A match made in heaven! Wink

Another thing about this recipe is that the bread is a lovely orange-y yellow color when you slice it. It looks like the sun! Cool
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