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what's allways in your fridge???
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swan



Joined: 23 Nov 2004
Posts: 450
Location: a Dutchie in HongKong

PostPosted: Sun Feb 06, 2005 11:31 pm    Post subject: what's allways in your fridge??? Reply with quote

Inspired by the convenient-products I wonder what you guys like to keep in stock, inside and outside your fridges...?

In my fridge:always: milk, eggs, butter,cheese in some form, mayo.And most of the time: yoghurt, orange juice, diet coke, gherkins, white wine, and if I'm lucky fresh vegetables and stuff for dinner Smile
Usually there is some fruit around as well.

In the cupboard, apart from the usual stock of flour and olive oil and sugar and so on, there is : dried pasta, tomatosauce, tea, canned tomatosoup, canned tuna, canned veggies (i'm the 'you never know'kind-a-girl), chocolatebiscuits, stockcubes and the funny and odd things I find abroad in far-away supermarkets and then forget about them (found a 2001-package of crema catalana the other day)
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Dairy_Queen



Joined: 29 Jan 2005
Posts: 342
Location: Chicago and other places

PostPosted: Mon Feb 07, 2005 1:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the frig, during the Winter, when I'm home, it's always: eggs, lard, milk, 1/2 & 1/2, mustards, pickles and juice. During Summer months, when I'm gone from home 90% of the time...nothing. It's empty.

I consider myself a Master Baker, so in the pantry, at ALL times is: baking soda and powder; different sugars (brown, light and dark); molasses, light and dark; powdered sugar; at least 40 pounds of flour; every spice known to man and woman; natural flavourings such as vanilla, almond and peppermint; every type of chip that Nestle's makes; and the Usual Suspects: Worchestershire Sauce, Soy, Tabasco; Liquid Smoke. Onions, garlic and Yukon Gold potatoes are also standards in the Winter. I love making my own salad dressings so I have a special shelf for all the oils and vinegars that I collect: from fig to pear to blood orange vinegars to basil, garlic and olive oil. There's more, but I'm too lazy to list them all.

I haunt the bakery aisles each week and stock up on all the things that are expensive for baking, when they are on sale. That way, I always have 3-4 boxes of Saran Wrap; Parchment Paper; Wax Paper and Aluminum Foil. Also, because I treat my kitchen like a Science Lab, I will not put a single item away without taking a large Magic Marker and putting in LARGE NUMBERS the date that I bought things. Since I've been doing this for decades, my spices are always fresh and new come the holidays, and I've purchased them when they were on sale, so it's not a dent to my wallet when Christmas comes around.

Plus, I have a massive upright freezer, so I buy butter and nuts when they are on sale and have those around 24/7 so that I can whip up pretty much any baked good when the mood strikes me.

When I grocery shop, I carry a list with me and stick to it like a religion. I also know, pretty much in advance, what I want to make that week so I'll buy all the fruit, veggies, meat and fish that I need for that week.

I do allow leeway for new and strange things, but I don't allow junk food in the house, like flavoured crackers, cookies, and crisps in the house. I would just binge on them and then bitch about my weight, so I solve the process by not buying them to begin with. If I want crisps, I buy a small bag, eat them and get done with it.

When I housesit, I'm stunned by how little of a pantry that people have. And these are usually the busiest people who can least afford to run out to the store to buy that "one" mandatory item, like sugar or baking soda.

I take the Boy Scout Motto to heart: Be Prepared! Laughing
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Sarape



Joined: 15 Dec 2004
Posts: 583
Location: Anniston Alabama USA

PostPosted: Mon Feb 07, 2005 5:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I only have a couple cheeses, maybe a head of cabbage, some apples and grapefruit, balsmatic vinegar, jelly, and brown mustard in my fridge.

In the cabinet can be found: 5-pound bags of corn meal, rye, wheat, and bread flour, small bags of brown rice, grits, oatmeal, canned tomato paste, canned pumpkin, dried plums, spices.

Also, each weekend I make a very large pot of vegetable soup based on what I've picked or bought during the week -- usually what's grown locally. And I also make a big pot of brown rice and Wheatena which I use throughout the week in my hot cereal. All my cooking is done on the weekends so that when I get home at night, I usually only spend 30 minutes preparing the evening meal -- which is taking things from the fridge to the stove top for heating and taking bread crackers and cheese and stuff.
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Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Habanero jelly, capers, olives, hot sauce, roquefort, chevre, stock, sauvignon blanc, cream cheese, tamari, fish sauce, preserved lemons, soy milk, greek yogurt, anchovies, chipotles in adobo, marmalade, pecorino, tamrind and tandoori pastes. Those are usually in there.
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Erin- Will you tell me more about the preserved lemons? Right now I have two trees full of Meyer lemons. They'll start going bad soon and I don't know what to do with all of them.

I have preserving books that give a good description of packing them in salt. What I don't know is what it does to the flavor and how they should be used once preserved. Surely they don't retain the flavor of fresh lemons. I think I'll squeeze out and freeze juice for that. I wonder if I grated and dried the rind if it would be superior to a commercial product.
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tea leaves



Joined: 14 Dec 2004
Posts: 57
Location: boston, the home of the bean and the cod

PostPosted: Mon Feb 07, 2005 9:16 pm    Post subject: in the fridge Reply with quote

Always, organic skim milk, pellegrino, buttermilk for baking, lemons, carrots, onions green, red and white, 2 or 3 kinds of greens for salad, chevre, fresh parm, sliced provolone or american for sandwiches, greek yogurt ( from Trader Joes the best), kalamatas, roasted red peppers, too many jams/jellies to name, homemade tomato jam, butter salted and unsalted, eggs, lo sodium soy sauce, ketchup, soy mayonnaise, real mayonaise, colman's english mustard, live yeast for baking, tube of tomato past, de Vine honey balsamic vinaigrette bought by the case at Dave's market in Greewich RI, and Lulu's lemon rosemary marinade for fish, lamb, chicken, veal, sandwich pickles, cornichons, water packed tuna, Sam Adams beer of the week and whatever white wine is the current fave...fascinating glimpses into our lives and psyches don't you think. Lastly, watermelon but sigh...only in summer!
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Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Mon Feb 07, 2005 10:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rainey,

I have preserved lemon myself in the past, but my canning abilities are limited. I tend to think of preserved lemons as being in the same family as olives, anchovies, and other brine/oil packed staple products. They are used frequently in North Africa and the Middle East especially in Morocco. I use them to make chicken or stew in my tagine. One of my favorite ways is to toss them into pasta and adding arugula they pair well together. With preserved lemons you are using the skin instead of the meat.
As far as drying out your own zest, I say try it and let me know the results! I bet you will get a superior product. I dry my herbs for the winter and they taste so much better than anything store bought.

I hope this answers your question. Oh, and if you don't have a tagine I totally recomend owning one. Sur La Table has a great selection of authentic ones.
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"It's watery....and yet there's a smack of ham."

"It's hot ham water."
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swan



Joined: 23 Nov 2004
Posts: 450
Location: a Dutchie in HongKong

PostPosted: Mon Feb 07, 2005 11:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dear tea leaves,

I totally love your signature sentence!!!

Quote:
Nobody can teach you how to make the perfect cup of tea. It just happens over time. Wearing cashmere helps of course


I would love to borrow it and use it at work, at home, in life...May I bring it to Europe?? (imagine my passengers tomorrow if they complain about a delay or so and I tell them they should wear cashmere..Smile )
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brighidsdaughter



Joined: 02 Oct 2004
Posts: 233
Location: Canton, TX USA

PostPosted: Tue Feb 08, 2005 1:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This bit of foodie voyeurism is fun!

One would think I'm preparing for famine or something. I like keeping a variety of food on hand so I seldom have to go to the store for one or 2 items when I have the urge to cook.

In the fridge/freezer: salad greens, selection of fruit, variety of fresh/dried chilies, organic pecans, variety of frozen veg, variety of cheeses, milk, butter, chicken, fish/seafood, deli meat, whole-grain bread, CM bulk fresh pesto, mustard, mayo, vinaigrette, good olives, dill pickles, lemon juice, jam, tamari, fish sauce, sri racha sauce

In the pantry: variety of broths/cubes, pasta sauce, canned tomatoes, soup, legumes, rice, pasta, canned tuna, oils, vinegars, onions, fresh garlic, natural peanut butter

In the garden: enough rosemary for the whole neighborhood
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Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Tue Feb 08, 2005 8:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Brighidsdaughter,

What is sri racha sauce?
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"It's watery....and yet there's a smack of ham."

"It's hot ham water."
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brighidsdaughter



Joined: 02 Oct 2004
Posts: 233
Location: Canton, TX USA

PostPosted: Tue Feb 08, 2005 10:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sri Racha is an Asian-style hot chili sauce. Red, smooth textured, about the consistency of steak sauce, quite spicy. Ingredients: chili, sugar, garlic, salt, distilled vinegar + preservatives & xanthan gum. It comes in a clear plastic squeeze-bottle with a rooster on it & a green top. It's in the Asian foods section of my regular neighborhood grocery store.

I don't know what I did before I found this stuff. Peanut sauce has never been the same.
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Judy



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 1196
Location: buried under a pile of books somewhere in Adelaide, South Australia

PostPosted: Tue Feb 08, 2005 11:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How do you use Sri Racha, brighidsdaughter? In your cooking, as a condiment, marinade, on toast (hey, we Aussies eat vegemite on toast and anything would be better than that, IMHO).

I don't know the sauce at all, but it sounds like my fridge needs a bottle ASAP.
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tennoji



Joined: 08 Jan 2005
Posts: 10
Location: Japan

PostPosted: Tue Feb 08, 2005 11:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My wife cooks mainly Japanese and Chinese dishes and I cook from the rest of the world, so our fridge is a mish-mash of things and neither of us is sure exactly what's in our fridge. Staples are butter, yogurt, eggs, milk, miso, nampla, toubanjan, mustard, tenmenjan and, of course, there always has to be some kind of cheese (not for cooking, but for sustaining the cook during a lengthy experiment).
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Judy



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 1196
Location: buried under a pile of books somewhere in Adelaide, South Australia

PostPosted: Tue Feb 08, 2005 11:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ooooh goody, more new ingredients to learn about....

tennoji, could you tell us more about toubanjan and tenmenjan please?
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tennoji



Joined: 08 Jan 2005
Posts: 10
Location: Japan

PostPosted: Tue Feb 08, 2005 11:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My wife uses them in her Chinese cooking. Tenmenjan is a brown paste that adds a sweet/salty taste (main ingredients miso and sugar). Toubanjan is a red very spicy paste (ingredients are a type of red chile pepper, two misos, garlic, cornstarch)

She uses just a little of these pastes - the taste goes a long way.

Maybe you can find them in an Asian section of your supermarket
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