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Dairy_Queen



Joined: 29 Jan 2005
Posts: 342
Location: Chicago and other places

PostPosted: Thu Feb 17, 2005 11:41 pm    Post subject: Helpful Hints Reply with quote

I couldn't find any other thread to toss this into, so I decided to start a thread that we can all add to, as we find little nuggets of wisdom out there.

I love old cookbooks and sometimes they have knowledge that is just missing from new ones. I love to bake pies and one of the problems I was always having was how to "break down" dough quantity for tarts. Here's a ratio guideline from a 1952 pie book.

PASTRY QUANTITY GUIDELINES

*If using 1 1/2 Cups of flour=1- two crust 9" pie or
2- single crust 9" pies or
1- single crust 10" or 11" pie or
8- 3" tart shells or
4- 4" tart shells

*If using 2 Cups of flour= 1-two crust 9" pie or
2-single crusts 9" pie or
1-single crust 10" or 11" pie or
12-3" tart shells or
6-4" tart shells

*If using 3 Cups of flour= 1-two crust 10" pie or
3-9" single crust pies or
16-3" tart shells or
8-4" tart shells

(I used the two cup ratio this week and it worked out perfectly. I weighed the initial dough and then cut it into equal ounces of dough.)

PIE AND TART SERVING GUIDELINES

8" pie=4-6 slices
9" pie=6 slices
10" pie=8 slices
11" pie=8-12 slices

Hope this helps other bakers. I've not seen any guides like these before.
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Lisa



Joined: 10 Feb 2005
Posts: 20
Location: New York City, USA

PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 2005 8:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just wondered, is this thread for cooking and food tips and hints in general, or specifically baking ones?
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Judy



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 1196
Location: buried under a pile of books somewhere in Adelaide, South Australia

PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 2005 10:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lisa

Anything to do with food cooking - if you have a tip, we'd love you to share it with us!
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Dairy_Queen



Joined: 29 Jan 2005
Posts: 342
Location: Chicago and other places

PostPosted: Wed Feb 23, 2005 11:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Judy: Thanks for reading my mind and posting the RIGHT answer! Yeah, I get so tired of trying to "reinvent" the wheel by digging through cookbooks for pastry dimensions; fish cooking times; shortcuts that I've seen in magazines that really, really work, that I thought it would be nice, with all the vast experience on this board, for posters to share their wisdom.
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Dairy_Queen



Joined: 29 Jan 2005
Posts: 342
Location: Chicago and other places

PostPosted: Tue Apr 26, 2005 4:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just stumbled onto this link, while I was looking up Candlenuts.

It goes right to "Files", allowing you to save it, download, etc.

I downloaded it and saved it in My Documents. It's an astonishingly complex Food Dictionary that describes just about every food on the planet! Hey, if they have a listing for "Candlenuts", it's pretty thorough.

Just wanted to pass this on for anyone else interested:

www.users.bigpond.com/food_matters/Cookin/Printing/Dictionary.doc
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Fri Apr 29, 2005 9:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I bet you guys all know about saving your overripe bananas. I bet you all make yummy banana breads with them too. But here's an alternative: http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,,FOOD_9936_27213,00.html It's Alton Brown's recipe for banana ice cream.

We've had it before. It's easy to do and terrific. I just put another peeled overripe banana in the freezer so I can accumulate enough for another batch.

After I run it through the ice cream maker, I'm going to layer it in a freezer tub with alternating layers of fudge & caramel sauces.
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JustMe



Joined: 13 Apr 2005
Posts: 213
Location: Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Fri Apr 29, 2005 10:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rainey wrote:
After I run it through the ice cream maker, I'm going to layer it in a freezer tub with alternating layers of fudge & caramel sauces.


How decadent! What kind of ice cream maker do you have?
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Fri Apr 29, 2005 11:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had to go look to see. Smile It's a Waring and it's quite old -- maybe 20 years. ...tho it hasn't been used so many times in 20 years.

It makes 2qts. of ice cream with just a couple trays of ice and a box of table salt. That makes it convenient.
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Judy



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 1196
Location: buried under a pile of books somewhere in Adelaide, South Australia

PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2005 12:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dairy_Queen

Thanks so much for posting the link to the Food Dictionary - what a fantastic resource! Very easy to use, with each listing hyperlinked for ease of navigation. It should be in everyone's Recipe folder.

Thanks again
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ometecuhtli2001



Joined: 30 Apr 2005
Posts: 2
Location: Orange County, CA, USA

PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2005 5:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I often use bok choy in stir fries and soups. Especially for stir fries, I do this:

put some water in a pot
put a *tiny* bit of olive oil in (a teaspoon at most)
heat the water to boiling then turn off the heat
put the bok choy in for 30 seconds to a minute

I find it improves the flavor and color, making the bok choy brighter green than it would be otherwise.
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Amber



Joined: 31 Jan 2005
Posts: 29
Location: Brisbane

PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2005 12:38 pm    Post subject: *clears throat* Reply with quote

Would it be breaking the rules to request a tip? If you are a baker, maybe you could answer a question for me, as I'm a little timid in the kitchen.
I recently found a wonderful recipe for Chocolate Delicious that you bake in little ramekins. The dessert is wonderfully flavoured and decadent, but only a thin layer of cake/pudding sits on top of a really large quantity of the sauce that forms, which is a little overwhelming. If I added more flour to the original recipe, might this make the cake layer thicker Question
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2005 5:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe posting the whole recipe or a link to it would be helpful. But, without seeing that, I'd try baking it longer (maybe dropping the temp a bit if you think you'd risk burning the surface) before I added more flour.

Have you calibrated your oven to make sure you're getting the thermal results you think you are? Are you, perhaps, using a convection oven when the recipe is written for a conventional ambient heat oven? Is this recipe intended, perhaps, to make one of the "molten" cakes that have become popular in the last few years?
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Amber



Joined: 31 Jan 2005
Posts: 29
Location: Brisbane

PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2005 7:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Rainey. Here is the recipe I was wondering about:

Chocolate Delicious (from 'Table' magazine)

3 eggs, separated
1 cup (220g) caster sugar
30g butter, melted
1 cup (125mL) milk
3/4 cup (110g) dark chocolate melts, melted
1/2 cup (75g) flour
1/4 cup (20g) dessicated coconut

1. Preheat oven to 180 degrees (celsius). Lightly grease a 6-cup capacity ovenproof dish or 6 x 1-cup capacity ramekins.
2. Using an electric mixer, beat egg yolks with half of sugar in a bowl until thick and creamy. Stir in butter. Fold in milk, chocolate, flour and coconut.
3. In a clean, dry bowl, beat eggwhites until soft peaks form. Gradually beat in remaining sugar until glossy. Fold into chocolate mixture.
4. Pour mixture into prepared dish/es. Place dish/es in a baking pan. Pour enough boiling water into pan to come halfway up sides of dish/es. Bake for 40-45 minutes, or 15-20 minutes for ramekins, until firm. Stand for 10 minutes before serving.


Perhaps if I used a more bitter chocolate and less sugar it would help balance it out also ? It's very very sweet.
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Dairy_Queen



Joined: 29 Jan 2005
Posts: 342
Location: Chicago and other places

PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2005 6:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Judy: You are so, so welcome! That was my goal, with this thread: that if you find amazing sites or info.....SHARE IT! I love researching stuff and inevitably, one link leads to another and I find sites that I could never even imagine typing into a Search Engine. I have, under 'Favorites', a file called FOOD FACTS, with links to sites that help me out. If it's just a page of info, I'll print it out, but if the site is a Black Hole on information, then I just bookmark it.

Here's another one for you to bookmark; you could study this site and actually open up a school, with the information that they host. It's exhausting!

http://www.baking911.com/

Oddly, there is no "Home" page; it's either "Baking 101" or "Cooking 101", etc. You could spend a literal week on this site and never leave it; it's got THAT much information!

Here's just the tiniest example of what I found when I went to "BAKING TERMS" and clicked on the letter "D". I don't know how many people are responsible for this sites content, but it's places like that that give websites legitamacy.


I SURE HOPE YOU ENJOY THIS LINK AS MUCH AS THE OTHER ONE I POSTED! YOU SHOULD CHECK OUT THERE 'NUT' SECTION...MIND-BLOWING!




" Dacquoise: This classic French cake is composed of baked nut meringues layered with buttercream. There are many names for nut meringues and meringue-based desserts -- succès, progrès, japonais among them -- and the proportions, size and type of nut(s) used varies from one to another.
Dash: A measure of dry or liquid ingredient that equals 1/16 teaspoon.
Deci": Prefix in the metric system meaning "one-tenth."
Decorating 101
Decorator's sugar = coarse sugar = decorating sugar: To make your own: To color, put a few drops of food coloring into a jar, then add 4 or 5 tablespoons of white decorator's sugar. Seal the jar and shake.
Deep-fry: Hot fat or oil which is deep enough to cover food during frying.

Deep-Frying: Method of frying food by immersing it in hot fat or oil.

Degerminated: A term for grain foods, such as some brands of cornmeal, that have had the germ removed in the milling process.
Dessert: (di-ZERT) - Meaning an usually sweet food served as the final course of a meal. The word was first recorded in 1600 and it derives from a French word meaning "to clear the table." This etymology is still reflected in current table service, where it is customary to remove everything from the table that's not being used (salt/pepper shakers, breadbaskets, sometimes even flowers) before serving dessert.
Dessert Syrup: A flavored sugar syrup used to flavor and moisten cakes and other desserts.
Devil's Food: a chocolate-flavored product that derives most of its flavor from cocoa butter rather than chocolate.
Devil's Food Cake: A light-textured chocolate cake made with a high percentage of baking soda, which gives the cake a reddish color. Devil's food cake was the favorite dessert of the early 1900s. Devils food cake is usually thought of in terms of dark chocolate, but originally it was red. This was due to a chemical reaction between early varieties of cocoa and baking soda, which also gave the cake a soapy taste. Today cooks, using modern processed cocoa, sometimes add a touch of red food coloring to bring back the authentic color.
Deviled: A term describing food that is dark, rich, chocolately, spicily piquant or stimulating it is "deviled." Means a highly seasoned, chopped, ground, or whole mixture that is served hot or cold. Many foods, including eggs and crab, are served "deviled." The term "deviled" referring to meat, fish, and cheese spreads, is somewhat different. Spiced potted meats have been popular for centuries. William Underwood introduced his famous deviled ham in 1867.
Devonshire Cream: (DEHV-uhn-sheer) - Originally from Devonshire County, England, it is a thick, buttery cream often used as a topping for desserts. It is still a specialty of Devon, Cornwall, and Somerset as this is where the right breed of cattle are raised with a high enough cream content to produce clotted cream. It is also known as Devon cream and clotted cream. Clotted cream has a consistency similar to soft butter. Before the days of pasturization, the milk from the cows was left to stand for several hours so that the cream would rise to the top. Then this cream was skimmed and put into big pans. The pans were then floated in trays of constantly boiling water in a process known as scalding. The cream would then become much thicker and develop a golden crust which is similar to butter. Today however, the cream is extracted by a separator which extracts the cream as it is pumped from the dairy to the holding tank. The separator is a type of centrifuge which extracts the surplus cream at the correct quantity so that the milk will still have enough cream to be classified as milk.
Dice: To "dice" means to cut food into cubes (the shape of dice in a game) which are more or less even. The dimension of the dice varies, with recipes calling for ingredients to be cut anywhere from 1/8-inch dice, to a 1/2-inch dice. "
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Tue May 03, 2005 12:43 am    Post subject: Re: *clears throat* Reply with quote

Amber wrote:
I recently found a wonderful recipe for Chocolate Delicious that you bake in little ramekins. The dessert is wonderfully flavoured and decadent, but only a thin layer of cake/pudding sits on top of a really large quantity of the sauce that forms, which is a little overwhelming. If I added more flour to the original recipe, might this make the cake layer thicker Question


Amber-

You got me, babe! Shocked The short version is how about trying again making sure that you begin the bain marie with boiling water or drop a line to bakers@kingarthurflour.com for more expert assistance.

The longer troubleshooting musing goes like this:

I tried to compare your recipe to one for a molten cake, one for a financier and also to one for a chocolate cheesecake (because of the bain marie step which is unusual for a cake). The Chocolate Delicious doesn't quite compare to them as both the molten cake and the cheesecake would be baked at a temperature that's significantly higher than yours. The cheesecake would bake as long but the molten cake would only be baked for a very short time. The financier would bake at a similar temp for a similiar time but, in my limited experience, wouldn't involve the bain marie.

The molten cake does have roughly the same proportion of eggs to flour to sugar. But it has a lot more butter. The cheesecake, of course, has either cottage, ricotta or cream cheese, which the Chocolate Delicious certainly does not. And none of them have any levening oher than the whipped egg whites. The financier does have chemical levening as well as the whipped egg whites, but it has a substantially higher proportion of fat. Still, I have to ask myself, "why the bain marie?"

The bain marie suggests something custardy that requires even, slow heat. The Chocolate Delicious appears to call for long, low heat. So, at this point I have only two things to suggest. 1) Did you start with boiling water as the recipe suggests? If not, the water may have taken so long to heat up that it never was able to transfer heat to the batter. Or 2) you could get more effective problem solving from the folks at King Arthur Flour. I'm guessing you don't want to give Vermont, USA a call from wherever you're baking in metric but you can always drop them a note at bakers@kingarthurflour.com. These folks are master bakers and wonderfully available to help.

I hope someone else has some ideas or you'll let me know what you find out because I'm really intrigued.
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