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Danish Butter
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aleniqu1



Joined: 27 Apr 2007
Posts: 15
Location: Greenville, NC, US

PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 2:27 pm    Post subject: Danish Butter Reply with quote

I was in a grocery store that sold some Danish butter. They were sold as the equivalent of a 1/2 cup and the sticks were about $4.00 each.
I try to buy organic dairy products as much as possible because they taste so much better. Were these Danish butter sticks so much more because they were imported or because of the quality? Or both?
I'm going to be doing a lot of baking in June and was thinking if I used that Danish butter I'd have to take out a loan to pay for all of the butter I would need. How would I explain that to the bank officer? You see, it becomes really, really fluffy when whipped...
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Richard Leader



Joined: 22 Feb 2006
Posts: 77
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 4:52 pm    Post subject: Re: Danish Butter Reply with quote

aleniqu1 wrote:
...How would I explain that to the bank officer? You see, it becomes really, really fluffy when whipped...

I've never whipped a bank officer... Wink

Does the butter taste good too?
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 6:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Richard Leader--Have you ever waited for one to rise? (And they always seem to want to proof the dough..

The butter Clotilde just wrote about (the ewe butter) is about $26 per pound, and you must provide your own salt! Butter flavor is so elusive. (Anybody remember the butter crisis in "Day for Night" ?) I love the idea of avant-beurre though! The cheese called Saint Andre ( I think) is sort of an avant-fromage, same idea.
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aleniqu1



Joined: 27 Apr 2007
Posts: 15
Location: Greenville, NC, US

PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2007 1:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Does the butter taste good? I don't know. I haven't purchased any. My first thought was gajeeberz, that's expensive. And I wasn't sure if it would be worth it.
If it really could be that yummy, then it's off to the bank I go.
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2007 2:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

aleniqu1, you should read the latest post in this Chocolate & Zucchini blog, "Beurre de Brebis" from May 1st, 2007.

Also, a good butter tasting discussion is here: http://www.doriegreenspan.com/dorie_greenspan/2007/04/better_butter_a.html

These 2 might help you, but of course we won't know what that $$$ butter tastes like 'til we taste it! I know I'll cave in, sooner or later.
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georgia



Joined: 16 May 2006
Posts: 456
Location: california

PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2007 2:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well...my dilemma is more complicated...I think I'm in love with Richard...never could resist a sassy man...oh well...

On to the butter issue...you've got several qualities to evaluate in butter to determine how it will perform in baking: taste, freshness, fat content, and water content. All of these will affect the finished product, and cost is not necessarily a determining factor for performance. Some butters that are fabulous for slathering on your fresh-baked bread fall flat (literally) when you bake with them. If you just want to experiment with the expensive Danish butter, I'd choose one recipe that you know well and have made numerous times. Make it with one or two different kinds of butter, including the Danish. See what works best for you.

A well known and highly regarded baker I met a while back (you'd probably recognize her name) said she usually uses Land O Lakes because, as she travels all over the US to teach, she knows she can get that butter everywhere, that it's of consistently high quality, and it has such a high turnover, she knows it's fresh. Those are her criteria.

There is an interesting and informative comparative article in the "San Francisco Chronicle" that might be of help to you. Unfortunately, I can't get the url for it, but try this:

1. Go to www.sfgate.com.
2. Click on "food and dining"
3. Look carefully for small print that indicates a series entitled "Tasters Choice". Click that.
4. When you get to that column, Search "all archives", then "butter". I think you'll find it.

Sorry I can't do that more efficiently, but it's worth seeking it out. Good luck.
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msue



Joined: 18 Dec 2005
Posts: 368

PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2007 2:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

georgia, I'm not sure if this is the link from sfgate you meant, or even if it will work here, but here is one article I found:

http://www.sfgate.com./cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2006/07/19/FDGACK09M11.DTL&hw=butter&sn=007&sc=403

And an article that specifically mentions a Danish butter:

http://www.sfgate.com./cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2006/12/13/FDGASMT5PD1.DTL&hw=butter&sn=005&sc=1000

To access those links, I had to follow georgia's directions in her previous post, but after typing in "butter" to the final page, it was necessary to select "Full Archive" to find all the sfgate articles on butter.

By the way, georgia, GREAT links!
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georgia



Joined: 16 May 2006
Posts: 456
Location: california

PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2007 3:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the addendum, msue. The second link ("Bake-a-thon"...) was the one I was specifically referring to, but the first is helpful as well. Once again, thanks for helping to clarify (no pun intended...ghee, that's silly!).

(I cannot tell you how proud I am of myself. I can't usually come up with a pun to save my life Laughing Laughing Laughing )
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Richard Leader



Joined: 22 Feb 2006
Posts: 77
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2007 5:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

georgia wrote:
I think I'm in love with Richard

Glad someone is.

Sad
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2007 5:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Clever Georgia-- a pat on the back!
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clotilde
Site Admin


Joined: 24 Sep 2004
Posts: 443
Location: Paris, France

PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2007 8:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good butter can be a superb treat, and if I were you I would buy a stick to taste it, for the sake of research. But at that price, I wouldn't bake with it -- I would keep it for spreading on good bread.

One thing you should pay attention to, since the butter is coming from afar, is how long it has taken to reach the shelves of your store. Perhaps there's a production date on the wrapper? If it's too old, it may turn rancid before you have a chance to use it up...
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georgia



Joined: 16 May 2006
Posts: 456
Location: california

PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2007 11:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

gingerpale...now that i'm on a roll Wink , i guess i'll just keep churning them out Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes

fini. i promise.
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aleniqu1



Joined: 27 Apr 2007
Posts: 15
Location: Greenville, NC, US

PostPosted: Fri May 04, 2007 3:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

First off, a correction is needed. It is 8 ounces for $3.99.

I went on a field trip tonight after work and I purchased a stick (of course) and had some this evening. It was lovely. It's the best butter I've had since moving to North Carolina from Oregon. (Oh, how I miss Tillamook dairy products.)

Other info:
* It is is Lurpak butter slightly salted;
* Its expiration date is 01-21-08. I looked at the sticks at the back of the shelf and they had the same date;
* I compared some other butters (Horizon organic, the store brand, Land O'Lakes) and their expirations dates ranged from 08-02-07 to 09-07-07. The prices ranged from $2.55 to $5.19 for 16 ounces.
* It is the Danish butter in that article from SFGate. That article was great and thank you to Georgia for the links. They are fantastic.
* According to the Lurpak website--"Contrary to most butter LURPAK butter is made from cultured cream."
* When I told somebody I bought it, she questioned me on the purchase. I told her Clotilde said I should for research purposes.
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msue



Joined: 18 Dec 2005
Posts: 368

PostPosted: Fri May 04, 2007 4:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another butter worth a try might be one by Vermont Butter & Cheese Company. An 8 oz. "stick" costs $4.29 here. The wrapper says that they culture their cream prior to churning (how else is it produced?). The unsalted version that I purchased is 12 grams of fat per serving (1 tbsp - 14g). I thought about using it to try the kouign-amann discussed on another thread, but now think that we will use this one for toast or bread rather than baking.

But first I have to explain to my very attentive dog why, at 10:30pm, I am walking around the house with a stick of butter!
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Fri May 04, 2007 5:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

msue--just to be clear, is it an 8 oz. or a 4 oz. stick?
I want to try the Kouign-Amann too--after this thread I'll be very obsessed about the butter. I'm not sure if I'd want a cultured "tang" in a caramelly-flavored pastry or not. I've used plain (not cultured) butter to make those salted caramels and they were great. I wish trying both types of butter in 2 side-by-side kouign-amanns was not impractical! I must leave that to the food bloggers.

georgia--yes, it's time to chill, you don't wanna spread yourself too thin.

Do they still make butter paddles?? The kind with little ridges to make decorative butter balls?
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