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Ratatouille
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2007 7:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Simona, I did find that post interesting (I think this is a more direct link,

http://www.amateurgourmet.com/the_amateur_gourmet/2007/07/ratatouille-is-.html (SPOILERS are in this article!)

I wonder if Adam (from amateurgourmet) is not the only one who saw Semitic implications in this.. if it was intended by Pixar people. The comments were heartfelt, too.
...


While in Israel, I had eggplant salad (not ratatouille) that was heaven. It took me weeks to try it because it was...grey...but oh I wish I had some now! I think it was Imam ba.... something....a delicious chilled dish.
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Barbara



Joined: 13 Nov 2004
Posts: 899
Location: Gold Coast Australia

PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2007 2:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gosh that was interesting. I was expecting an entertaining movie about a rat wanting to be a chef.
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2007 5:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

simona wrote:
I've never encountered a ratatouille composed from layers of eggplants, zucchini and tomato. But then on the other hand, this is a movie, not real food, so why not..


That's actually how I learned to make it when I was living in France. Not in the South were ratatouille originated but in the north in the countryside outside of Paris.
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minty



Joined: 17 Jul 2006
Posts: 140

PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2007 5:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very interesting link - especially as I've just finished a thesis on , in short, teenage litterature and WWII, which of course means loads of books on the Holocaust.

As for the movie, it won't be release in France until the beginning of August, so I'll have to wait and see the famous dish , but a ratatouille is NOT a layered dish , it's basically a mix of eggplants, zucchinis, tomatoes and onions with various seasonings like herbs... the vegetables are either diced or cut into pieces...

The layered Provençal dish based on eggplants, zucchini and tomatoes is called a TIAN ... Wink
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2007 7:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

minty- Could you share a recipe for a tian so we can see the difference?

NOT proposing that I am the one who knows the "right" way to make ratatouille. Actually, I make it three different ways 'cause I love it so much and each different version has it's own charms. But the first method I learned (from une jeune parisienne) was layering it — firmest things like onions & peppers at the bottom; tenderest like tomatoes, garlic & herbs at the top; zucchini & eggplant in the middle — in a stew pot and letting it cook long and slow while the veggies rendered their luscious juices into the complex flavor of sun and summer. By the time it's done and stirred, it's a stew. Not wanting to put too fine a point on it but layering and achieving a stew are not mutually exclusive.

Of course, I haven't seen the movie so I don't know how they layer and present ratatouille. I also don't know how on the mark The Amateur Gourmet is but I haven't enjoyed his blog for quite a long while.
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simona



Joined: 11 Mar 2005
Posts: 696
Location: israel

PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2007 11:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you minty for mentioning that the layered dish is a Tian. I was going to write about its, because I love the Tian very much, while I really don't like the ratatouille, which is of course a dish of coarsely cut vegetables , sauteed and then cooked together. Why would someone nicely arrange sliced vegetables and then stir them and stew them? The Tian, as far as I remeber, is baked in the oven, it's not mushy , and each vegetable retains it's distinctive taste and looks.
Ratatouille is the Provencal version of the Turkish/bulgarian/romanian ( in short- balkan) Giuveci ( Sp?).
Minty, I would like very much to hear more about your thesis, it seems a very interesting and important subject.
The Amateur Gourmet's interpreations of the movie ,- it's ususally a very funny and outspoken blog, full of youthful "hutzpe" - is certainly very personal. There is a lot to be commented about, but this forum is inadequate to host this kind of discussions.
Until the ultimate recipe of Ratatouille will be revealed to humanity,

No more war, no more hatred
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simona



Joined: 11 Mar 2005
Posts: 696
Location: israel

PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2007 12:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

P.S. Gingerpale, I think I know what you're talking about, it's called Imam Bayaldi and it's actually a turkish dish, and its a, actually kind of a stuffed eggplant.( the legend says the Imam fainted of happiness when eating this dish) But there are lots of eggplant salad dishes , very popular in Israel, which I'm sure you've also encountered in the verious restaurants: romanian style, greek style, with tahini, fried with "labaneh" cheese, sauteed with tomatoes and spices, etc etc etc.
Hope you'll be back in Israel sometimes and we'll have an orgy of egglant dishes..

No more war, more eggplant salads
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minty



Joined: 17 Jul 2006
Posts: 140

PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2007 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I found a nice picture and recipe of Tian at this address :

http://cannelleetcacao.typepad.com/mon_weblog/2006/07/tian_de_lgumes.html

this is a tian made with mediterranean vegs, but you can make tian with other vegs, that is, you can make one with potatoes, or with courgettes and goat's cheese etc ...
the LAYERED aspect is THE distinctive point !
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2007 8:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Merci, minty- Ça me fait faim! C'est vraiment beau. Il sera parfait pour l'éte et je crois qu'il sera tout facile aussi. Je suis heureuse d'apprendre de cette recette et ce blog.
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2007 9:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For anyone who wants help with that:

Tian de légumes
Recipe By: cannelleetcacao.typepad.com

Serving Size: 4


• 2 onions
• 2 cloves garlic
• 2 zucchini
• 1 eggplant
• 2 tomatoes
• 1 cup vegetable broth
• 3 tablespoon olive oil, plus a bit to top the arranged dish
• salt and freshly ground pepper

Préchauffer le four à 150°C (300˚F). Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F or 150 degrees C.

Laver les légumes. Wash the veggies.

Eplucher les courgettes une bande sur deux. Peel the zucchini, removing every other section of skin to leave surface striped.

Couper les légumes en ranche de 0,5 cm d'épaisseur. Cut the veggies in 1/4 inch slices.

Dans une poêle, faire chauffer 2 cuil. à soupe d'huile (pas plus) et y faire revenir les aubergines 1 minute sur chaque face. Heat 2 tbs. olive oil in a sauté pan. Don't use more than 2 tbs. Put in the eggplant and cook 1 minute on each side.

Peler les oignons et les couper en lamelles. Faire revenir dans 1 cuil. à soupe d'huile pendans 2 minutes avec l'ail émincé. Peel the onions and cut them into rings. Cook in 1 tbs of olive oil for 2 minutes with the garlic (I assume that's chopped garlic. maybe roughly chopped?).

Dans le fond d'un plat allant au four, mettre le mélange oignon et ail. Place the onions and garlic in the bottom of a baking dish.

Placer ensuite en rangées les aubergines, les courgettes et les tomates. Arrange the eggplant, zucchini and tomato slices alternating each.

Saler et poivrer. Arroser d'un filet d'huile d'olive et du bouillon.Mettre à cuire environ 1H15. (75 minutes) Season with salt & pepper and drizzle on a bit of olive oil and the bouillion. Place in the oven and roast for 1 1/4 hours.





Notes:



L'autre jour, mon amie Virginie m' appelle pour me demander la recette de mon tian de légumes, le meilleur selon elle car il ne dédèche pas même si on l'"oublie" un peu au four.

Mon secret? je verse un verre de bouillon de légumes dans le plat avant de l'enfouner.

J'aime beaucoup servir ce tian chaud ou à température ambiante en accompagement d'un barbecue.

Grâce à une cuisson douce et longue, les légumes sont presque confits, c'est un délice.

The other day my friend Virginie called and asked for the recipe for my veggie tian. She thinks it's the best because, according to her, it doesn't suffer if it gets left a little too long in the oven.

My secret? I pour a cup of veggie broth in the baking dish before I roast it.

I really like to serve this tian warm or at room temp at a barbeque.

Thanks to the long slow roasting, the veggies are practically a confit (cooked soft in their own juices). Yummy!



Don't you think if you skewered those rows of veggies on one of those rosemary sprigs like a skewer it would pick up additional flavor and look awfully stylish?!

simona- I didn't know about tians and I'm so glad you brought it up so I could learn about this wonderful alternative to ratatouille. I don't think I'm ever going to give ratatouille up, but I can't wait to try this too! Maybe even with the potatoes that minty suggested.
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georgia



Joined: 16 May 2006
Posts: 456
Location: california

PostPosted: Sat Jul 14, 2007 12:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you toss into your ratatouille (diced and stewed veggies, not tian-style) a (small) handful each of golden raisins, capers, pine nuts, and olives, you come up with a Sicilian version -- caponata -- which is equally fabulous. One might consider adding these ingredients to be gilding a perfectly fine lily, but it's a lovely variation from another sunny clime. Cool

And to pick up on another forum thread, doesn't ratatouille just shout out "Summer!" ?
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Sat Jul 14, 2007 4:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well I did the C & Z cookbook version of baked rat....... and it turned out beautifully. I used baby eggplants and very sweet peppers and vidlia onions so there was no bitterness at all. Baked it for at least 40 minutes more than the recipe called for to get a thickness that worked for me. Have used it as a pasta sauce and on toasted cheese! I also just eat it by the spoonful and let those sweet summer flavours burst in my mouth. Will do it againwhen we actually have good tomatoes to use!
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Sat Jul 14, 2007 5:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Phew! So many choices, but David you've distilled them--I remember now my original problem was bitterness (the vegetables, not my attitude!) Baby eggplants and sweet peppers and sweet onions, then begin. Back to basics!
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minty



Joined: 17 Jul 2006
Posts: 140

PostPosted: Sat Jul 14, 2007 6:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

thanks so much for the translation Rainey ! I should have done it- after all it Is my job, but I was too lazy... Wink
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2007 4:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Glad I could help gingerpale! I've finished eating my first batch now and hope to make it again within the next week or so. i really liked it, couldn't believe how sweet it was! Am thinking of tossing in some hot peppers some time just for a bit of zip!
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