Chocolate & Zucchini Forum Index >> Back to Chocolate & Zucchini <<

 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages 
 RSS feedLast posts feed   RegisterRegister   Log inLog in 

Stock
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Chocolate & Zucchini Forum Index -> Cooking & Eating
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
emilyj



Joined: 26 Jun 2006
Posts: 184
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 4:06 am    Post subject: Stock Reply with quote

Hi Everyone,

I am a bit embarassed to admit that I don't know how to make a decent meat or vegetable stock. Does anyone have any good recipes that they can share?

Thanks
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 8:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Honestly I just toss everything in a pot, brown and simmer. I use a standard mirepox, some sort of carcass and H2O.

Tell us how you make yours and we can help you with what's going wrong.
_________________
"It's watery....and yet there's a smack of ham."

"It's hot ham water."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Old Bay



Joined: 25 May 2006
Posts: 4
Location: Central Texas

PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 11:09 pm    Post subject: Re: Stock Reply with quote

emilyj wrote:
Hi Everyone,

I am a bit embarassed to admit that I don't know how to make a decent meat or vegetable stock. Does anyone have any good recipes that they can share?

Thanks


I like to get beef bones (for a beef broth) and roast for about 2 hours at 300. Don't let them burn. Then add to a pot of boiling water with carrots, onions (unpeeled for color) quartered, celery sticks, and a turnip halved. Deglaze the pan you roasted in and add liquid to pot. Cook about 4 hrs. Strain and reduce to desired strength. Do not salt until ready to use. Makes a rich beef stock.

For chicken stock just take some backs and thighs and boil with the same vegis--2 hrs--strain and reduce to desired strength--salt when you use it.
_________________
Cooking is Chemistry, Baking is Alchemy
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
emilyj



Joined: 26 Jun 2006
Posts: 184
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 5:15 am    Post subject: Thanks guys Reply with quote

Thanks for your help- my problem was that I wasn't sure what to put into the stock (apart from the meat of course Smile ). Your suggestions of carrots, onion and celery sound good. I don't know whether I will be able to find turnips though- I might have to skip that bit! or use something else.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Richard Leader



Joined: 22 Feb 2006
Posts: 77
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Wed Jul 26, 2006 1:18 pm    Post subject: Re: Thanks guys Reply with quote

Not so sure about turnip myself - I tend to avoid anything starchy in a stock as it often discolours. I usually throw in some peppercorns, a bay leaf, some fresh thyme and a few coriander seeds.

The key to my mind is to simmer very gently for a long time (2-3 hours for a mild stock, 8 hours for something you want to turn into a thick 'demi'). If you let the stock boil, you will end up with something more harsh and cloudy. Then strain as many times as you can be bothered - through muslin - to remove any impurities - then reduce down until it has the flavour you want - here you can add in wine (red or white, depending on the type of stock) or sherry, or masala or whatever!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Susan in Italy



Joined: 03 Apr 2006
Posts: 37
Location: Milan, Italy

PostPosted: Wed Jul 26, 2006 3:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Emily, Yep carrot, celery and onion are the key ingredients. If you want a few more choices, here's what Julia Child says to put in for basic meat stock: 2 peeled carrots, 2 peeled onions, 2 celery stalks, (optional 2 washed leeks) and in a cheesecloth bag, the following: ¼ tsp thyme, 1 bay leaf, 6 parsley sprigs, 2 unpeeled garlic cloves, 2 whole cloves. So that’s the “canonical” way but there’s an Italian saying “tutto fa brodo” which means, “everything makes broth” and I often deviate from this recipe in accordance with that I have available. Good luck! Oh, now I see that you’re in Adelade Australia (home of my great friend, Juliet Barker!) and THAT’S why you want to make stock. I’m sweltering at the moment here in ther Nothern hemisphere. Please enjoy the cool weather for me!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Judy



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 1196
Location: buried under a pile of books somewhere in Adelaide, South Australia

PostPosted: Wed Jul 26, 2006 7:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey emily

When are we getting together for coffee at CM?
_________________
Doing what you like is freedom
Liking what you do is happiness

www.cupcakerecipebook.com.au
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Deste



Joined: 17 Aug 2005
Posts: 307
Location: Far, far away

PostPosted: Wed Jul 26, 2006 9:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Emily:

I always used to save up carcasses from roasted chicken and then augment them with a little fresh meat if I felt there wasn't enough flavor. I just don't roast enough chickens these days. All recommendations here are great.

I will add that when there is a major sale, it's worth it to invest in a big, hefty stockpot so you can make a large batch and always have some in the freezer for a month or two. Then when there is another sale on really good chicken, make a new batch. For example, chicken legs were just on sale. I bought nearly 8 pounds of them, cut them in half to save the thighs for meals and used the drumsticks for stock.

Lately, I have been adapting a very explicit, purist recipe from Judy Rodgers in her Zuni Cafe cookbook and appreciate the clean taste. So here goes:

5 pounds of chicken legs and wings
Large sweet onion (12 oz.), peeled and quartered, then halved again
Medium carrot (4 oz., though I add more), peeled, 2-in. slices
Celery stalk, 2-inch slices
1 1/2 t coarse salt

Optional: if you buy leeks, don't discard the greens. Wash them thoroughly and freeze them to add to stockpot.

Wings really help the stock solidify when cold; I go back and forth between proportions of one to the other. Rodgers says buy a whole bird, but cut out the breast for your own use since it doesn't have as much flavor as the dark meat, but I find that free-range chicken parts are cheaper per pound than whole birds unless you have a really good Latino or Asian market whose poultry department you trust. (Organic's better since chickens that spend only the last weeks of their short lives can be called free-range. However, I don't splurge for stock.)

Wash and pierce the chicken to release flavor. Pile in pot and cover with around 4 quarts of cold water.

Bring water to a boil and skim off foam. This takes about 10 minutes of skimming. You may not get rid of all the foam; most of it will do.

Add vegetables & salt now. Once boil returns, reduce heat to a simmer.

I like to place a fine-mesh sieve with a handle over the pot to keep the chicken and most of the vegetables submerged. Whatever you do, don't put the lid over the pot.

Let it simmer for around 4 hours, unattended except for maybe making sure the flame's still lit and the surface is gurgling gently with a bubble here and there without petering out or boiling violently. Check to see if a mouse hasn't gotten too curious or a fire hasn't started because the wooden spoon was placed close to the burner.

DO NOT STIR. Do not even THINK about stirring. Look at the ceiling if you must and think of England, darling, think of England.

Around Hour 3 the smell should be making you hungry. Make toast. Hour 4: the odor should be virtually irresistible. Go ahead. You're not a nun. Taste. Actually, you could take little sips once and a while beforehand, but I find it's not really worth the effort.

At the fourth hour, the chicken flavor should be concentrated and just a little salty. Don't add any extra salt since you're going to be using this for different sorts of dishes, including stir-fries, soups, sauces. Wait until the stock is becoming something else to adjust seasoning.

Turn off heat & lift chicken parts and vegetable bits out of the stock with tongs. Some people like to nibble as they go, salt shaker and pepper grinder close at hand. Some feel the meat, at least, can be recycled in a pot pie, soup or casserole. Others say the hell with it, flavors been leached into the stock and they just dump the stuff, bit by bit into a colander and with a potato masher, press down to extract all the liquid.

When the pot's a manageable weight, lift and strain the stock through a fine-mesh (cleaned) strainer into a big bowl.

Let the stock cool to the point that it will not chemically alter plastic or shatter glass. Pour it into containers of various sizes, including ones that take no more than a cup. Seal and refrigerate overnight.

Next day, remove lids and skim off solid bright yellow fat from the surface of jiggly, wobbly stock. Write date on lids and put what you're not about to use in the freezer. You should have around 3 quarts of stock, maybe 3 1/2.

Offer to go grocery shopping with your friend and when she picks up the carton of Swanson's Organic Chicken Broth, you can brag that you don't buy it anymore because you make your own. Make sure this friend is either expendable or has a really, really good sense of humor and strong ego.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
georgia



Joined: 16 May 2006
Posts: 456
Location: california

PostPosted: Thu Jul 27, 2006 6:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

All of the stock guidelines sound fine to me. What made me laugh and laugh was Deste's advice to "think of England, darling, think of England"...takes a lady of a certain age (or a fan of Victoriana) to get that allusion...many thanks for the best laugh of my day!

P.S. I was taught to just let the stock "burp" every once in a while as it simmers...that's quite enough activity to accomplish what you want...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Richard Leader



Joined: 22 Feb 2006
Posts: 77
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2006 5:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The idea about freezing stuff for stock is a good one - here's what I currently have in my freezer for future stock:

1) A bag of prawn (shrimp) shells
2) A bag of the outer leaves of fennel bulbs
3) A bag of trimmings from asparagus

Previously, I've also had old bits of chicken and bags of fish bones, but my wife made me throw them out!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Deste



Joined: 17 Aug 2005
Posts: 307
Location: Far, far away

PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2006 8:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Richard Leader wrote:
The idea about freezing stuff for stock is a good one - here's what I currently have in my freezer for future stock:

1) A bag of prawn (shrimp) shells
2) A bag of the outer leaves of fennel bulbs

Previously, I've also had...bags of fish bones, but my wife made me throw them out!


I can't believe I never thought of #1 here when I have often been disappointed that I never have a stock for seafood in the house and don't think of calling the store first thing in the morning when they're trimming fish as I have been instructed to do the few times I've asked. Lobster shells are recommended too. (Are mussel shells worth saving?)

Yesterday I made a concentrated court bouillon* to poach a salmon fillet, adding fennel stalks to the white wine and water along with sliced carrots, red onion (it's just what I had, halved in the fridge) and a little salt. I saved the fennel fronds for garnish. The onion dyed the broth a light pink which was fine for salmon...good for trout, too. I froze some of the boullion for future use.

*James Peterson: 1 cup white wine to 2 quarts water, brought to boil and simmered 20 minutes. I used a ratio of about 1:2 of the two liquids, then poured out half to freeze and added ice cubes and a little more water to the pan so I wouldn't have to wait for it to cool before poaching.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
georgia



Joined: 16 May 2006
Posts: 456
Location: california

PostPosted: Tue Aug 01, 2006 5:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another good freezing idea is to freeze some stock in ice cube trays. After the stock has frozen, empty the trays and keep the stock cubes in a freezer bag. Perfect for those times when you need only a bit of stock to deglaze a pan, etc.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Donna



Joined: 14 Oct 2005
Posts: 827
Location: Oakland, CA

PostPosted: Tue Aug 01, 2006 9:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anthony Bourdain has a great chapter in the Les Halles Cookbook on stocks and demi-glaces. It makes it very easy!

I like to freeze stocks in zip-lock bags. I put the stock in, seal it and then place the bag in a 9x13 baking pan to freeze. When frozen, you can just stack them up in the freezer like bricks! I like to keep stock on hand, because I love homemade soup. You can put together a GREAT soup in under an hour and it will be very tasty by dinner time! Some soups you want to simmer and age for a day or so in the fridge, but some things, like minestrone are great the same day. Laughing
_________________
L'appetit vient en mangeant. -Rabelais
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
emilyj



Joined: 26 Jun 2006
Posts: 184
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Mon Aug 07, 2006 6:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I made a chicken stock with just the bones of the chicken with carrot, celery, onion, peppercorns and a couple of bay leaves and it turned out really well. Thanks everyone.

Richard Leader: thanks for your suggestions, I don't think I boiled mine for long enough (I didn't realise you needed to boil for 2-3 hours- wow)

Susan in Italy: thankyou very much, I would never have thought of putting all of those herbs and spices in! I will have to do that next time. Yes, it has been freezing here (although it's a lovely day today) so I have been on a bit of a soup craze lately- making my own stock has made it a heck of a lot cheaper (buying good packet stock is expensive in large quantities).

Oops Deste I put a lid on the pot but I PROMISE I didn't stir it Very Happy My friends are all hopeless frozen meal eaters but my mother was very impressed that I made soup stock rather than buying it from the supermarket.

Judy, I am at CM absolutely every weekend- usually on a Friday night but I can do Saturday morning if you are going then- just message me when you want to go and I'll meet you there. Smile

Georgia, that's a good idea about the icecubes, I will do that next time when I just need a little bit.

Donna: I tried the ziplock bags - Unfortunately I spooned it into the ziplock bags when it was a little bit too warm and they melted and leaked stock everywhere Embarassed great idea though!!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kitchensqueen



Joined: 20 Aug 2007
Posts: 34
Location: Chicago, IL USA

PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2007 2:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm learning to do my own stocks. I want to save veggie trimmings and meat bones in the freezer until I have a batch large enough to cook with. Will freezing everything alter the flavor or composition of the stock? And should I defrost everything before starting?
_________________
http://apartmentfarm.wordpress.com
http://historyinthemaking.wordpress.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Yahoo Messenger
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Chocolate & Zucchini Forum Index -> Cooking & Eating All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group