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Looking for Roseanne Raspberry plants.

 
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etwizard



Joined: 12 Mar 2005
Posts: 7
Location: Northern California

PostPosted: Sun Mar 20, 2005 9:27 am    Post subject: Looking for Roseanne Raspberry plants. Reply with quote

I'm on a mission. I'm looking for a very difficult cultivar of a red raspberry (difficult to propagate and to find). It seems that there is no commercial stock available . It is supposed to be the best tasting of all red raspberries. Friends and neighbors may have some in their gardens. Have any of you heard of such a planting?
Thanks for the help.
Solomon
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Dairy_Queen



Joined: 29 Jan 2005
Posts: 342
Location: Chicago and other places

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 9:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

etwizard: It's yet another miserable day in the Midwest, with rain, snow and hail covering the ground on Good Friday. So, armed with a bracing cuppa tea (Scottish Blend) and the laptop, I did an hour's worth of searching for your Roseanne raspberry bushes with ZERO SUCCESS. Sad

Even at websites that listed old, vintage varieties, there was no listing and nothing even close; except for an Anne raspberry with yellow berries.

Where in the world did you read about this? I'm curious because if it's an article written about them, maybe you can contact the author about them.

I'm enclosed two links for two sites that have a nice listings for berries, and the descriptions sound like what you desire in your Roseanne berry.

Good luck with this and please update us if you find out anything else.

http://www.noursefarms.com/

http://www.tytyga.com/raspberries/index.htm
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etwizard



Joined: 12 Mar 2005
Posts: 7
Location: Northern California

PostPosted: Sat Mar 26, 2005 2:55 am    Post subject: Still looking... Reply with quote

The real name of this berry is Rosanna. It is refered to in some sources as coming from the Adriatic... late fruiting. Doesn't seem to sucker, ergo lack of easy propagattion. More than that I don't know.
The weather in No. Cal. is SUNNY today. Maybe it will last. Spring at last, spring at last, thank God almighty, spring at last.
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McAuliflower



Joined: 07 Mar 2005
Posts: 3
Location: Eugene, Oregon

PostPosted: Sat Mar 26, 2005 8:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I found these posts online... sorry for the length, I'm pasting the whole enchilada. Perhaps you can contact these people:
________________________________________________________
Subject: Fullerton Arboretum "Green Scene" April 28, 29 Plant Sale
Date: Tue, 10 Apr 2001 09:53:13 -0700 (PDT)
From: Eunice Messner <eunicemessner@yahoo.com>


Probably the largest collection of garden vendors in California
will be at the "Green Scene" Fullerton Arboretum event April 28,
29, 2001. 9 to 4 on Saturday, 10 to 4 on Sunday. I believe
admission is $6 and children under 17 are free. Arboretum members
will have first choice on Friday evening (plus refreshments). You
can join at the gate for $25.

The Orange County Chapter of California Rare Fruit Growers will
offer a large selection of fruit trees. It varies every year but,
for sure, will be avocado trees that are best for the home garden
that are not sold commercially. We get the scion wood from the UC.
Field Station. There will also be a large selection of potted
deciduous trees from L.E. Cooke.

The best tasting of all red raspberries, "Rosanna" will be
available. All commercial sources have none left in stock. This
variety does very well in our subtropical areas as well as colder
ones. (Bill Nelson came and dug up some of mine so he would have
some parent stock.)

Lots of flowers, organic vegetable plants, succulents, garden
tools, macadamia nut crackers, etc. and of course, food. (I am
bringing 350 pepper plants, like the ones that are selling now for
$4.99 a #, - O.C. Organic Gardening booth.)

It is LOTS of fun! Plan to spend the day.

Eunice Messner mailto:eunicemessner@yahoo.com

P.S. I am also known as the "Hollyhock Lady" as I bring seed to
the O.C. Horticulture booth from my English fluted and/or frilled
hollyhocks unlike any others you have seen. The 300 packets I
bring usually sell out on Saturday.

>From the #57 Freeway, exit on Yorba Linda Blvd., turn west (left)
to the next street, Associated Rd., and turn left again. There
will be parking attendents to direct you.

________________________________________________________

* To: nafex <nafex@egroups.com>
* Subject: [nafex] Rosanna
* From: hector black <hblack@TWLakes.Net>
* Date: Wed, 06 Sep 2000 16:15:14 -0700
* Delivered-to: mailing list nafex@egroups.com
* List-unsubscribe: <mailto:nafex-unsubscribe@egroups.com>
* Mailing-list: list nafex@egroups.com; contact nafex-owner@egroups.com
* Reply-to: nafex@egroups.com


eGroups My Groups | nafex Main Page | Start a new group!

I believe Rosanna was developed in Italy. I've tried it here - flavor is extraordinary, but it is persnickety and never had much fruit over the 4 or 5 years I've tried. My one or two sprouts are already promised to a friend - if I find more and you are interested, let me know.
Hector black, zone 6

________________________________________________________

best of luck
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Dairy_Queen



Joined: 29 Jan 2005
Posts: 342
Location: Chicago and other places

PostPosted: Sat Mar 26, 2005 3:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great info, McAuliflower! Maybe I need to do some searches on Roseanna now, vs. Roseanne.

Persnickety plants I have little time for growing. I've done it with various basil species that never seemed to make it out of their Green E.R.
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etwizard



Joined: 12 Mar 2005
Posts: 7
Location: Northern California

PostPosted: Sat Mar 26, 2005 8:15 pm    Post subject: Nice reply, thanks Reply with quote

Thanks McAuliflower
I'm not sure what it is about Raspberries. When I study apples, I find reams and reams of history and research on varieties and crosses and everything about them. Berries, no such luck.
I was given a clump, five canes, a few weeks ago. I traded some of my Marionberry for some of her Rosanna. Its leafed out now. Very stout, ridged canes, similar to Heritage, not at all like Willemette. I have heard that its slow to never fruiting. I have heard that it is the best tasting Raspberry in the world. I have heard that it is a late producer and not a heavy producer. Most of all this is anecdotal. Most of my e-mail requests to growers, associations etc have drawn responses summerized by "can't find it, don't know".
My plant is just leafing out and is too early to show any flowers...So more to follow.
Still looking for that Raspberry tome... Where is it?
Thanks for helping.
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Debbie



Joined: 21 Feb 2005
Posts: 861
Location: Paris

PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2005 9:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good evening!

This is a wild stab in the dark, but I know the is a heritage fruit and veg company in Victoria in Australia. Cannot remember their name, but a place I worked at bought a whole heap of heritage fruit and veg plants to plant as a demonstration orchard and farm.

Maybe if you looked up specifying Victoria Australia you could find them? They may have info on the plants for you. I do know that they would have to have imported them at some stage from other countries as Australia does not have these types of fruit and veg as natural native species.

If I have a brainwave I will post name for you.

I am enjoying hearing about your gardens. At present I am in a tiny Parisienne apartment and miss my garden in Sydney where I grew all my herbs and a lot of our fruit and veg and flowers. Am thinking about window boxes and wondering if it is the right time for them here now?

Good luck!
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Judy



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 1196
Location: buried under a pile of books somewhere in Adelaide, South Australia

PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2005 11:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Debbie, I think the place you are thinking of is Diggers Seeds, at Heronswood, Victoria.

Perry's Fruit and Nut Nursery at McLaren Flat south of Adelaide, South Australia, might also be worth a try.

Good luck in your search, etwizard. I always liked growing Heritage Raspberries, which had a lovely crop in Autumn. It's too hot and dry here in Adelaide to grow them, unfortunately.
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etwizard



Joined: 12 Mar 2005
Posts: 7
Location: Northern California

PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2005 1:06 am    Post subject: Springtime Reply with quote

The search for the heritage of the Rossana Raspberry goes on. The Marionberries are now leafed out fully. Fruiting stems are going on about 7" tall. I grow my marionberries wrapped around hoops attached to the wine barrel they grow in. Its kind of a nice way to keep them contained. Its very pretty in the garden and very practical. The raspberries are in raised beds between horizontal wines. The upright plants are pretty easy to deal with, except for the suckers. You need to control them. The plants that tend to long limbs, like the Cumberland Black Caps, or for that matter the Wilemettes', end up tied on the top wires. It gets intense when the new canes join the fruiting canes and everyone needs to be or needs to stay tied up. Such troubles.
The Boysenberries and the Tayberries are about ten time worse. Don't come to that box with anything but long sleeves and leather gloves. These vines trained horizontal are a challenge to the flesh. Mine. They will absolutely give new credence to the legend of Brer Rabbit and Brer Fox. While there is no tar pit in this story, you could hide between the rows (if you were really small) and be quite safe for any but the true armor clad.
This being spring and all in No Calif. its also the season for slimey creepy slippery gooey world wreakers. The slub and the snail. We finally got a little sun this weekend and I did a little stroll to check things over. My table with all my grafted miniature trees was my first stop. Ah oh. Something was amiss. Little trails of slime. Damn...
I had grafted to some St Juliene A rootstock a variation on the Blenheim Apricot, and they had been munched. I had to find the criminals. No one hidding on the table. Wait, how about that littleslice between the table top and the pot bottom. You know, where the water drains out under a black plastic pot? Lifted them up and there they be. Little grey darts of slippery destruction. Well final destruction was mine. Cleared em out.
Unfortunately, one tree had all its swelling buds eaten clean off. Nothing but a slime trail on a brown stick. We'll have to see if she'll push a new bud out. If not, well, the rootstock will trow out a new bud and we'll do it again next year.
So much for trees and buds for now. More gardens later.
I still want to know about 'Rosanna'. If now of you find it...well I give you a report as the season moves along.
Keep the thumbs green.
Plant a garden...even on a wndowsill.
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Lady Amalthea



Joined: 18 Dec 2004
Posts: 136
Location: New York City

PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2005 8:58 am    Post subject: Re: Springtime Reply with quote

etwizard wrote:
Plant a garden...even on a wndowsill.


I'm also stuck in a gardenless Parisian apartment. Anyone have advice on what I can plant?
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Debbie



Joined: 21 Feb 2005
Posts: 861
Location: Paris

PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2005 11:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good morning!

Heronswood is one of the places where you can buy heritage plants in Vic, but the one I am thinking of is for commercial growers mainly. Still can't remember the name, but will email a friend from where I worked and see if they can go back through invoices to find the place. They do take small orders and are very helpful for enquiries.
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