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AUGUST '08 DISCUSSION: Recipe Deal Breakers
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Griffin



Joined: 09 Jun 2006
Posts: 932
Location: England

PostPosted: Tue Aug 12, 2008 3:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I've also recently walked away from a few that began "Begin with a whole, dressed pig..."


The idea of a whole pig dressed for dinner made my day!! The similar one for me is the apparent direction of Mrs Beeton 'First catch your hare...!' Mrs Beeton clearly was no Elmer Fudd!
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Judy



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
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Location: buried under a pile of books somewhere in Adelaide, South Australia

PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2008 3:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've recently done a bit of research on George Orwell's 'Animal Farm' and the thought of a whole, dressed pig conjured up some images for me, none of them food-related.
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Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
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Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2008 5:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That is one of the most disturbing books I have ever read.
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2008 8:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
That is one of the most disturbing books I have ever read.

Try "1984" by the same author!

But oops, this thread about recipe deal breakers is slipping off topic. Griffin's mention of Mrs. Beeton made me look at my copy of her (1000+ pages) "...Book of Household Management". I think simply having a kitchen in the 1850s would be a deal breaker! I've never plucked a chicken, or needed to make my own soap...
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KYHeirloomer



Joined: 21 Aug 2007
Posts: 552
Location: Central Kentucky

PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2008 1:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You kidding, Ginger? She had all sorts of high-tech help; like a "portable" stove. And even running water inside the house!

Try going back a hundred years earlier. In the 1750-1790 period the best we had in labor saving devices was a hearth crane and a mechnical spit. Thank the lord for kids to crank it---although the rich folks down the way had a treadmill arrangement that their dogs ran on.

You want to talk about deal breakers? The recipes (actually "reciepts") back then listed ingredients in amounts like "some," as in, take some flour and.... And the directions were really precise, such as, "cook til enough."
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Griffin



Joined: 09 Jun 2006
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Location: England

PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2008 11:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Try going back a hundred years earlier. In the 1750-1790 period


My copy of Hannah Glasse's Cooking made Plain and Simple (an 8th edition from 1763) has recipes that are made in a sealed jar and then immersed in hot horse poo!!! That would definitely be a deal breaker! Shocked

I agree with Ginger tho', 1984 is truly frightening. In the UK I can almost see this government preparing the way for it too, which is even scarier.
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KYHeirloomer



Joined: 21 Aug 2007
Posts: 552
Location: Central Kentucky

PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2008 12:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

They must have dropped those recipes later on, Griffin. My 1796 edition has nothing like that. Or I somehow managed to overlook them---which I kind of doubt. Not the sort of thing you're likely to forget.

Could you post one or two of those recipes? In the 40 or so cookbooks and cookery manuscripts from the period that I've read, dating from the 1600s to the early 1800s, I've not seen reference to that technique anywhere. It would be interesting to see how it was done.
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Griffin



Joined: 09 Jun 2006
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Location: England

PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2008 5:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

KYH,

I'll have to look for the book. It was wrapped in acid-free tissue and boxed with a few others. But if I can get hold of it, then I will put one or two of those 'receipts' up here.
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2008 5:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The only thing I can think of that would use that unusual method is something like yogurt--it's made by keeping it warm, not hot, for hours.

How easy, concise, and super-assisted our cooking is now! The most exotic techniques from every & anywhere are on YouTube, usually conveniently in English no matter the nationality of the presenter.
(And we have 'deal breaker' forums to identify and complain about the recipes we still think are too difficult!)

I wonder, if I were simply told to take "some flour", how much flour I would take Laughing (How quickly you'd learn, doing stuff this way!)
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Barbara



Joined: 13 Nov 2004
Posts: 899
Location: Gold Coast Australia

PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2008 9:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Reading a Moroccon cookbook last night I've come across a new deal breaker for me. "Mastic" Any suggestions for a replacement?
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Barbara
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renoles



Joined: 11 Jan 2008
Posts: 10
Location: New Orleans, LA

PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2008 10:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't know about replacement but several of my local International markets stock edible mastic - or edible gum. Looks like gummy rock candy/rock salt. I was also reading somewhere recently to use sparingly or it'll give an off flavor. Maybe a local market that specializes in Indian cuisine could help?
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manatree



Joined: 15 Aug 2008
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Fri Aug 15, 2008 7:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i agree with the deep frying, it's a catch 22, i don't want to do it much for health reasons, and now I don't do it often enough that the oil goes to waste. i save my deep frying cravings for a rare treat, whilst out at a restaurant.

however, my main deal breaker is anything involving flambé. bananas foster is one of my all time favorite treats, however, i'm rather fond of my apartment, which has wood cabinets, not stainless steel
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Fri Aug 15, 2008 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you, Barbara-- your question provided me with yet another C&Z mini-education.
http://www.theepicentre.com/Spices/mastic.html
This stuff has some wide-spread applications!

The flavor is described as mild pine or cedar. So, for a possible 'sub'-- pine nuts have that light pine taste--are pine nuts ever used in Moroccan cooking?
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Claudia



Joined: 01 Aug 2008
Posts: 5
Location: White Bear Lake, MN USA

PostPosted: Mon Aug 18, 2008 10:53 pm    Post subject: Eggplant Success Reply with quote

"Start with a dressed whole pig." Oh my. I would want to adopt it (very hyopcritical of me - I do eat bacon). Realized I also don't tend to do anything in aspic. It's not a pet peeve - I just seem to skip over those recipes.

But today, did some caponata that was hugely successful. I have always turned eggplant into mush. No matter what I did - it became porridge. But today, I properly salted it, let it drain and then adapted a recipe - and it is delicious - a touch of sweet, a lot of savory and nothing cooked into oblivion. So, my accomplishment for July - is truly delicious caponata!
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Barbara



Joined: 13 Nov 2004
Posts: 899
Location: Gold Coast Australia

PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2008 12:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you Renoles. Seems it is used for its flavour then and not how it reacts with other ingredients.
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Barbara
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