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Sure sign of Summer: Dreaming of Pesto!
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Lady Amalthea



Joined: 18 Dec 2004
Posts: 136
Location: New York City

PostPosted: Wed May 18, 2005 9:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

DQ, That sounds soo amazing! I must run out and find some sage. Although I still have no food processor. Hmph.
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Dairy_Queen



Joined: 29 Jan 2005
Posts: 342
Location: Chicago and other places

PostPosted: Wed May 18, 2005 4:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lady: How long are you staying in Paris? Regarding the food processor: in AmericaLand, they sell small units by Black and Decker for under $12.00 that can handle a cup of material. It might mean that you process pesto in two batches, but you'd at least have it made.

In the larger department stores in Paris, there has to be some small affordable processor that will ease up your kitchen duties but not dent your wallet.

Summer is coming! You must eat fresh PESTO!!!
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eileen



Joined: 27 Apr 2005
Posts: 67
Location: antwerp, belgium

PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2005 4:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

justme - here is recipe for deep-fried sage. enjoy!

* Exported from MasterCook *

DEEP-FRIED SAGE LEAVES

Recipe By :
Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Appetizers Seasonings

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
36 Whole sage leaves
-- washed and dried
Hot oil for deep frying
-- to depth of 1 inch
-----BATTER-----
1 c Lager beer
2/3 c All-purpose flour
Salt & pepper -- to taste
1 Egg white -- at room temp.

Select whole, unblemished sage leaves with stems left
on, for easy handling.

Combine beer, flour, salt and pepper in small bowl
until smooth. Batter should have the consistency of
cream soup. Let stand at room temperature at least 15
minutes.

Meanwhile, beat the egg white until it is fairly stiff
but not dry. Fold into batter. Dip whole sage leaves
in batter to coat both sides.

Deep-fry in hot oil or shortening until crisp and
golden brown on both sides. Drain on paper towels;
serve.

Yield: 4 to 6 servings.
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2005 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I remember seeing deep fried herbs on the Food Network and thinking, "OK. Now that's entirely too precious!". Then I got a deep fryer and had hot oil when I was finished making doughnuts so I put in a handful of green herbs. Guess what? It's an entirely different animal and quite a hot one at that!

So, now, I never pull the fryer out without dipping whatever herbs I have on hand. I don't batter them. I like to see and taste the "green" which is, remarkably intact with the flavors concentrated and enhanced by a decided crunch factor.

But battering reminds me of a garnish my son and I had at a Japanese restaurant in Vancouver. They took a small bundle of uncooked/semi-cooked noodles and fused the bottoms somehow (maybe they dipped them in hot water momentarily to soften the outside and then squeezed the handful together). Then they dipped the tops in a tempura batter and "flung" them in some way (I think these were more cooked/softened) so as to spread the tips by a centrifugal action and diffuse the batter. Then they were plunged into hot oil momentarily. The effect was lovely -- something vaguely like the skeleton of a dried maple leaf.
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eileen



Joined: 27 Apr 2005
Posts: 67
Location: antwerp, belgium

PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2005 7:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mmmmm, rainey, homemade doughnuts! what a t-r-e-a-t. i am swooning - just when i thought i was outgrowing my sweet tooth. Very Happy
here in belgium, some kitchens come with a built-in deep-fryer. they love their frites (misnamed 'french'-fries in america).
another thing i've had here, which sounds just like what you're doing: deep-fried parsley (no batter) as a garnish. yum.
being married to a scot, i have had the, um, pleasure of going to the local fish-n-chipper in scotland. EVERYTHING is put into the deep-frier. have you heard of deep-fried mars bars? i haven't tried them yet, it's too scary. but the last time we were there we had: pasta takeaway which came with chips (fries); chinese takeaway with curried chips; pizza with chips; and.....macaroni & cheese, with the side vegetable? you guessed it: chips. (and here, upon hearing this list, the hubbie starts to swoon)
one could hear the arteries hardening....
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JustMe



Joined: 13 Apr 2005
Posts: 213
Location: Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2005 8:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Eileen: thanks ever so much for the recipe. Can't wait to try it.
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mary g



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 20
Location: Cleveland, Ohio, USA

PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2005 4:49 pm    Post subject: more pesto Reply with quote

I make pesto every year from the garden, and freeze it--how great it is to pull one of these out in January and have the taste of summer. I use the standard recipe, but I like to vary it sometimes. I've used all kinds of nuts, and especially liked almonds and pistachios as substitutes for pine nuts. I also sometimes add a little piece of a fresh cayenne pepper, for a hotter pesto.
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Katrina



Joined: 19 May 2005
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2005 7:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DQ: Thanks for the great recipe with the figs! Can't wait to make it.
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Dairy_Queen



Joined: 29 Jan 2005
Posts: 342
Location: Chicago and other places

PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2005 8:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Katrina wrote:
DQ: Thanks for the great recipe with the figs! Can't wait to make it.


No problemo, Katrina! I like the Support Group that we all have going HERE to help each other out.

mary g wrote:


I make pesto every year from the garden, and freeze it--how great it is to pull one of these out in January and have the taste of summer.


mary g: I've always been terrified of freezing pesto, because I've heard that it turns black when frozen. Do you put ALL of the ingredients in there or do you leave the cheese out until it thaws? Do you cover it with an extra layer of olive oil? I'd love to take advantage of my basil harvest and freeze some, so your help would be appreciated!
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brighidsdaughter



Joined: 02 Oct 2004
Posts: 233
Location: Canton, TX USA

PostPosted: Fri Jul 08, 2005 12:32 pm    Post subject: freezing pesto Reply with quote

Several years ago a friend offered to bring me some basil from his garden, which turned out to be a bush at least 3 ft tall & 3 ft diameter, stuffed into a big black trashbag. I had to make all the pesto the same day. I had about a gallon of packed leaves, but couldn't afford the required amount of olive oil or other ingredients just then.

I made pesto using all the basil, garlic & salt, but 1/2 the amount of olive oil so it was very thick. After freezing in ice cube trays, I dumped the pesto-concentrate cubes into a freezer bag. No problems with it turning black. My pesto recipe includes a bit of lemon juice, so that may have kept the mixture from oxidizing. Additional oil, pine nuts, and parmesan were added as needed when I thawed out a few cubes. The cubes, as they were, proved to be ideal for adding to a pot of soup, especially in the winter.
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Fri Jul 08, 2005 4:52 pm    Post subject: Re: freezing pesto Reply with quote

brighidsdaughter wrote:
The cubes, as they were, proved to be ideal for adding to a pot of soup, especially in the winter.


Mmmmm! I'll bet! Wink
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Wine and Figs



Joined: 27 Apr 2005
Posts: 10
Location: Napa Valley, California, USA

PostPosted: Mon Jul 25, 2005 5:01 pm    Post subject: Additional Summer Musings on Pesto - CILANTRO! Reply with quote

Here's another good idea for those of you that find that occaisionally your local markets will have tons and tons of something at a very low cost. (See my post on Jalepenos)

Fresh cilantro (or coriander) is now in season. I can't help but buy bunches and bunches and put them in everything I make. However, I always find myself with some rotton leaves at the end of the week. So... I make cilantro "pesto."

My receipe is no great invention, I'm just using it so that I never care if a bunch of cilantro goes bad. Technically, I don't really think that I can call it pesto, because I don't add all the other traditional ingredients. But... I'll always have my "pesto" to replace those black smelly rotten leaves that I find in the rear of my fridge.

Cilantro "Pesto"

Take as much cilantro as you want
Swirl in food processor
Add some (really - just a little) olive oil - nothing fancy - not "EVOO"
Salt and Pepper is completely optional
Put in jar
Put jar in refrig

Enjoy. Mine last for weeks. I'm crossing my fingers that it will last for weeks and maybe months when the abundant supply of cilantro ends.

Thanks, everyone for all the great posts. I'm going to try the Sage Pesto later this week. I've been looking for something to do with my overgrown sage plant, so this is perfect.
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