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For my freezer--and table and stomach!
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Tue Feb 09, 2010 6:22 pm    Post subject: For my freezer--and table and stomach! Reply with quote

For literally years, we've been avoiding pork at my house because of no convenient affordable access to guaranteed humanely raised meat. But hurray! I've found a source, and am buying 1/4 or 1/2 pig soon for my freezer. (On waiting list 'til April.)
So--if anyone has a favorite--I'd love to become aware of it.
Here at C&Z, Clotilde lists several--the cider-stewed and the roasted with apples caught my eye right away.
In the forum recipes, Rainey posted a Mexican (?) pork and tomatillo stew and Gretchen posted Carolina pulled pork. There's a chile recipe that uses some pork, and David's Maple Beans needs pork too.

I will have a nice variety, roasts and ribs and bacon, ham, and sausage.
Thanks very much!
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KYHeirloomer



Joined: 21 Aug 2007
Posts: 552
Location: Central Kentucky

PostPosted: Tue Feb 09, 2010 6:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ginger, are you up to curing your own ham and/or bacon?

If so, I can walk you through the process.
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Wed Feb 10, 2010 2:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The farmer I am buying from has told me his butcher will do the curing if I like, so the ham and bacon will come cured already.
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KYHeirloomer



Joined: 21 Aug 2007
Posts: 552
Location: Central Kentucky

PostPosted: Wed Feb 10, 2010 5:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So, just to be on the same track. With a half hog, and excluding the ham and belly, you should be recieving:

Half the ribs, which should resemble St. Louis style slab.
One rack, which you can use as is, cut it into chops, or debone the loin.
1 tenderloin
1 complete shoulder

Then, depending on the processor, you may or may not get half the neck, and one jowl. Odds are you'll get neither of these cuts. If you can specify that you want them, best uses, IMO, are to have the jowl cured as bacon, and the neck either ground or cut into stew meat.

I'd also ask him to separate the shoulder into it's two pieces, cuz they're easier to wrap and freeze that way.

Check with the farmer to see if this is, indeed, what you should expect. Once we know we can start talking about actual recipes.
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georgia



Joined: 16 May 2006
Posts: 456
Location: california

PostPosted: Wed Feb 10, 2010 11:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

While we're on this piggy-butchering thread, I'd like to recommend some TV viewing that might interest some of you. (This may just apply to US viewers...maybe Canada...also, a possibility that I haven't checked -- YouTube ?)

If you're familiar with the Travel Station program "No Reservations" with Anthony Bourdain, I urge you to seek out the episode in Prague. He and his crew are invited to a rural autumn pig butchering/cooking ritual, and it's fascinating to see the skill and old school traditions. Amazing.

I'm sorry I can't provide any link, but you can look for it on your television schedule. Also, if you have cable TV "On Demand", you may find it under "TV Series"/"No Reservations"/Prague.

Meanwhile, gingerpale, I'm thinking about my favorite pork recipes and will post them if any seem worthy Smile
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 5:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh a Prague piggy! Actually, I found a pic from that show (which I have not seen)
http://www.travelchannel.com/TV_Shows/Anthony_Bourdain/Photos/Slideshow_Prague_Behind_The_Scenes?s=2 The pig looks quite tidy, and I notice the butcher doesn't wear white!
There is also a YouTube of Bourdain at the French Laundry Restaurant--ooh la la.

KYH I don't need any special cuts, I was just asking in case someone has a recipe for (any kind of) pork they feel is especially good.
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sweetbabyjames



Joined: 05 May 2006
Posts: 357

PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 5:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't eat it myself, but I've helped in the smoking of pig many times. It's a long, fun process (fun, I guess, only if you like long processes) and the meat always gets raves. Gingerpale, I have an appointment this weekend at our local (Chinatown) pig & duck smoker to take some pictures. Perhaps I'll have to share them here.
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 7:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

swb, that would be really cool!
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 8:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, sweetbabyjames, I remember your ex-blog featured "biskits" and vegetarian sausage gravy, and how I was puzzled by that.

We have a small smoker, to make jerky from some of Rich's elk/deer.
Can't imagine why pork chops, bacon, etc. couldn't be done too..
I've been looking so much at sweet (apples, brown sugar & mustard, apricots! cherries! raisins!) recipes I never thought of smoked stuff--whole new page. I also like pork in Chinese food, (booksful right there) *and* am wondering if it would be possible to make some kind of bastardo prosciutto-type condiment thin-sliced ham with an American Berkshire pig?
And yes, I'd love to see here or at your blog pictures of doings in Chinatown in Boston.
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KYHeirloomer



Joined: 21 Aug 2007
Posts: 552
Location: Central Kentucky

PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 9:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

if it would be possible to make some kind of bastardo prosciutto-type condiment thin-sliced ham with an American Berkshire pig?

Possible? Absolutely. But not if you're getting the ham already cured, as you indicated.

Prosciutto, and it's related products like Serrano and Speck, are cured, but not smoked, hams. What makes them different is the manner of curing and aging.

Meanwhile, here's a recipe that seems to meet all your hopes. Although it calles for a pork tenderloin, I've often made it by splitting a loin lengthwise as well. Slightly different texture, but the flavor is just as good.

The original comes from Kate Heyhoe's marvelous little book, Great Bar Food At Home:

Char Shu slices with Mahogany Marmalade and Hot Mustard

1 pork tenderloin (1 to 1 1/4 lbs)
1/2 cup soy sauce
3 tbls molassas
2 tbls hoisin
2 tbl triple sec or dry sherry (optional)
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 finely chopped scallions (green and white parts)
1-inch piece fresh ginger, minced
1 tbls toasted sesame oil
Hot Mustard for serving (which see below)

Cut the tenderloin into two equal, short, plump pieces for easier handling and quicker cooking. In a shallow baking dish or a resealable plastic bag, combine the soy sauce, molasses, hoisin, triple sec, garlic, scallion, ginger, and sesame oil. Mix well to dissovle the hoisin and molasses. Add the pork and coat completely. Marinate, refrigerated, for 2 hours to overnight, turning the pork occasionall in the marinade.

Preheat the broiler. While it heats, line a baking sheet with hnonstick foil, or spritz regular foil with nonstick spray.

Place the pork on the foil-lined baking sheet. Pour the marinade into a saucepan, bring it to a boil over medium-high heat, and boil, stirring often, until it reduces to a very thick, syrupy glaze. When it cools slightly the sauce will resemble a marmalade, dense and sweet with bits of scallion, garlic, and ginger.

Broil the pork for five to seven minutes, until the top side takes on color and starts to look cooked. Turn the pieces over and broil another five minutes. Spoon some of the thickened sauce over the pork, coating the top and all sides. Broil for another three to six minutes, until the glaze caramelize and turns a deep mahogany color and the pork is just cooked through.

Let the pork rets at least ten minutes before slicing. To serve, slice the pork at an angle and overlap the slices on a plate. Accompany with a small dish of the reduced marmalade, a small dish of hot mustard, and soy sauce.


Hot Mustard

Mix together 2 teaspoons each dry mustard and water until smooth. Let the mixture rest ten to 30 minutes before serving.

I actually prefer a different mustard, but it takes longer to prepare:

Chinese-Style Mustard Sauce

1/4 cup sugar
2 tbls Colman's mustard powder
1 large egg yolk
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
6 tbls creme fraiche or sour cream

Combine the sugar and mustard powder in the top of a double boiler and mix with a whisk. When well combined, whisk in the egg yolk and vinegar. Cook over simmering water, stirring occasionally, 10-15 minutes, until the mixture is thick enough to form ribbons when drizzled from the spoon. Remove from the heat and let cool. When cool, stir in the creme fraiche. Refrigerate until needed.
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KYHeirloomer



Joined: 21 Aug 2007
Posts: 552
Location: Central Kentucky

PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 9:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Braised Pork with Coriander

6 center-cut loin chops (or equivalent from the loin)
1/4 cup butter
1 lb new potatoes, peeled
1/2 lb small mushrooms
1 cup red wine
Salt & pepper to taste
2 tsp coriander seeds, toasted and crushed

Cut pork into cubes, leaving some fat on meat.

Heat half the butter in a deep skillet. Brown the potatoes. Remove and keep aside.

Add remaining butter and brown pork on each side. Push to side of pan. Quickly fry mushrooms, and stir to combine with the meat. Reduce heat to low.

Pour in wine. Add salt & pepper to taste and place potatoes on top in a single layer. Sprinkle with coriander seeds, cover pan, and simmer over low heat about 45 minutes or until pork and potatoes are tender.
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KYHeirloomer



Joined: 21 Aug 2007
Posts: 552
Location: Central Kentucky

PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 9:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hazelnut-Crusted Pork Chops

3/4 cup toasted, ground hazelnuts
1/3 cup fine breadcrumbs
1/2 tsp dried tarragon
1/4 tsp dried thyme
1/2 tsp sea salt
1/2 tsp white pepper
6 thick boneless chops
6 plumb garlic cloves
1 onion
3/4 tsp dried sage leaves
1/2 cup Dijon mustard
2 tbls white wine

Combine nuts, crumbs, tarragon, thyme, salt and pepper in a flat bowl or sheet pan.

Cut pockets into chops, almost tothe point of butterflying them.

Finely mince together the garlic, onions and sage to form a paste. Divide into six portions and spread each portion inside the pockets.

Mix mustaard and wine. Coat chops with the mustard mix and press into the nut mixture to coat thoroughly. Place in a single layer in a buttered pan.

Bake at 350F for 45 minutes, turning once.
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Snowy Owl



Joined: 04 Jan 2010
Posts: 21
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 10:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

OK - there will be alot of copy pasting these recipes to my files ...

they sound just awesome .... thank you for sharing ...
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KYHeirloomer



Joined: 21 Aug 2007
Posts: 552
Location: Central Kentucky

PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 10:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Plenty more where those came from, Snowy. I just didn't want to overwhelm Ginger all at once.

She's got a lot of great eats in store, once that pig is delivered.
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gingerpale



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1324

PostPosted: Fri Feb 12, 2010 3:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you, KYHeirloomer, I appreciate these 3 fresh pork ideas.
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