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Killer BBQ?
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2005 1:39 am    Post subject: Killer BBQ? Reply with quote

I got me some brisket and we're gonna have it over the weekend.

Anyone got a killer recipe for doing it on the barbeque? A recipe for a great dry rub?

Cummon! Make our weekend! Wink
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simona



Joined: 11 Mar 2005
Posts: 696
Location: israel

PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2005 1:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hello rainey, I really love your feet! Seems so cosy!
Now , as for your question: isn't brisket that part of the beef that you have to cook for about three hours before it's edible? If so, how can it be barbecued? Or did I mixed the cuts?
Anyhow, have a tasty weekend. ZI'll think of my blog-friends when dining and wining in Umbria and Milan next week.

No more war, ciao, ciao , ciao!
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MileHigh



Joined: 09 May 2005
Posts: 14
Location: Broomfield, CO USA

PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2005 2:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Rainey,
I'm no authority but I've only done brisket in the slow cooker with liquid smoke and then added the BBQ sauce at the very end. It is delicious but does take some long, moist cooking, I think. Good luck with it and let us know what you ended up doing.
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Sarape



Joined: 15 Dec 2004
Posts: 583
Location: Anniston Alabama USA

PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2005 2:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, who's feet are those anyway?
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melinda



Joined: 01 Oct 2004
Posts: 256
Location: Richmond, VA, usa

PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2005 5:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've done successful briskets by wrapping them in foil....topped first with any bottle of bbq sauce ..and cooked on a low temp for a long time....say 250 ...the number of hrs depents on size.....but then it's always tender
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2005 7:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, I always do the low temp/foil packet in the oven thing too. I like the texture better than the liquid method.

So who's got a great rub so I can get it flavorin'?

Them tosies is mine! It's the part I'm not embarrassed to share with the whole wide world. The rest of me is kinda rode hard and put away wet if you know what I mean... ::sigh::
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Judy



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 1196
Location: buried under a pile of books somewhere in Adelaide, South Australia

PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2005 11:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

not sure if this is what you're looking for Rainey, but if you're in a Moroccan sort of mood, why not try ras-el-hanout ...

Makes 2 tbsp
5 mins prep

1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/2 teaspoon allspice
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

1. mix all ingredients together.
2. store in a cool dry place.

Traditionally used for chicken or lamb, but if you like the spiciness of cumin and cinnamon, it might be worth a try.

Hope whatever you do tastes great! And let us know, won't you?
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2005 12:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm a big fan of cumin and the rest sounds quite exotic so I'm game. I'll go season the meat this afternoon and report back after we have it this weekend.

Speaking of Moroccan food, I've still got those lemons I preserved. I wonder where Erin is with that recipe for using them...
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Lady Amalthea



Joined: 18 Dec 2004
Posts: 136
Location: New York City

PostPosted: Tue May 24, 2005 11:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm of the club that always cooks brisket in a giant pot with lots of gravy and a TON of garlic (and sometimes "exotic" things like coffee grinds).

How do you do it in the oven? Does it still get a gravy?

I may have to try the Ras-El-Hanout next time I make lamb...
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Cornette



Joined: 18 Apr 2005
Posts: 39
Location: The Netherlands

PostPosted: Tue May 24, 2005 12:51 pm    Post subject: QQ Reply with quote

Do you know what I like on the BBQ?

Slice of french bread rubbed with garlicoil. When one site is roasted you turn it around and put a tiny piece of (goat)cheese on the roasted side and it melts while the other side is roasting.

Cornette
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Tue May 24, 2005 5:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cornette- My mouth is watering just reading your description!

Lady A- If I want gravy I do my brisket in a pot too. Maybe you could make gravy from the oven drippings. I've never tried.

And, Judy- The Ras-El-Hanout was lovely and exotic. I think it would be super on lamb.
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Judy



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 1196
Location: buried under a pile of books somewhere in Adelaide, South Australia

PostPosted: Tue May 24, 2005 11:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very glad you liked it, Rainey. You're right, it is fantastic on lamb. I used it to give some extra flavour to a lamb tagine I cooked for my family on Mother's Day a couple of weeks ago.

I just diced a leg of lamb, rubbed it with the ras-el-hanout and let it sit overnight, then cooked it in my beloved tagine for a couple of hours. It was very tasty and enjoyed by all.

I have been wondering if many cuisines have a similar sort of generic spice mix - the Moroccans have ras-el-hanout, the Indians have garam masala. But then I can't think of any more.
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DrBiggles



Joined: 01 Mar 2005
Posts: 14
Location: Richmond, California

PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2005 6:00 pm    Post subject: Re: Killer BBQ? Reply with quote

Hey All,

The beef brisket is one of the toughest cuts to do right on a grill or in a smoker. As everyone knows, it needs to be cooked at a low temperature to break down the collagen and NOT cooking the fat out of the meat. This requires that you are able to maintain your grill or smoker at about 225 degrees F for hours, usually more than 5. What this looks like are NO white plumes of smoke coming from your exhuast, only wafts of blue. This is easier to attain if you preburn your wood before adding it. Adding wood to an existing fire will cause it to smoulder a bit (white smoke), this creates creosote (bitter tasting) and will condense on your meat. If you get enough creosote it'll condense on the walls of your smoker and it'll have to be scrubbed clean and reseasoned.
My point here is, it's all about the fire. You could take that meat and just use salt & pepper, with the right fire the result will be outstanding.
There are plenty of dry/wet rub recipes out there, even more at www.bbqsearch.com (one of my favorite places). Rub that brisket, put in to a plastic bag at the bottom of your fridge and let sit for 2 to 3 days.
My suggestion is to make sure you can keep the fire low and even and indirect.
Oh, and never install refrigerator temperature meat on to a grill or smoker. You want the meat to rest out for 30 minutes or so, even to room temperature. Don't want to shock the poor dears, the result won't be as juicy or tender.

Biggles
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2005 6:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent suggestions! Fortunately, I have a gas grill with a smoker box so I have a lot of control over the heat.
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DrBiggles



Joined: 01 Mar 2005
Posts: 14
Location: Richmond, California

PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2005 6:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe for grilling, but all grills & smokers have hot spots. You'll probably be using only one burner and putting the meat on the other side?

You may want to consider wrapping a few bricks in foil and placing them between the fire and the meat, maybe above & below the rack. This way there's no direct path for the heat to burn the meat prematurely. Place your temperature probe at meat level (not in the meat), probably wire it to the grill. You are more concerned with oven temp. The meat can be checked later on with an instant read temperature probe. Or, if you have two wired or wireless probes, one for the grill and one for the meat.

Biggles
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