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Berry Tales -- start picking
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Debbie



Joined: 21 Feb 2005
Posts: 861
Location: Paris

PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2005 6:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

OK, clarification needed for the Australian.......

What are perogies please??? Embarassed

I am imagining a filled dumpling kind of thing, but have never heard the word perogie before so not sure if I am correct.

Does anyone have an easy recipe for making them and are they always sweet, or can you use savoury ingredients? What is the sour cream sauce that goes on top?

I love sour cream and don't know a dish that I couldn't eat it with... sweet savoury, or just spoonfuls of sour cream straight from the tub YUM! ...mind you I don't really like fresh cream ... hmmm strange.
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rebecca



Joined: 01 Dec 2004
Posts: 77
Location: near a pan of spanakopita

PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2005 6:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm glad someone else was having trouble--I couldn't visit the Berry Barn online either. Did you see this statistic from their website?

Quote:
"We harvest between 22,000 and 28,000 pounds of Saskatoons each year - all hand picked and graded by up to 80 pickers at the busiest times."


Shocked

I might have to take a summer vacation to Saskatchewan this year!
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2005 7:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's a link to some photos (and, I hope some recipes). http://www.personal.psu.edu/users/n/t/ntt107/frames/perogies.html

They are Eastern European dumplings. The one's I'm familiar with are potato. They are yummy and good candidates for that "comfort food" thing we had going for a long while. But I'll let someone who comes from that tradition fill you in. I've only had them prepared by others.
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2005 9:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

While I'm not Eastern European ethnically having lived in Saskatoon for much of my life I feel they are part of my heritage. Many many of the early farm settlers of Saskatchewan were from Ukraine and to a lesser extent Poland and Russia, areas sharing a common cuisine. (to give you some idea of the make up of Saskatchewan English is the most common "mother tongue" followed by Cree, then Ukrainian and French falling in a distant fourth) Perogies and cabbage rolls (holopschies??) and kielbasa and kashka are served at wedding receptions even at totally Anglo affairs. For years we, in Saskatoon, had a drive in restaurant (the Big O) that served only Ukrainian food made by a small army of kerchiefed Babas. They are indeed usually a savoury with potato and cottage cheese probably the two most common fillings but mashed potato with cheese is common as is sauerkraut, bacon and potato etc. One prepares a sheet of perogie dough, cut it in rounds, fill it with whatever and pinch the dough shut around them creating a nice plump half circle. They are then boiled until they float, then (ideally)fried in butter and served with fried onions and sour cream. Yes indeed, comfort food at it's finest.
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Sarape



Joined: 15 Dec 2004
Posts: 583
Location: Anniston Alabama USA

PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2005 10:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes David, I think that is the definitive post on perogies. I've always associated them with the Polish. Most common are indede potato and cheese filled boiled and then fried in butter. Just like hash browns.

My grandmother used to fry them with onions -- the potato filled. I've also had fig or dried-prune filled perogies.

They usually are bigger than raviolli. About 5 cm by 5 cm.
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Sarape



Joined: 15 Dec 2004
Posts: 583
Location: Anniston Alabama USA

PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2005 10:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I thought about making blackberry perogies last night and then decided it was too hot (95F outside yesterday afternoon) and so I made a quick batch of blackberry pancakes:

2 cups of blackberries, yellow corn meal, whole wheat flour, cinnamon, dry milk, salt, canned pumpkin --- mash it all up together after adding water to make a nice, purple batter.
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Dairy_Queen



Joined: 29 Jan 2005
Posts: 342
Location: Chicago and other places

PostPosted: Fri Jun 17, 2005 4:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's a little bit more on the history of perogies; pretty cool stuff.

What are the Origins of Perogy?
The perogy, pierogi, pyrohy, vereniki... is a food item of uncertain origins. Some say it was brought to Italy from the Orient as a pasta pocket food by the famous explorer Marco Polo. Its introduction to eastern Europe may have been through Poland over 500 years ago. At that time Queen Bonna of Italy married King Zygmut of Poland and the pierogi was introduced to Poland around that time. From Poland pierogi found their way to other Eastern European countries such as Ukraine and Russia. In Ukraine the word "vereniki" - the boiled ones - is used to refer to these delicious pasta products. In Russia, meat filled pasta pockets are referred to as "pilmeni". Whatever their origins, perogy are now enjoyed all over the world by people of all ethnicities. Go ahead, try some, you'll love them!
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Fri Jun 17, 2005 5:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As berries become more available and cheaper you might want to try this Summer Pudding from Ina Garten http://www.oprah.com/foodhome/food/recipes/food_20020916_puddingrum.jhtml


I made it last summer. I formed it in a bowl for a domed presentation. It was very attractive and easy to do well in advance. My family and guests were all over it!
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JustMe



Joined: 13 Apr 2005
Posts: 213
Location: Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2005 1:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

David wrote:
They are then boiled until they float, then (ideally)fried in butter and served with fried onions and sour cream. Yes indeed, comfort food at it's finest.
We also serve them with fried bacon. Very, very, VERY yummy...and best of all, not diet food by any stretch of the imagination.
There's a wonderful farmer's market about an hour's drive from here in the heart of Mennonite country (St. Jacob's) & they sell the most amazing perogies. I just finished supper but I'm drooling just thinking about it.
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Sarape



Joined: 15 Dec 2004
Posts: 583
Location: Anniston Alabama USA

PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2005 10:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just wondering if anyone else is actually picking berries or are you just dreaming of perogies?

I've noticed that adding 1 or 2 cups of blackberries to my pot of hot cereal does not make it sweet at all. There must not be much sugar in berries.

Also, blue fruits, like orange vegetables (yams), have the highest vitamin content. Another incentive to pick and eat.

Also, does anyone else pick wild dandelions and wild garlic?
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
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Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Tue Jun 21, 2005 2:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, I can only pick a couple of berries a day so, other than using them as a garni on something, I don't cook with 'em at all. I just eat 'em. And they're utterly sweet and fresh -- just like strawberries used to taste when I was a kid! YUM!

The BC blackberries I used to be able to pick myself were also very, very sweet. If you picked carefully. There were also not entirely ripe ones that had the darl black color and masqueraded as "ripe". Yet they could still be puckery tart.

There was a trick to IDing which ones were truly ripe but I've forgotten it. Might have had to do with "shininess". But, when in doubt, I don't pick something (be it lemon, tomato or berry) that doesn't want to fall into the palm of my hand at the first firm-ish touch near the petiole.

OTOH, there's the example of my plums. They would fall from the tree because they were completely ripe. I didn't "pick" them at all -- just picked them up from the ground under the tree. Even so, they needed a day or two to sit and develop their sugar and full, mature flavor.

Experiment as see what it takes to get the best flavor. Wink
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Debbie



Joined: 21 Feb 2005
Posts: 861
Location: Paris

PostPosted: Tue Jun 21, 2005 3:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you for the link. They did have the recipes as well. Will have to make me up a batch of these yummy treats. Sounds very easy to make and very much a "comfort food".

Have a nice day
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JustMe



Joined: 13 Apr 2005
Posts: 213
Location: Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2005 6:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote


My first Ontario strawberries of the season! Yum!
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2005 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

GORGEOUS!!!! I will get my first one's Saturday at the local farmers'market.
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Sarape



Joined: 15 Dec 2004
Posts: 583
Location: Anniston Alabama USA

PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2005 8:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes Rainey these blackberries aren't sweet unless you get them when they're loose on the stem.

The key is if your fingers are purple when you're done picking, you've picked sweet berries. I began picking before they were fully ripe.

I do like the tart or slightly sour flavour of these berreis before they get too ripe. I think they'd make a nice, old-fashion blackberry pie. Without added sugar, it would make a good main course.
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