Chocolate & Zucchini Forum Index >> Back to Chocolate & Zucchini <<

 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages 
 RSS feedLast posts feed   RegisterRegister   Log inLog in 

Farmers' Markets & Slow Food Movement
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Chocolate & Zucchini Forum Index -> Cooking & Eating
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Thu Jun 23, 2005 5:48 pm    Post subject: Farmers' Markets & Slow Food Movement Reply with quote

Pesto Man wrote:
let me encourage you all to patronize local farmer's mkts, not only will you be getting the best available ingrediants, you will be doing your bit to support local sustainable agriculture


I hijacked Pesto Man's post on a different topic to start this one because he raises a very, very important point. Altho it comes up here tangentially, we've never really addressed ourselves to our thoughts on the "Slow Food" movement and supporting local growers/artisans.

What's happening in your area?

I once read a story and I passed it along to the local Slow folks but I don't think they ever employed it. Still, I thought it was creative and could be very effective. What happened was (forgive me, I've forgotten all the specifics) an established restaurant somewhere that was committed to the Slow Food movement, had "trading cards" printed up of all the local growers and artisans they supported. With each meal they served, they provided as many cards as appropriate to that order to inform their patrons whose produce/cheeses/breads/wines/etc. they were enjoying.

The cards provided some kind of graphic, the contact info and some bio or other text that educated people about the process or challenges or whatever of providing excellent products and maintaining family and sustainable operations. Altho the chefs of this restaurant were offering their public a way to cut them out of the operation (well, let's get real: how many of us can do what they do day in and day out and/or provide that ambiance anyway?), they recognized that everything that recognizes and supports their suppliers supports that fragile network of authentic, high-quality industry (for lack of a better word) and ensures continuing standards and a human and humane future for all of us.

I thought that approach showed guts, confidence and creativity. I'm not a patron of high-end restaurants but I know I would have appreciated being able to go to a supplier and get an excellent, less known, harder to locate cheese to my table and know that it helped the restaurant know that that artisan' chances of continuing to be able to support his/her way of life were improved in the process.
_________________
God writes a lot of comedy... the trouble is, he's stuck with so many bad actors who don't know how to play funny. -- Garrison Keillor
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Pesto Man



Joined: 17 Jun 2005
Posts: 185
Location: New Orleans Louisiana

PostPosted: Sat Jun 25, 2005 11:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rainey, what a cool idea!!! Our Market (Crescent City Farmers Market)has an almost symbotic relationship with several local chefs whom can be seen at every market picking up ingredients, they also give demonstrations for the public creating a dish wih ingredients available at the market. (and then letting them sample it) We also have an annual fund-raiser where local chefs pair up with market vendors to create dishes for the patrons to pig out on!!!

Each market also provides a sort of "village square" where like-minded foodies professional and amature(sp) alike can discuss their "passions" swapping ideas, recipies etc.

In other words if youu are close to a local farmer's market, USE IT!!!, if not, try to get one!!!!

This suggestion and heart felt plea brought to you by your friendly neighborhood PESTO MAN
_________________
I would like a gin martini, straight up, olives on the side, as dry as my wit, as clean as my conscience.
and... as cold as my heart!!!!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2005 1:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

We have two smaller but charming and important farmers' markets in my area. ...at least within a 5-10 mile range. It was at one of them that I discovered sea asparagus and bluefoot mushrooms.

In Santa Monica (too far to be practical for me) they have a legendary one that attracts all the WestSiders and a tremendous number of celebrity chefs. When I've gone I've gotten things I've never seen anyplace else. And the best and most fun cooking class I've ever taken was with a chef (not so well known but accomplished and specialized in fundamentals like cheesemaking and olive curing) who took us trolling through the market. After a morning of shopping and sampling (one of the great pleasures of farmers' markets) we took our stuff back to the store for an improvised menu. What fun!

There's still so much to discover and farmers' markets is where the great stuff is!
_________________
God writes a lot of comedy... the trouble is, he's stuck with so many bad actors who don't know how to play funny. -- Garrison Keillor
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Shanti



Joined: 08 Jun 2005
Posts: 32
Location: Duluth, MN

PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2005 3:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rainy or Pesto Man (or anyone else!), would you be so kind as to elaborate on the term "Slow Food Movement"? It is something I've heard mentioned in passing, but I'm not familiar with the particulars behind it.

Duluth has two very small farmers markets - one on Weds afternoons at the college, and one on Saturday mornings downtown. They offer a variety of locally grown produce, free range chickens, cut flowers, and organic gouda cheese in a variety of flavors. I visit them occasionally, but for the most part I grow on my own what they offer ('cept for the chicken and cheese).

Now St. Paul, MN has a beautiful, wonderful, and huge farmers market that I believe restricts it's participants to Minnesota grown only. St. Paul has a very large Hmong population and the ethnicity shows in the variety of foods offered. Fabulous. Sadly though, I don't make it down much as it's a 150 mile one-way trip. Crying or Very sad
_________________
What if to reach the highest place you had to fall? Peter Mayer, singer/songwriter
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Pesto Man



Joined: 17 Jun 2005
Posts: 185
Location: New Orleans Louisiana

PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2005 4:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shanti, The Slow Food Movement was founded in Italy in the 80's as a protest against the coperate, homogenious, "Fast Food" culture that threatens to turn the entire world into a giant McDonalds. They instead celebrate , unique, traditional locally produced, foods and their producers. The movement has grown to all over the world, and their symbol is a rather charming little snail.(escargot)

this is, at least to me, ironic as as a grower, there is absolutely nothing charming about snails in the garden,( slimey little devils) but I digress!

More about the Slow food Movement can be fornd @ their website
http://www.slowfood.com/

Hope this helps
_________________
I would like a gin martini, straight up, olives on the side, as dry as my wit, as clean as my conscience.
and... as cold as my heart!!!!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
birgit



Joined: 31 Jan 2005
Posts: 247
Location: Germany

PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2005 4:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pesto Man, I've just logged in to provide the link to the slowfood page, but you've been much faster than me! Wink
anyway, concerning the snail topic, I might help with this link -- at least for about half of them: http://www.kuro5hin.org/story/2003/1/27/81550/5260
or this: http://www.theworldwidegourmet.com/fish/snail/101.htm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2005 7:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pesto Man wrote:
this is, at least to me, ironic as as a grower, there is absolutely nothing charming about snails in the garden,( slimey little devils) but I digress!


I hear ya! Shocked Altho I'll agree that they can be delicious, I have also had them devour complete, vigorous plants overnight leaving nothing but the larger veins of the leaves and an ichy trail!

Shanti- I'm glad to see Pesto Man provided you with the link. When I asked that question several years ago on another site, I got added to the local mailing list. I never got the info I was looking for but I got monthly invites to what sounded like fabulous, expensive meals that just weren't accessible to me. ...alas! Sad

But I'd add that another component of Slow Food is preserving the food that has excellence and authenticity and enables us, in our own homes, to have the quality dining experiences we're looking for. Things like preserving heirloom/heritage varieties of fruits, vegetables and other comestibles that commerce would make extinct. We owe it to the early pioneers of the movement that more and more of us have access to tomatoes that have flavor and not durable ship-ability as their hallmark.

Our local Slow chapter has adopted a turkey grower who is saving an old variety of turkey from extinction because the movement has put him in touch with a guaranteed market for his birds. These smaller-breasted turkeys have excellent flavor and are raised without hormonal enhancement and would have been forced out of the market, which is to say out of existence, without the commitment of Slow Food.

Other chapters spearhead the effort to save other unique products and family operations by bringing them to the attention of the Slow adherents
and providing them with the markets and appreciation they deserve. This particular effort has a name I'm rather fuzzy about. It has ARK in the title. The important thing is it's an important effort to ensure diversity in our food source and agricultural resources.

PS (I know I go on but I beg your indulgence) I've seen a very big payoff to the movement in my area. Eight years ago when I seriously began raising my own tomatoes because I couldn't stand another disappointing summer of ordinary pretty-but-tasteless tomatoes, I had to do a lot of research and I had to grow my own seedlings or drive about an hour away to get heirloom plants. Then, more variety of plants became available. BUT they were available once in the spring at two different events. I volunteered for one of them (even tho they were private for-profit enterprises) for years to try to ensure their success and continuance. If you missed these sales you were SOL. Now, these events are on everyone's calendars and highly successful. What's more, three different nurseries in my area regularly carry heirloom selections that get more and more extensive every year (this means affordable prices!) and people demand that this be so because the concept of authentic quality food is becoming the standard once again! So, I have really actually seen one small victory for PEOPLE as a result of this movement! Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy
_________________
God writes a lot of comedy... the trouble is, he's stuck with so many bad actors who don't know how to play funny. -- Garrison Keillor
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Pesto Man



Joined: 17 Jun 2005
Posts: 185
Location: New Orleans Louisiana

PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2005 8:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well said Rainey!!!!!

It is clear that you burn with a passion, not only for good eating, but for the underlying issues of sustainabllity and bio-diversity that are so closely related to not only our palates but our futures as well!!

I guess you could say I share the same fire Embarassed It wasn't very long ago
(within my memory at least) that most major cities were supplied with much of their fresh foods by local farmers, now with the rise of coporate agriculture, the average piece of produce travels over 1,500 miles before it gets to your table. (I don't know about you, but I'm not very fresh after a 1,500 mile trip Wink) And those who live on farms are outnumbered by those in prisons Exclamation

But thanks to those like you who care, groups like Slow Food,, and a growing local farmers market movement, we at least have alternatives!!

keep it up, and please support your local farmers(markets)

whoops I guess I got carried away!!!! sorry I guess I got carried away

end of sermon I'll try not to get so preachy now, timw for a drink Smile
_________________
I would like a gin martini, straight up, olives on the side, as dry as my wit, as clean as my conscience.
and... as cold as my heart!!!!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2005 9:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

PM (if I may...)- To further illustrate what you're saying:

I used to drive from Los Angeles to Vancouver with some regularity. This took me through the California Central Valley where about half the country's produce is raised. I (hobbiest tomato grower that I fancy myself) would pass trucks that were pulling what looked like massive bathtubs. They were easily 20 feet long and 5 feet deep and they'd be piled 6 feet high with tomatoes. Now, when my tomatoes are ripe, I can safely make a pyramid with 3 or 4 on the bottom and 1 on top of them. But there will be bruising if they sit that way long. That's the nature of a tomato.

I knew all the theory of raising durable, practical, commercial tomatoes that had to sacrifice flavor. But, to me, that meant fruit that could sit maybe 3-deep in a packing box that could be stacked. I had NO idea that before they got organized in that fashion for the wholesalers, the growers were looking for fruit that could hold up under 10 or 20 pounds of pressure! No wonder they were willing to give up flavor as a consideration!

I am just grateful to the pioneers of the heirloom/heritage movement and all the family growers who kept their prized strains going for generations so that, today, we can have tomatoes that taste like a tomato should and share that with our children.

That being said, I'm going certifiably LOCO waiting for my first tomatoes to get ripe! Shocked I keep thinking it CAN'T be much longer but I don't see one breaking yet. ...with the exception of the Stupices which are small but wonderful.

I'm betting with fields of basil you must grow a tomato plant or two. Wink Fresh tomatoes and fresh basil may be the finest thing on the planet! OK, a little artisinal cheese and some homemade bread doesn't hurt the combo either. THAT's a "Happy Meal" if you ask me! Wink
_________________
God writes a lot of comedy... the trouble is, he's stuck with so many bad actors who don't know how to play funny. -- Garrison Keillor
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Pesto Man



Joined: 17 Jun 2005
Posts: 185
Location: New Orleans Louisiana

PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2005 11:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rainey, I don't grow tomatoes, BUT I am close friends with several growers, and usually have my pick of several kinds......(last night we had a salad of 3 different varities including a lemon boy (yellow) some purple hued heirloom , and a more traditional red, with fresh basil (sweet, and purple) garlic, black olives, capers E.V.O.O. and some balsamic vinegar

I once read that tomatoes that are picked by machines deserve to be eaten by machines Surprised


all this available to those who support their local farmers (subtle hint)

I guess by now you realize that I don't type very well!!!!
_________________
I would like a gin martini, straight up, olives on the side, as dry as my wit, as clean as my conscience.
and... as cold as my heart!!!!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dairy_Queen



Joined: 29 Jan 2005
Posts: 342
Location: Chicago and other places

PostPosted: Mon Jun 27, 2005 1:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shanti wrote:
Rainy or Pesto Man (or anyone else!), would you be so kind as to elaborate on the term "Slow Food Movement"? It is something I've heard mentioned in passing, but I'm not familiar with the particulars behind it.

Duluth has two very small farmers markets - one on Weds afternoons at the college, and one on Saturday mornings downtown. They offer a variety of locally grown produce, free range chickens, cut flowers, and organic gouda cheese in a variety of flavors. I visit them occasionally, but for the most part I grow on my own what they offer ('cept for the chicken and cheese).

Now St. Paul, MN has a beautiful, wonderful, and huge farmers market that I believe restricts it's participants to Minnesota grown only. St. Paul has a very large Hmong population and the ethnicity shows in the variety of foods offered. Fabulous. Sadly though, I don't make it down much as it's a 150 mile one-way trip. Crying or Very sad


Yeah: DULUTH, MINNESOTA!!! I grew up on a farm near Duluth with all my relatives hailing from "Da Range".

In Chicago, we're amazingly blessed by Farmer's Markets. In the city proper, we have 35; if you include the suburbs, it's 78 Farmer's Markets! Shocked

The Chicago Sun Times had an interesting article on our Farmer's Markets, which I've copied below. Also, I've included a handy Seasonal Growing List that I keep in my Palm Pilot, which lets me know what's available so I can plan my shopping trips.

It's that time of year again. No matter where you live or work, you can bet that farmers from Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and Wisconsin are coming to a farmers market near you. In Chicago alone you can pick and choose from some 30 markets this year. Illinois boasts 170.

Throughout the country the number of markets is on the rise, as the taste buds of more and more Americans are awakened to the joys of locally grown, seasonal food. Indeed over the past decade, the number of markets nationwide nearly doubled, rising to 3,706 last year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Of course farmers markets are not new -- they're something of a retro trend. They probably first became popular in the United States back in the 1600s with the original colonies, according to Guillermo Payet, president of Santa Cruz, Calif.-based Local Harvest, an organization that maintains a national directory of small farms and farmers markets and other local food sources.

Starting in the 1920s farmers markets in the United States began dwindling as consumers opted instead for the convenience and efficiencies offered by the modern supermarket, Payet said. By the 1960s the open-air markets where farmers could sell their products directly to consumers were virtually extinct.


The trend began reversing in the 1970s as people began to seek out the quality and personal connection that locally grown food offered. The markets' ever-increasing popularity is encouraging to activists such as Payet who believe that personal relationships between farmers and the people who eat their vegetables and fruit will mean that more consumers take an interest not only in food's price but what it tastes like and how growing methods -- and consumption choices -- affect the land.

"We see farmers markets as an important component in the growing trend for bringing variety, quality, community and geography back into our food," Payet says.

With so many markets from which to choose, this may be the year to try something new. Whether you're a loyal customer at your neighborhood market or a complete novice to the pleasures of open-air food shopping, a little field trip away from your regular haunts to sample some of our region's markets may be in order.


Seasonal Produce Availability

MAY
Asparagus. Cabbage. Cherries. Greens. Leeks. Lettuce. Onions. Peas. Radishes. Rhubarb. Spinach. Sprouts. Squash.

JUNE
Apples. Asparagus. Beans. Berries. Cabbage. Carrots. Cherries. Eggplant. Garlic. Horseradish. Leeks. Lettuce. Melons. Nectarines. Okra.

JULY
Apples. Artichokes. Beans. Bell peppers. Berries. Cabbage. Carrots. Cherries. Corn (sweet). Eggplant. Garlic. Grapes. Horseradish. Leeks. Melons. Nectarines. Okra. Onions. Peaches. Pears. Peas. Plums. Potatoes. Radishes. Rhubarb. Squash. Tomatoes. Turnips.

AUGUST
Apples. Artichokes. Beans. Bell peppers. Berries. Carrots. Cauliflower. Corn (sweet). Cucumbers. Eggplant. Garlic. Grapes. Herbs. Horseradish. Leeks. Lettuce. Melons. Nectarines. Okra. Onions. Peaches. Pears. Peas. Plums. Potatoes. Pumpkins. Radishes. Rhubarb. Squash. Sweet potatoes. Tomatoes. Turnips.

SEPTEMBER
Apples. Bell peppers. Berries. Cabbage. Carrots. Cauliflower. Corn (sweet). Cucumbers. Eggplant. Garlic. Grapes. Greens. Herbs. Horseradish. Lettuce. Melons. Nectarines. Okra. Onions. Peaches. Pears. Peas. Plums. Potatoes. Pumpkins. Radishes. Rhubarb. Spinach. Squash. Sweet potatoes. Tomatoes. Turnips.

OCTOBER
Apples. Bell peppers. Cabbage. Cauliflower. Corn (sweet). Cucumbers. Eggplant. Garlic. Grapes. Greens. Herbs. Horseradish. Lettuce. Melons. Okra. Onions. Pears. Peas. Plums. Potatoes. Pumpkins. Radishes. Rhubarb. Spinach. Squash. Sweet potatoes. Tomatoes. Turnips.

NOVEMBER
Apples. Bell peppers. Cabbage. Garlic. Greens. Horseradish. Onions. Peas. Potatoes. Pumpkins. Sweet potatoes. Spinach. Squash.

_________________
Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read.
Groucho Marx
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Mon Jun 27, 2005 4:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pesto Man wrote:
Rainey, I don't grow tomatoes, BUT I am close friends with several growers, and usually have my pick of several kinds......(last night we had a salad of 3 different varities including a lemon boy (yellow) some purple hued heirloom , and a more traditional red, with fresh basil (sweet, and purple) garlic, black olives, capers E.V.O.O. and some balsamic vinegar


Yum! Those purple or "black" varieties are my personal favorites. I'm growing a new "black" variety this year -- Noire Charboneuse. Can't wait to get to try it. I've had wonderful luck with other French red/pink varieties and what the dimension of "black" could possibly add has me salivating as I type about it! Wink

I'm also fond of yellow varieties for a completely different reason. While the "blacks" have very dense, complex flavor, the yellows have a lighter almost citrusy flavor. I like that alternative. And it's so much fun to make a fresh tomato sauce that's yellow with the flavor of a red. Takes people completely by surprise and amuses the *^&^ out of me. Wink
_________________
God writes a lot of comedy... the trouble is, he's stuck with so many bad actors who don't know how to play funny. -- Garrison Keillor
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
birgit



Joined: 31 Jan 2005
Posts: 247
Location: Germany

PostPosted: Mon Jun 27, 2005 11:38 am    Post subject: Re: Farmers' Markets & Slow Food Movement Reply with quote

Rainey wrote:
What's happening in your area?


In the region I'm living there are fortunately several farmer's markets, some of them are open even every day (at least in spring, summer and fall) and I enjoy very much buying fruit, vegs and cheeses there.

Concerning slowfood, I've been to some of their events, which were speciality markets, e.g. for cheeses and such. You have to pay a little fee at the entrance and then you're allowed to try a lot of little slices and spoonfuls of this and that, and of course there's lots of information provided. And I generally arrive at home happily with a bag full of small containers (mustards, jellies, etc.) and a variation of little parcels with cheeses, hams, breads, etc., sometimes herb pots as well, for which I hope they'll survive on my windowsill. This year I bought a tomato plant called "tiger stripe" -- still curious about their look and taste, they're developing little blossoms at the moment ... Smile There are slowfood member meetings you can attend as well.

Several years ago I brought a bag of small plum shaped tomatoes from a market where they sell italian products. I keep a few of those tomatoes every year until very ripe to extract the seeds for new tomato plants, which always works out well. (... this is kind of traditional in our family, which dates back to my grandfather who, when I was a kid, one fall put the remains of his tomato plants onto the compost and ended up with 52 tomato plants in the following year Wink ...). And I mostly put whatever seeds I have into the next planting pot and normally forget about them until tiny leaves arrive and I start wondering which seeds they have been. The funniest plant I've got until now is a small tree with incredibly wild looking, big and fuzzy leaves, which, I've found out in the meanwhile, must be a vineyard peach Smile


Last edited by birgit on Mon Jun 27, 2005 3:38 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Shanti



Joined: 08 Jun 2005
Posts: 32
Location: Duluth, MN

PostPosted: Mon Jun 27, 2005 2:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you Rainy and Pesto Man for your explanations and links! Again, I have heard of this "Slow Food" movement but never really had a good explanation of what it was about.

My sister-in-law very kindly provided me with some tomato plants this year: 2 Brandywines (one red, one yellow), 2 Cosmonaut V, and 2 Roma's. She also prefers the heirloom but I don't know if any of these were from the heirloom varieties. I am very excited as my plants are beginning to bloom (I'm in zone 3/4) so I may actually get some vine ripened tomatoes this year!

My basil is coming up as well (I plant from seed). My first batch didn't germinate as we had a long cold spell during May, but this second batch is going great guns as the temps regularily hit 80* during the day.

Dairy-Queen: That's really cool! Where abouts was your childhood farm located? My Hubby and I live about 20 miles west of Duluth near Twig/Saginaw.
_________________
What if to reach the highest place you had to fall? Peter Mayer, singer/songwriter
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Mon Jun 27, 2005 4:27 pm    Post subject: Re: Farmers' Markets & Slow Food Movement Reply with quote

birgit wrote:
[Several years ago I brought a bag of small plum shaped tomatoes from a market where they sell italian products. I keep a few of those tomatoes every year until very ripe to extract the seeds for new tomato plants, which always works out well. (... this is kind of traditional in our family, which dates back to my grandfather who, when I was a kid, one fall put the remains of his tomato plants onto the compost and ended up with 52 tomato plants in the following year Wink ...). And I mostly put whatever seeds I have into the next planting pot and normally forget about them until tiny leaves arrive and I start wondering which seeds they have been. The funniest plant I've got until now is a small tree with incredibly wild looking, big and fuzzy leaves, which, I've found out in the meanwhile, must be a vineyard peach Smile


Birgit- Your markets sound like heaven! And you are describing, perfectly, why we still have heirloom/heritage varieties of veggies and other produce. They may go by other names in your part of the world but the concept is that these strains are "open pollinating" or "true" genetically so that they reproduce the same generation after generation. The traditional method of fermenting and saving seed for the next season kept these things going in family plots while commercial seed operations substituted their "improved" hybrid seeds in the general commercial agriculture and home garden cultivation, threatening to wipe out the traditional strains.

Many of the heirloom and heritage forms we have come with colorful stories of their history or bear the names of families who cultivated them for years, often carrying them from one country to another before they came to the attention of places like the Seed Savers Exchange and other pioneers of the heirloom/heritage movement.

So, here's a personal "thank you" from me and others to your grandfather and the others of your family who helped to ensure biodiversity when it wasn't in fashion!
_________________
God writes a lot of comedy... the trouble is, he's stuck with so many bad actors who don't know how to play funny. -- Garrison Keillor
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Chocolate & Zucchini Forum Index -> Cooking & Eating All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
Page 1 of 6

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group