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Paris
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simona



Joined: 11 Mar 2005
Posts: 696
Location: israel

PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2005 4:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry, I meant Dehillerin of course.
Simona
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Debbie



Joined: 21 Feb 2005
Posts: 861
Location: Paris

PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2005 6:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have to say that I disagree with the comment on the french being a bit dismissive about allergies (sorry cris). I have life threatening allergies and if I have had to mention the allergy, the staff have always been concerned that everything is ok for me to eat and I have had a very positive reaction.

If you act a bit like it is a dislike rather than an allergy, then you will probably be treated poorly over it, but if you take the time to explain properly you will have no problems. This has also been mentioned months ago in another topic.

As my allergies are life threatening I will say

"Je suis tres allergique a....." or "J'ai une allergie a la mort a......" If you tell them you are allergic to the death to an item of food they will make very sure it is not near your food. They do not want to be sued any more than restaurants or cafes in other countries do.

Being polite and explaining clearly I have safely eaten in all types of restaurants and cafes and stalls without a problem. I also never mention food dislikes in the same place that I have had to mention my allergy. That is when they get dismissive and treat you like a picky customer.

One thing I do really love about french restos/cafes etc, is that they are always willing to discuss ingredients and details about the dishes being served. If you express an interest you will have no problems, and in fact will have some fabulous food conversations!

That area you are staying in is near where I go to university. It is lovely, but a bit cold and windswept at present near the Luxembourg Gardens. There are heaps of little restos and cafes in the area and a really nice food and "other bits" market on wednesday and saturdays at Boulevarde Edgar Quinet. Pestoman will be home soon from his trip over here and can give you a critique for it. I am biaised as it si one of my favourites (if not my favourite!).
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Chicago Bear



Joined: 02 May 2005
Posts: 240
Location: Chicago

PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2005 7:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would recommend the Musee de Cluny for two reasons: the building is a beautiful, well-preserved little slice of what Paris looked like more than 200 years ago, and the 15th century Unicorn tapestries are fantastically displayed in a room that is a joy to be in. This could be experienced, if one chose, in 30 minutes, and I can guarantee you that you would not spend a better 30 minutes viewing art anywhere in the city.
I must disagree about the Pompidou, though. So the building is ugly? But what's inside is quite a lot of fun, if you like modern art. In the interests of full disclosure, though, I love EMP in Seattle. Calling the building ugly is actually a complement, but the payoff once you're inside makes you forget what those who live in Seattle have to look at. I was in federal court in Seattle three weeks ago, and the judge was proudly showing me the view from his chambers: "That's Puget Sound, that's the Space Needle, over there is Queen Anne's Hill, and that thing down there, well....."
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happenstance



Joined: 30 Sep 2005
Posts: 32
Location: Oakland, CA

PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2005 8:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi everyone,

These are such great suggestions and I happen to be in Paris right now, and even though I have been here many times before, you can never see and do it all, so some of these suggestions are wonderful.

My favorite thing to do here is walk and then stop in an interesting cafe or resto and then walk some more.

I too love Musee Malliol (I saw the erotic sketches of Klimt here last March) as well as the Musee Picasso and of course all the biggies. I also love catching free concerts in churches this time of year.

I am not even religious, but the music is so beautiful it is hard not enjoy it.

I am also digging the light installments all over Paris. They are so cool!

Ok, off to dinner now.

Ciao for now,
Maureen
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Sharing her home with Rimsky the cat, Cody the partner, and 9 happy hens.

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Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2005 11:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

simona, you are so poetic!

Debbie, Thanks for the help, it is a pretty serious allergy.

CB, The EMP has always reminded me of an everlasting gobstopper from "Willy Wonka", that is not to say it isn't amazing. The Travel Channel recently had a piece about the building, it's construction and exhibits. Despite living in the same city have only been there for drinks in the Liquid Lounge and to see friends spin. The building itself is a source of contraversy among Seattlites, afterall we have to have something to talk about when it's not raining. As for The Pompidu, I have never seen the whole building, but it seems many have strong opinions one way or another about it's appearance.
I have to ask, where did you stay in Seattle?
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Chicago Bear



Joined: 02 May 2005
Posts: 240
Location: Chicago

PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2005 12:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Erin, whilst in Seattle I stayed with my daughter and her husband. They live close enough to the arboretum that we can go walking there. The fun thing about EMP (aside from the vigorous opinions expressed by residents and visitors from as far away as Melbourne) is the audio gearup that you're fitted with upon entry. You decide what you want to hear, so your experience is completely individual. True confession: I'm hooked on this device. They now have it in the Louvre, where you can listen to commentary about 1,000 of their works of art, but only what you decide you want to hear. Even so, it can be a little controlling at times, just because all this information is available. As I was trying to leave the Louvre, I passed through the room with the Rembrandts. OK, ok, I said to my headphones, you can tell me about this before I go. So it's hard to actually get out.
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Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2005 1:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I love the arboretum, my family spent a lot of time there when I was growing up. They are fortunate to be living in such a spot.
I think I may have to check out the EMP the next time I'm in town, for more than it's cosmo's.
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SteveC



Joined: 16 Jul 2005
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2005 3:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Erin:

I have to disagree and highly recommend a trip to Dehillerin. I have purchased several copper pots and pans ther over the years and the prices are quite a bit less than in the States. Julia Child bought many good tools there over the years. Franck is my fave salesman.

I also recommend a trip to A. Simon, a store that has lovely stuff for the tabletop and lots of kitchen gadgets. I bought 3 of those ORCA silicon mitts there about a year before they ever appeared in the USA. I also bought a set of tableware there, 11 piece setting for 12 people. That was heavy!

As to museums, the Rodin and Picasso are quite nice and small.

Chocolate is also available at the Marquise de Sevigne in Place Madeline. About a block away on the Rue Vignon are two neat places. La Maison du Miel sells many, many different varieties of products -- all made with honey. Across the street is another place (can't remember the name) which sells truffle products.

Enjoy.
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simona



Joined: 11 Mar 2005
Posts: 696
Location: israel

PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2005 9:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you Erin, actually I'm not very poetic , I'm more of a cartesian (rational) type, therefore my associations are with Sartre, Camus and Simone the Beauvoir the existentialists, and not with Louis Aragon and/or Paul Eluard, (or very romantic 19th century Rimbaud) , the romantic poets of the 30-40' ( though I do like their sweet and sour poetry). But that's really Paris: you can be whatever you want, and always find the right cafe to drown your feelings!
And don't get me wrong, I love window shopping on the Faubourg St.Honore ( very much advised - it's an open museum of fashion), as well as La Grande Epicerie at le Bon Marchais or the Lafayette Gourmand. It's not contradictory at all: spiritual pleasure and sensual pleasure- that's, in my opinion, the essence of the french/parisian experience.

I'll let you know if I'll find anything new/interesting during my (possible, but not yet sure) trip to Paris in January.

It's the last 2005 post. Happy, very Happy 2006 !
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Debbie



Joined: 21 Feb 2005
Posts: 861
Location: Paris

PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2005 1:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Musee de Moyen Age (Hotel Cluny) is my favourite museum in Paris. I have been there so many times that the staff are starting to recognise me. It is just so fascinating and if you go early in the morning it is quite peaceful and you really get a feel for the era. Mind you I also take in my geo eyepeices and can spend half an hour looking at one peice of stone..... Embarassed My husband won't go there with me anymore as he is a modern guy and works in a totally modern industry, whereas my profession is old things so I can spend hours looking at one item. He gets bored and we have the "how long are we staying here?" discussion (whining Rolling Eyes )...

A. Simon is my personal favourite cookware shop... but I do not like the domestic store, I prefer the catering one next door to it. The staff are more helpful and you get professional quality cookware rather than domestic. The other A. Simon shop is very pretty though and does have some nice items for the home.

If you want anything and everything to do with chocolate making and cake decorating (also cake molds etc) then half a block back toward Dehillerin is a shop called Mora (13 rue Montmartre). The very back has a room dedicated totally to chocolate making accessories, and then the door to the right (as you walk in to the store) goes into a room which is crammed full of cake baking and decorating accessories.

I find Dehillerin too disorganised and expensive for my liking, but it is an interesting shop to have a wander through. Don't wear anything white though as the shop is filthy and I don't think it has been cleaned for centuries Laughing Just joking, but it is very dusty and if you touch anything you will get filthy.

Maureen, have to agree that the lighting for Christmas is really great. I think the fact that it goes dark so early makes it seem even more pretty. Each area has a different theme for their lights. I feel like a child walking through one of those "Santa's grotto's" sometimes. Think the cold air makes everything seem more clear and the lights appear to twinkle and glow so brightly. Love it!

Simona had a good idea about buying a guide. The one I buy every wednesday is Pariscope, but there is also L'Official de Spectacle. THey are about 30 or 40 centimes and list everything going on in Paris and edges. I underline the things I am interested in and then fold the page corners so I can find them again. My seat mate at university laughs as it is my first priority on a wednesday morning. I do it before I even get my books out! Laughing

I do like the Lafayette Maison section at Galleries Lafayette. Don't forget to take your passport to the information counter first and get your 10% discount card first!!! It is valid for any and all purchases at the store for a year. There is also a nice souvenir section up in the top of the other building (across the road) if you need Paris souvenirs. Printemps also does a 10% discount card which you apply for in the same way. Bargain shopping is my speciality Cool

Enjoy!
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clotilde
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Joined: 24 Sep 2004
Posts: 443
Location: Paris, France

PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2005 4:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Erin - For chocolate, check out Patrick Roger (http://www.patrickroger.com/), for pastries Pain de Sucre (14 rue de Rambuteau in the 3rd), and for spices Goumanyat (http://www.goumanyat.com/).

I second the Cluny and Jacquemart-André museum, and you might enjoy the quiet Musée de la Vie Romantique in the 9th. Perhaps a visit of the Opéra Garnier (http://visites.operadeparis.fr/?lng=en)?

I am a fan of Dehillerin myself, and if you're in the area don't miss G.Detou and Mora right next door.
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Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2005 7:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have seen pictures of Ina Garten posing in Dehillerin, and it seems just like the type of organized chaos I'm used to. You should see my office, though I do dust frequently.
You all are giving me so much useful information, I really appreciate it!

simona, so Paris brings out your inner poet, I wonder what it will bring out in me?
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Lilia Dignan



Joined: 23 Mar 2005
Posts: 159
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2005 9:14 pm    Post subject: Paris Reply with quote

Erin,
Clotilde beat me to it. I was going to add Patrick Roger to your list of chocolatier. I happened to pass it one midnight in May but the next day I will be at a wedding that lasted until 4:30 in the morning, a basket case the following day and flew home the next morning. I will be able to do him justice as I am spending my birthday in early February in Paris.

I remember Clotilde writing about L'Etoile d'Or, 30 rue Fontaine in the 9th. I also read other articles about the place in a couple of other reviews. Apparently, Scharfenberger likes the place as he trained in Lyons and it is the only place outside of Lyons that sells Bernachons (spelling) chocolates.

There is also Richart at 258 bd. Saint-Germain. Those cute artsy miniature chocolates are a delight to look at.

Simona - I might run into you in Paris. I leave SFO on January 26 and flying back on Monday, Feb. 6. My husband and I will be at the Westin Paris on 3 rue Castiglione.

There are some restaurants we want to try especially the new Yves Camdeborde's bistrot, Le Comptoir at 9, carrefour de l'Odeon and Mon Vieil Ami at 69, rue Saint-Louis-en-l'Ile. I will report my findings when I get back .
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kara



Joined: 10 Nov 2005
Posts: 5
Location: san francisco

PostPosted: Sat Dec 31, 2005 12:46 am    Post subject: Musee Marmottan - Monet Reply with quote

If you like Monet, the Musee Marmottan-Monet is a gem too. A collection of art given to Monet's son... mostly Monets but some others too

[/url]http://www.marmottan.com/fr/informations/#[url][/url]
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cake whore



Joined: 19 Dec 2005
Posts: 22

PostPosted: Sat Dec 31, 2005 6:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Erin,

I just came upon this article and thought it may be of interest to you.

http://www.concierge.com/destination/paris/itineraries

Alain Ducasse (the French chef) takes you on a two day tour of Old World Paris...tres romantique! (sigh)
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