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Comfort Foods
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anna



Joined: 30 Nov 2004
Posts: 45
Location: north carolina, usa

PostPosted: Mon Dec 13, 2004 3:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mmm. rebecca, how do you make you spanikotpita? do you put just spinich in it? I had some recently with leeks in it and it was amazing!

Also, how do ya'll make oatmeel with steel-cut oats? do you have to cook it overnight?
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Mon Dec 13, 2004 5:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rolled oats actually, this is the first I've heard of steel cut. Must look into it!
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Mon Dec 13, 2004 5:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

anna wrote:
mmm. rebecca, how do you make you spanikotpita? do you put just spinich in it? I had some recently with leeks in it and it was amazing!

Also, how do ya'll make oatmeel with steel-cut oats? do you have to cook it overnight?


You know, I was justs thinking (before I opened up this thread) that it had been a very interesting but fundamentally Anglo list. I was wondering where the comfort foods from other cultures were. Spanikopita is a great idea. I wonder, tho, for the people who used to have to make their own filo dough, how often one made spanikopita and if availability/accessibility were part of the "comfort food" formula...

Can you imagine having to actually *make* filo? Anyone ever done it?

Steel-cut oats are cooked just like rolled oats -- they just take longer. And have a completely different texture. They can be done overnight: bring them to a boil, shut off the heat, let them soften overnight and warm them in the morning. They can be done in a slow cooker overnight. You can do them in about 20 minutes in the morning (turn them on, take a shower, enjoy them over the morning paper). Or you can make a pot and warm a serving at a time each morning.

I make mine with bits of dried apple, raisins, nuts and cinnamon. I've also done them with pumkin pie spices. Even cold, it strikes me as very like a spoonful of rice pudding. Now there's comfort food!
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3-Martini-Lunch



Joined: 13 Dec 2004
Posts: 3
Location: Sonoran Desert, North America

PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2004 3:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="Rainey"]
anna wrote:
Steel-cut oats are cooked just like rolled oats -- they just take longer. And have a completely different texture.


Great comfort food! I cook mine in about half an hour, using an old heat-diffuser so i don't have to stir the pot all the time....steel-cut oats, I think, are oats that are pre-rolled!

Other great comfort food from Italy: cavalo e pane (cabbage and bread), sounds weird but it's got a head of savoy cabbage, a bunch of stale bread soaked in milk and then squeezed dry, olive oil, and 8 cloves of garlic, all sauted and cooked in a cast iron skillet til yummy and browned and slightly crusty.....smells heavenly, believe it or not.
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2004 7:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

3-Martini-Lunch wrote:
steel-cut oats, I think, are oats that are pre-rolled!


Well... not exactly "rolled". That's the process by which quick-cooking oats are feed through rollers to flatten them out for quick absorption of liquid. "Steel-cut" means that the whole groat or grain is sent through a cutter that makes a few median cuts that leave the bran intact and the endosperm still in that compact, natural shape -- only reduced to about 1-1.5mm in length. That's why, cooked, they retain that nutty flavor and chewy texture.

But I bet you really knew that. Wink Just wanted to be a little more precise so David got a clear idea. Wonderful to have you join the discussion, 3 Martini! Very Happy
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3-Martini-Lunch



Joined: 13 Dec 2004
Posts: 3
Location: Sonoran Desert, North America

PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2004 7:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="Rainey"]
3-Martini-Lunch wrote:
Just wanted to be a little more precise so David got a clear idea. Wonderful to have you join the discussion, 3 Martini! Very Happy


Fun to be here . . . and I *definitely* learned more about oatmeal Exclamation - the whole point of this, no? No wonder it's "groats" - never thought about that vis a vis the name, which brings to mind a favorite rather cruddy but amazing inn at the far northern tip of Scotland, called John O'Groats. Used to be nice but foreign ownership has relegated it to tawdriness.
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brighidsdaughter



Joined: 02 Oct 2004
Posts: 233
Location: Canton, TX USA

PostPosted: Wed Dec 15, 2004 4:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh gosh! I forgot all about steel-cut oats! I never cared much for oatmeal, didn't like the texture of rolled oats, and the way most Americans cook it so a fork can stand upright in it. My family always made them more "porridgey", with more liquid, but the texture still put me off. Then I was introduced to steel-cut oats on a trip to Canada, cooked all nice and porridgey, too. I now use rolled only as a cooking ingredient. If by chance you have leftover cooked steel-cut oats, include it in muffin batter along with some cinnamon and raisins -- very moist and yummy.
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Wed Dec 15, 2004 9:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can do them savory style too by substituting them for the rice in a risotto. This is what my dad used to call "stick to your ribs" cooking! Wink
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Sarape



Joined: 15 Dec 2004
Posts: 583
Location: Anniston Alabama USA

PostPosted: Wed Dec 15, 2004 9:58 pm    Post subject: Re: sugar coated comfort Reply with quote

melinda wrote:
to madame shawshank: i grew up eating bread, butter & sugar & also bread & mayonaise (which we pronounced "my" o naise) and wondered if we in the south were alone in our healthy habits...i must say our dentists were probably grateful!


Interesting. I also ate white bread, butter and sugar. Another one you don't mention is bread, mayonaise, and peanut butter --- Mmmm.

Now I'd say my favorite comfort food is the pancake filled with interesting fruits and grains and maybe crushed nuts of some kind. My pancakes get kind of ugly, but, of course, they taste divine.

Anyway, this is my first post on this forum. I'm living down in the heart of Dixie, now.
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anna



Joined: 30 Nov 2004
Posts: 45
Location: north carolina, usa

PostPosted: Wed Dec 15, 2004 10:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hey david, would you be willing to share your recipe for tapenade?
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Wed Dec 15, 2004 10:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd love to Anna! I adore the stuff and it is so easy to make in a food processor it hardly takes any time at all!

1 Litre of black/kalamata/nicoise olives in any combination, pitted (I just put them in clumps on the cutting board and slam them with the bottom of a quart sealer then pull the pits out)

6-8 anchovies in oil

juice of 1 lemon

1 tbsp (15 mls) capers, rinced (the original recipe calls for 3 tbsp but I found that just a tad overpowering)

6 cloves fresh garlic, chopped up a bit

1 tbsp herbes de provence

olive oil--enough to get the texture you desire (less than 1/2 cup works for me)

Toss the olives into the blender with the blade attachment and pulse until well broken. Add the garlic, anchovies and herb blend and pulse a few more times. Then add the lemon juice and pulse again. Finally turn the blender on and pour the olive oil in slowly until you get the texture you like.

Truly simple and basic and bursting with the Mediterranean

(I suppose at some point Clothilde would have tossed in some toasted pine nuts...... Laughing )
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mary g



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 20
Location: Cleveland, Ohio, USA

PostPosted: Fri Dec 17, 2004 5:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another vote for macaroni and cheese, which my mother taught me to make. She used a bechamel sauce, but called it a white sauce--I'd been making bechamel for years without knowing it.
Chocolate pudding, preferably homemade is another big comfort.
Back to very early in this thread--David mentioned swiss steak--my mother made something like this, too, which I loved, but don't have the recipe for.
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anna



Joined: 30 Nov 2004
Posts: 45
Location: north carolina, usa

PostPosted: Fri Dec 17, 2004 8:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

is bechamel just when you make a roux and then add milk?
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blm



Joined: 13 Dec 2004
Posts: 1
Location: Toronto, Canada

PostPosted: Sat Dec 18, 2004 4:20 am    Post subject: mac and cheese thoughts Reply with quote

David wrote:
... the Dickster likes it baked in an uncovered shallow tray with a minimum of cheese, no moisture added(well not much) and covered in parmesan, then baked to the point that the top breaks your teeth,


My comfort "mac and cheese" sounds similar but better Smile not tooth-breaking. I break up enough spaghetti for three (gotta have leftovers!) into about 3-inch pieces, and boil until perfect-for-eating. Then I add a fair amount (over a cup) of grated cheese (very old cheddar and parmesan), a can of flaked tuna, about 2 cups (total) of very finely chopped onion, celery, red and/or green pepper, chili pepper, and about a tablespoon each of garlic, hot sauce, ketchup and worcestershire sauce; everything mixed together well. Into a baking dish about 2 inches deep, top with about a quarter inch of fine salt&pepper bread crumbs, and shake it so some of the crumbs fall through into the mixture. Bake at 400F 20-30 minutes until bubbling inside. Cover with foil for the last half, to prevent the crumbs from burning. I know it sounds nasty and dry but it's not dry at all (neither is it wet ...). The strands of spaghetti with the hot melty cheese and bread crumbs clinging ... mmm.

David wrote:
...not to mention we have a "I cook, you clean" rule and cleaning up after that has baked itself rigid is no easy task. But it took me 20 years to tell him Very Happy


My husband and I started out that way. I cooked the first night, he cleaned. Then he cooked the next night and I cleaned ... and cleaned and cleaned. The third night we switched to "I cook and clean tonight, and tomorrow he cooks and cleans and I DO NOTHING". Works out great.
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Sat Dec 18, 2004 5:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What a tasty sounding treat blm! Tons of things going on in one dish!

Well the temp dipped to -20C a few times the last few days so true to form I've whipped up a batch of tapenade to warm my senses (and to take to a Christmas party tonight)
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