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Baking in Paris

 
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Parisienne Wannabe



Joined: 15 Mar 2005
Posts: 2
Location: Danville (by San Francisco)California

PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2006 12:45 pm    Post subject: Baking in Paris Reply with quote

Living in Paris has its quirks, of course! I need help with some baking questions, such as measuring and specific ingredients. I am tutoring a 10 year old girl in English, and she likes to cook, espcially "American Food", so thought Cookies would be fun. Started with a mix, from alsa, "Cookies Moelleux", wwhcih were fun and easy to make, not bad tasting either, although I think 10 year olds would eat any cookie and batter around. The side of the box gives a description of cookies, as being derived from a Dutch word, "koetje" brought to the US with immigrants, a typically American ttreat.
We'd like to move on to the big leagues, but need some recipes in metric...why is the US the only place to not use that system?
Anyway, have some recipes I have translated into metric, but am having trouble finding Baking Soda. I found levure chimique "Alsacienne" whose contents make it sound like baking soda, but is it exactly the same? Also found Levure Chimigue, which is also labeled Poudre a Lever, is this baking powder?
One last question, don't the French measure anything? Have been hard pressed to find cups or spoons marked with numbers, am off to the Rue Montmatre (which is by Les Halles, not in Montmatre) where I am told is a plethora of cooking and baking supply stores.
A bientot!
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villacollinette



Joined: 07 Dec 2005
Posts: 62
Location: Antibes, France

PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2006 3:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In French, baking soda is called bicarbonate alimentaire. In the grocery stores, it's usually not with the baking things, but rather with the salt and spices. The levure chimique is baking powder and comes in little paper packets. I don't know what the levure chimique Alsacienne is -- I haven't ever run across it.

And when baking in France, most things are weighed, not measured by cups, which makes everything much more accurate. You need scales, not special cups. And for teaspoons and tablespoons, they usually use actual teaspoons and tablespoons, unlike Americans who have special ones.

For recipes, your best bet is to either look on the internet for recipes written in French, or to search for recipes from the UK, which usually have both weight and volume measurements.

Hope this helps!
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fannie



Joined: 25 Mar 2005
Posts: 21
Location: Paris

PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2006 3:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I second everything villacollinette has to say but I will add that I have only found bicarbonate at Monoprix (next to the salt) and not other grocery stores.

I believe you can find measuring cups and spoons at Galeries Lafayette Maison and perhaps at Dehillerin (http://www.e-dehillerin.fr/) or the other kitchen equipment stores on the rue montmartre.

Fannie

ps: welcome to France from someone who went to elementary school in Danville.

http://tricoquine.blogs.com
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Debbie



Joined: 21 Feb 2005
Posts: 861
Location: Paris

PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2006 8:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tang Freres stocks large tubs of bicarb soda and also baking powder. Or try Casino stores. The one in the 16th on rue Saint Didier in Paris has an aisle with english and american foods.

Yes, things are measured here with scales more than cups etc. Do be careful when you buy measuring cups and spoons.... I bought a set and when I got home and looked at my recipe they were not the same equivelants (my recipe gave the weight/mls and the size - teaspoon etc). So I have a set of measuring cups and spoons which are absolutely useless to me.

A. Simon on rue Montmartre is my favourite place. THere is actually another thread which goes into a lot of detail about the various cookware stores in Paris. You might want to check it out before you go shopping. If you just want cake and baking accessories try Mora on rue Montmartre. It has everything for baking.
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If you cannot feel your arteries hardening, eat more cheese. If you can, drink more red wine. Diet is just "die" with a "t" on the end. Exercise is walking into the kitchen.
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carolg



Joined: 08 Nov 2005
Posts: 19
Location: NYC, USA

PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2006 6:45 pm    Post subject: THere is actually another thread which goes into a lot of de Reply with quote

Debbie, could you mention which one that is please? I can't seem to spot it in the list. Thanks
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frantom



Joined: 26 Jan 2006
Posts: 13
Location: Paris, France

PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2006 11:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

yeah, levure chemique is baking soda. the Alsacienne one is just a different combination but is not pure baking soda.

the indian grocer near la chapelle has bicarbonate de soude, too. the last place you should look, if you can't find it anywhere else, is the pharmacy, where it is sold for more money as an antacid.

Dehillerin won't have measuring spoons, but usually I use a little coffee spoon for a teaspoon and a soup spoon for a tablespoon.

good luck!
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chucha



Joined: 14 Jan 2006
Posts: 32
Location: Mexico D.F. / NYC / Bruxelles

PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2006 12:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

you can get measuring spoons/cups at ikea for about 1 euro. they have a 4 piece set with the following:
1/2 cup
1 tablespoon
1 teaspoon
1/4 teaspoon.
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Debbie



Joined: 21 Feb 2005
Posts: 861
Location: Paris

PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2006 12:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The ikea ones are useless... they are nowhere near the same amount as my English and Australian recipes. A friend who is Swedish also tried them and said the amounts where not accurate for her either. A standard cup in all my measurements is 250mls... the Ikea ones say they will do this, but do not. They also come in weird amounts. No 1 cup, half cup, third cup etc...

A waste of money in my opinion.

The thread was on cookware stores I think and should be in one of the forums. I will have a look later. It was not long ago.
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If you cannot feel your arteries hardening, eat more cheese. If you can, drink more red wine. Diet is just "die" with a "t" on the end. Exercise is walking into the kitchen.
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carolg



Joined: 08 Nov 2005
Posts: 19
Location: NYC, USA

PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2006 2:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Debbie. Maybe it was <I would like to purchase a wooden salad bowl in paris>...? Hmmmmm...maybe I should start one...
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Debbie



Joined: 21 Feb 2005
Posts: 861
Location: Paris

PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2006 3:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had a look through and cannot find the thread... very strange. Am wondering if it was deleted for some reason??? It went into quite a bit of detail on teh different cookware shops in Paris.

Basically it listed Dehillerin, A. Simon, Mora, and a few others which are on rue Montmartre. My preference is for A. Simon for general cookware (but the cooks shop next door, not the home kitchen shop which is a bit overpriced - like all of them) and Mora for baking.
_________________
If you cannot feel your arteries hardening, eat more cheese. If you can, drink more red wine. Diet is just "die" with a "t" on the end. Exercise is walking into the kitchen.
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carolg



Joined: 08 Nov 2005
Posts: 19
Location: NYC, USA

PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2006 8:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another source are restaurant supply stores-I found one by chance last trip in the 11e. EUROTRA 119, Bd. Richard Lenoir with another branch in the 13e EURO-CENTER 162, Ave de Choisy. Things are way cheaper here but you may have to buy a doz. of something in order to get one...lots of variety though...
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Melly



Joined: 24 Jan 2006
Posts: 72
Location: Limburg Province, The Netherlands

PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2006 4:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Clothilde has a section of the blog entitles "Conversions and Equivalents" that may be of help to you.

http://chocolateandzucchini.com/archives/2003/10/conversions_equivalents.php
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