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A holiday season we all can share!
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2004 5:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I got this recipe from the LA Times Food Section. Lots of ingredients but it's really just a simple bread dough. It's a wonderful, soft dough to work with and can be shaped many more ways than the recipe suggests. A simple, quick & attractive one is to form the filled dough into a rope and join the two ends. Then gently twist the rings together a couple times to form a loaf. Make sure the seam is on the bottom when putting it gently into the pan.

I've also done this for gifts breaking the dough down into smaller units and baking them in those lovely German parchment paper "pans". There are now also very attractive paper liner pans that fit into thin wooden cradles. Whole Foods and Sur La Table carry these. I also dust profusely with powdered sugar instead of the coarse sanding sugar.

For the marzipan filling I'll just break up bits of commercial marzipan and add it with or instead of the filling given.

I prepare the dough in my bread machine on the "dough" cycle. A machine that will do a 2 pound loaf will take 7 cups of flour for mixing (believe it or not!). But I remove the dough to one of those graduated food tubs with an airtight lid for proofing.

Sour Cream Babka

For the Dough
• 1 1/2 cups butter, softened
• 3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
• 3 1/2 cups bread flour
• 2 packets active dry yeast
• 1/2 cup granulated sugar
• 1 tsp. salt
• 1/2 cup warm water
• 1/2 cup milk
• 1 cup sour cream
• 2 eggs
• 1 egg yolk
• 2 tsp. lemon juice
• 1 tsp. vanilla
• 2 drops lemon oil
• 2 drops orange oil
• 1/4 tsp. almond extract

For the Filling
• 1/4 cup butter, softened
• 1 - 1 1/2 cups brown sugar
• 2 - 3 tsp. cinnamon
• 1 1/2 cups walnuts, coarsley chopped
• golden raisins (no amount given probably means I added this element and use a handful or so)

For the Wash & Topping
• 1 egg
• 1 egg yolk
• granulated sugar
• 2 tbs. water
• 2 tsp. coarse sugar

Dough: Rub butter into flours until crumbly using dough hook of electric mixer.

Combine yeast, sugar, salt, warm water, milk, sour cream, eggs, yolk, lemon juice, vanilla, citrus oils, and almond extract. Stir into flour mixture. Mix to form a soft dough, adding more flour if needed. Knead 5-6 minutes, then place in a greased bowl and cover. Refrigerate at least 4 hours or overnight.

Punch down dough. Divide into 2 portions. Roll each portion out onto a floured work surface into 14x10 inch rectangles.

Assembly: Sprinkle each rectangle equally with butter, brown sugar, cinnamon, chopped nuts, raisins. Roll long end up into a jelly roll.

Carefully place each into well-greased tube or angel food cake pan. Make slits in top of each cake, if desired.

Combine egg, yolk, a dash of granulated sugar and water. Brush dough with egg wash. Place cake pans in large plastic bags and seal. Let rise until doubled, about 45 minutes. Brush again with egg wash and sprinkle with coarse sugar.

Place cake pans on a large baking sheet (this protects bottom) and bake at 350 degrees until done, about 1 hour. Dust with powdered sugar before serving.

NOTE: For each of 20 servings (10 per babka):
481 calories
306 mg sodium
108 mg cholesterol
26 grams fat
55 grams carbohydreates
9 grams protein
0.65 gram fiber


Last edited by Rainey on Tue Dec 07, 2004 5:22 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2004 5:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Erin wrote:
My neighbors have just invited us over on Christmas day for a traditional Phillipino style dinner with a Guam twist. I am very excited Alfredo will be making short ribs, lumpia, a Phillipino style carpaccio (I don't remember the name) among many other delights. I am going to contribute a curried coconut soup which is one of my favorites.


I hope you'll tell us all about a Phillipino Christmas! Have a wonderful time! Very Happy
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2004 5:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gosh, Dick and I are sooooooooooo boring---but tradition insists we cook exactly the same Christmas dinner as did our grandmothers. These fine women were very very English and both emigrated to Canada shortly after the turn into the 20th Century. Now, sadly the English (and I only mean HISTORICALLY so no bashing me) have never been known for their imaginative cuisine and neither have our families! So it is turkey with gravy, mashed spuds, sweet potaoes baked bathed in maple syrup (okay a bit of a departure I suppose), brussel sprouts (steamed and fried with pancetta and garlic, a departure from the traditional "boiled to mush") and sage and onion dressing. I do miss my own mother's homemade carrot pudding!

Hmm, reading that all I can think of is ------------------- beige! Perhaps its time to shake things up Twisted Evil
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2004 5:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

David wrote:
Hmm, reading that all I can think of is ------------------- beige! Perhaps its time to shake things up Twisted Evil


David, it sounds homey and delicious. I hear ya about the color thing tho! Wink It's the simple problem of what's generally available in the Northern Hemishere this time of year. Shocked Waddaya gonna do?

We have a cold salad of broccoli and cauliflower tips lightly steamed (so as not to lose their color) and cherry tomato halves tossed with Italian dressing to brighten up the table. I'm also serving a roasted red pepper soup that has a nice bright, seasonal color. Just in case you'd like to try this Chuck Williams (Williams-Sonoma) recipe:

Roasted Pepper Soup

• 2 1/2 lbs. sweet peppers (I use red for Christmas; yellow is great for the summer)
• 3 tbs. olive oil
• 2 onions, chopped
• one 14 1/2-oz. can of chicken stock
• 2 cups water
• 1/4 cup dry vermouth
• 1 tsp. salt
• 1/8 tsp. cayenne
• 1 tbs. lemon juice
4-5 fresh basil leaves cut into chiffonade
heavy cream for drizzling
fresh basil leaves for garnish

Thoroughly scorch skins of peppers. Place in plastic bag to cool. Then peel charred skin away. Clean seeds and ribs from inside. Rinse and roughly chop pepper flesh. Set aside.

Warm oil in large kettle and sauté onions until translucent. Add chicken broth, water, vermouth, salt and cayenne. Partially cover and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 15-20 min. Add peppers and cook for an additional 10 min.

Drain vegetables, reserving liquid. Place vegetables in food processor or blender and throughly purée. Return both purée and broth to kettle. Add lemon juice. Warm and taste to adjust seasonings. Stir in shredded basil.

Serve with a small sprig of basil and cream drizzled on top.

My note: at this busy time of year who's going to send you to food jail for getting some nice roasted peppers in a jar and skipping the labor intensive roasting/peeling? Wink But, if you've got the time, freshly roasted and peeled will give you brighter color.

And I don't think tradition is boring at all! I think it's comforting and timeless. And tradition gives you the structure to experiment and expand your horizons for all the rest of the year.
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Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2004 9:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

David,
I agree with Rainey, you must add color to your table! The roasted pepper soup sounds wonderful. If it was me I would throw out the sweet potatoes entirely and make a roasted squash soup. I made one for Thanksgiving that got rave reviews. The idea came from a recipe off of the Sur La Table web-site and morphed to suit my taste. Then punt that Turkey out and roast duck or quail, ooooh quail in a savory chocolate sauce. My grandmother cooked bland food as well, it was the curse of a generation.
As far as dressing goes I just made one that was sepctacular! I got the idea out of Jamie Oliver's new cookbook, and then I changed it there was way too much pork for my taste.
Saute:
2 cups onion
2 cups celery
? pancetta sorry I eyeballed it.
Mix with:
Stale bread one loaf
1 1/2 cups apricots
currants ? some
sage
parsley
kosher salt
fresh pepper
I think that is it. Oh I almost forgot, a ton of butter and a bit of stock. I like my stuffing a little drier that most, but that can be altered.

I am thinking about making my first pudding this year. I have never had it and always thought of pudding as something Bill Cosby peddled on television. I am a bit nervous though, something with so much tradition behind it.
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swan



Joined: 23 Nov 2004
Posts: 450
Location: a Dutchie in HongKong

PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2004 11:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Erin,..kosher salt?!...
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anna



Joined: 30 Nov 2004
Posts: 45
Location: north carolina, usa

PostPosted: Wed Dec 08, 2004 2:06 am    Post subject: chanukah treats Reply with quote

I celebrate hanukah! tonight is the first night, and although i won't be there with my family (i go to UNC Chapel Hill in the neighboring town and am in the middle of writing a term paper) i know what my mama will be cooking. LATKES? have any of you ever had latkes? they are the best, crispiest potato fritters in the world. Grated potato and onion mixed with egg, salk and a little bit of matzoh meal, the pressed by hand in patties and fried in hot oil until the outside is crisp and lacy and the inside just a bit chewy! mmmmm. we also always serve them with sour cream and homemade cinnemon applesauce. my mama says that when i DO get to go home for hanukah on friday (my partner will is coming too, for his first hanukah) i get to choose the menu. i can't decide between cholent, which is a tradition fall stew made with beef short ribs, prunes, dried apricots, potatoes, yams, turnips and carrots baked for 12 hours, or my mom's amazing lab roast with olive tapenade. i think the roast meat would be a wonderfull compliment to the side dish i will request... MORE LATKES! (there's no way i'm willing to miss out altogether). tradition hanukah desserts include rugalach, a crescent-shaped cookie made with a very short, extremely finishy but VERY wonderful cream-cheese-based dough and filled with a wonderful mixture of nuts and chocolate, and sufganyot, the traditional israeli jelly donut made with a dough fermented all day before it's fried, so it has a wonderful, deeply yeasty almost sweet-and sour quality. yum!
anna
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Judy



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 1196
Location: buried under a pile of books somewhere in Adelaide, South Australia

PostPosted: Wed Dec 08, 2004 6:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Happy Hanukah, Anna and all forum members.

Anna, when you have finished your term paper and enjoyed celebrating with your family, could you please start a new topic and share some of your favourite recipes with us all? The dishes you describe sound delicious!
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Rainey



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 2498
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA

PostPosted: Wed Dec 08, 2004 5:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oops! Embarassed Judy reminds us that we're late in wishing Anna and others a very happy Channukah! Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Wed Dec 08, 2004 10:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Rainey and Erin, I agree entirely the table needs colour. So I'm going to try and talk the co-cook into the squash soup of Erins and the broccoli-cauliflower cold salad (this should also help in that two of the guests will be Dick's ex-wife and her cardiologist husband)

beige, beige go away!

happy Hannukah to all
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Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 2004 2:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

David, let me know if you would like the recipe! I am always happy to appily peer pressure.

Anna, thank you for sharing some of your Hanukah traditions with us. I hope that you are enjoying the celebration! Latkes are one of my favorites.

Swan, kosher salt is a coarse salt that is totally indispensible in the kitchen. It has a subtle flavor yet works magic to bring meats and veggies to their fullest potential. If you don't have any run out and buy some today!
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 2004 5:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes Erin, please, I'd love the recipe for roasted squash soup. (I'd chuck the sweet potatoes too if I could get away with it but his nibs is particularly attached to them)
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Erin



Joined: 18 Oct 2004
Posts: 1654
Location: Within view of Elliot Bay, The Olympics and every ship in the Sound

PostPosted: Sat Dec 11, 2004 12:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am not a picky eater, but sweet potatoes have to be fries or crisps in order for me to find them appealing.
Bear with me on this recipe, I tend to eyeball everything.

2 butternut squash, roasted with olive oil and kosher salt
a good sized chunk of pancetta maybe two cups? chopped
1 medium onion diced
saute pancetta and onion till brown then add roasted squash. add 5 cups chicken stock and blend till smooth. Return to stock pot add juice of one orange, (mandrin would be nice), 1 Tbs demi glace poulet, pepper, fresh nutmeg and salt all to taste. The origional recipe called for 1/2cup cream but I didn't think it necessary it was rich enough with the pancetta and added demi glace. One thing that is a must is the honey walnut butter.

For that whip up 4 or 5 Tbs butter with 2 Tbs butter and 2 Tbs minced walnuts. Then spread out 2 more Tbs walnuts on a sheet of plastic wrap and place butter on top and roll up to form. Refridgerate for at least an hour. Slice and serve as a garnish in soup.

I got serious raves on this, I hope you like it. I eyeball everything so adjust as you see fit!
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"It's watery....and yet there's a smack of ham."

"It's hot ham water."
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David



Joined: 30 Sep 2004
Posts: 1855
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Sat Dec 11, 2004 6:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Erin This sounds wonderful, and not too difficult either!
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brighidsdaughter



Joined: 02 Oct 2004
Posts: 233
Location: Canton, TX USA

PostPosted: Sat Dec 11, 2004 11:10 pm    Post subject: tamale fillings Reply with quote

Apologies for being so tardy in replying to this. Embarassed Here are ones I've actually done:
Picadillo of cooked, shredded pork or beef with tomato, onion, garlic, raisins, cinnamon & chili powder

Cooked, shredded chicken with mole sauce

Queso fresco, jack, and parmesan-style hard cheese with sauteed onion & garlic & zucchini, roasted red pepper and poblano pepper strips

Sweet tamales of queso fresco, candied citron, raisins, cinnamon & brown sugar, with a masa made with butter, lightly flavored chicken broth, and tinted pink with grenadine syrup.

I'm lucky that I can buy bags of dry "masa para tamales", which is more coarsely ground than tortilla masa. I've never mastered the art of tying them shut with cornhusk strips, so I use different colors of cotton string to denote the different fillings.
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